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Although it's only the beginning of a very long course, filled with over 40 of Hitchcock's films, just as notable should be the films that are not being shown over the course of the next month. Whether for lack of time, lack of rights, lack of materials, or lack of interest, there are 13 films directed by Alfred Hitchcock that will not be shown. (This is assuming that the list of films that TCM provided is comprehensive.) They are as follows:

  1. The Pleasure Garden (1925)
  2. The Mountain Eagle (1927) [this film is lost, which explains its absence]
  3. Easy Virtue (1928)
  4. Champagne (1928)
  5. Juno and the Paycock (1930)
  6. Elstree Calling (1930)
  7. Mary (1931)
  8. Waltzes from Vienna (1934)
  9. Secret Agent (1936)
  10. Sabotage (1936)
  11. Young and Innocent (1937)
  12. Under Capricorn (1949)
  13. To Catch a Thief (1955)

Personally, I'm most sorry about Under Capricorn, especially after learning that New Yorker critic Richard Brody holds it in such high esteem (and, of course, Ingrid Bergman). And, most baffling is the exclusion of To Catch a Thief. I've also included a link to a particularly good print on YouTube of Young and Innocent and a link to dailymotion for Under Capricorn. Thankfully, a number of these films are available through the openculture link that the course provides.

 

What do the rest of you think? Any thoughts on any of these films? Any especially worth seeking out for non-completionist reasons?

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I've seen Easy Virtue and was rather underwhelmed. 

 

Juno and the Paycock is based on a quite good play to which it is mostly faithful, features players who were part of the original stage cast and/or went on to work with Hitch later, so it's got some interest, but is rather indifferently filmed.

 

I haven't seen Elstree Calling, but it sounds like a fascinating mish-mash, part musical review, part "sci-fi" about television. Probably interesting at least, if not good.

 

Haven't seen Mary either. It's the German language version of Murder, supposed to be inferior.

 

(While we're talking about alternate versions, another film apparently not being broadcast is the original silent version of Blackmail. The film was shot first as a silent and then remade as a sound film. Supposedly, there is no shared footage between the two versions. Many in the know say that the silent is actually the better version.)

 

While not ranking up there with his very best, I think that Secret Agent, Sabotage, and Young and Innocent are all great viewing and well worth one's time. They used to be considered public domain, so should be easily found online.

 

I think To Catch a Thief is not one of his best, but it's still good fun and worth a look if one hasn't seen it yet. It used to show on AMC a lot, so perhaps it's not part of the TCM library?

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One that I'm definitely going to be checking out is The Pleasure Garden (1925), as it was Hitchcock's solo directorial debut and has already been mentioned in the course. Thankfully a lot of the silent films are available on Openculture, and I hope that their quality will be better than what I would find elsewhere online. Interestingly enough, White Shadows (1924) is one that I wanted to see after poking around Hitchcock's IMDB and seeing how deeply involved he was with the film (he's credited as a writer, set decorator, production designer, editor, art director, and assistant director), but the film was considered lost until 2011 when the first three reels were discovered in a garden shed in New Zealand. The New Zealand Film Archive is apparently still working on its restoration, so it's not available to view.

 

In general, I really wish that there would be a list of recommended films to watch posted each week along with the new lessons. Of course I plan to follow along on TCM, but Hitch's silent films aren't playing until July 5 while the course will already be looking into the 1930s by that time, and I want to watch his work on my own as I'm learning about each era of his career. I think they did that with the Slapstick course, but here I'm not sure where to begin with Hitch.

 

I'm sorry about Under Capricorn (1949) too, as I've been wanting to watch more of Ingrid Bergman's films and I've heard good things about it. The fact that they aren't playing To Catch A Thief (1955) baffles me, but I own it on DVD and I'm not a huge fan of it anyway in comparison to Hitch's other two films with Grace Kelly, so I'm not all that bothered.

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I've seen Easy Virtue and was rather underwhelmed. 

 

Juno and the Paycock is based on a quite good play to which it is mostly faithful, features players who were part of the original stage cast and/or went on to work with Hitch later, so it's got some interest, but is rather indifferently filmed.

 

I haven't seen Elstree Calling, but it sounds like a fascinating mish-mash, part musical review, part "sci-fi" about television. Probably interesting at least, if not good.

 

Haven't seen Mary either. It's the German language version of Murder, supposed to be inferior.

 

(While we're talking about alternate versions, another film apparently not being broadcast is the original silent version of Blackmail. The film was shot first as a silent and then remade as a sound film. Supposedly, there is no shared footage between the two versions. Many in the know say that the silent is actually the better version.)

 

While not ranking up there with his very best, I think that Secret Agent, Sabotage, and Young and Innocent are all great viewing and well worth one's time. They used to be considered public domain, so should be easily found online.

 

I think To Catch a Thief is not one of his best, but it's still good fun and worth a look if one hasn't seen it yet. It used to show on AMC a lot, so perhaps it's not part of the TCM library?

 

Easy Virtue is probably my favorite of his early silent films, with Champagne and The Farmer's Wife being the weakest.

 

Up until June, the 30's were a black hole to me as far as Hitchcock's filmography, so I made an effort to watch as many of his films of this decade as I could (thankfully, a lot of them were on Amazon Prime!). Really enjoyed most of them like Secret Agent, Young and Innocent, and Sabotage. Plus, it was interesting to see some of Hitchcock's common motifs like guilt/innocence, spies, wrongly accused people, and whatnot present.

 

Also, I wasn't that crazy with The 39 Steps *runs away*

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Of course I plan to follow along on TCM, but Hitch's silent films aren't playing until July 5 while the course will already be looking into the 1930s by that time, and I want to watch his work on my own as I'm learning about each era of his career. I think they did that with the Slapstick course, but here I'm not sure where to begin with Hitch.

That is what stumps me most about the timing. Why start the course on the 26th of June and not the following week to put it closer to the airdate? Unlike the later films, they have to figure that most of their audience probably doesn't have access (except on YouTube) to most of Hitch's silent features.

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That is what stumps me most about the timing. Why start the course on the 26th of June and not the following week to put it closer to the airdate? Unlike the later films, they have to figure that most of their audience probably doesn't have access (except on YouTube) to most of Hitch's silent features.

They have to structure it this way unforunately, as they did with the slapstick course, because they have to fit a seven-week course into a month of programming (as themes on TCM usually only last one month). I just wish that the course was more aware of this and gave suggestions as to which films would be relevant to the lessons and a good idea to view each week.

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They have to structure it this way unforunately, as they did with the slapstick course, because they have to fit a seven-week course into a month of programming (as themes on TCM usually only last one month). I just wish that the course was more aware of this and gave suggestions as to which films would be relevant to the lessons and a good idea to view each week.

 

You are correct, it has to do with fitting a longer course around a 4 week festival. I thought I was doing a better job this year with that, but please provide any suggestions you might have - it is hard to prioritize viewing any films this week as the TCM festival doesn't start till next week.

 

This year, the opening week is dedicated to the silent film period of Hitchcock's career, so the key film this week is The Lodger, followed by The Ring and Downhill. Next week, the British Sound Era, I will focus on 4 films: Blackmail, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes. If I only showed two out of those four films in an actual film class, I would like have chosen Blackmail and The 39 Steps, because they are the most representative of the period and Hitchcock's experimentation. Hope this helps. 

 

Best, Rich (Instructor, 50 Years of Hitchcock)

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You are correct, it has to do with fitting a longer course around a 4 week festival. I thought I was doing a better job this year with that, but please provide any suggestions you might have - it is hard to prioritize viewing any films this week as the TCM festival doesn't start till next week.

 

This year, the opening week is dedicated to the silent film period of Hitchcock's career, so the key film this week is The Lodger, followed by The Ring and Downhill. Next week, the British Sound Era, I will focus on 4 films: Blackmail, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes. If I only showed two out of those four films in an actual film class, I would like have chosen Blackmail and The 39 Steps, because they are the most representative of the period and Hitchcock's experimentation. Hope this helps. 

 

Best, Rich (Instructor, 50 Years of Hitchcock)

 

I certainly don't mean any disrespect by pointing out what's not involved, as I think that it's a great and well-structured course regardless. Just shining a light on those not being shined.

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I certainly don't mean any disrespect by pointing out what's not involved, as I think that it's a great and well-structured course regardless. Just shining a light on those not being shined.

 

I didn't take it as disrespect, and I hope I didn't sound defensive.

 

I am always on the lookout for better ways to teach in this massive format with thousands of students. 

 

I have set a goal to better set up a more limited number of essential films.

 

One key to that will be starting in next week's lectures with Wes Gehring where we focus on only 4 films to illustrate the specific time period (such as British Sound Film).

 

As I mentioned in the previous post, this thread has me thinking it might be good to really highlight say two films for those who can't watch much more than that. 

 

Keep up the suggestions! 

 

Best, Rich

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You are correct, it has to do with fitting a longer course around a 4 week festival. I thought I was doing a better job this year with that, but please provide any suggestions you might have - it is hard to prioritize viewing any films this week as the TCM festival doesn't start till next week.

 

This year, the opening week is dedicated to the silent film period of Hitchcock's career, so the key film this week is The Lodger, followed by The Ring and Downhill. Next week, the British Sound Era, I will focus on 4 films: Blackmail, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes. If I only showed two out of those four films in an actual film class, I would like have chosen Blackmail and The 39 Steps, because they are the most representative of the period and Hitchcock's experimentation. Hope this helps. 

 

Best, Rich (Instructor, 50 Years of Hitchcock)

Yes, this helps very much! I'm fairly familiar with Hitchcock's films from the forties and fifties onward, so the silents and thirties films were the ones I was having trouble with. I'll definitely be watching those silents this week and the sound films next week! Thank you so much!

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ya i was a bit stunned that To Catch A Thief was left out of the mix, a gem of a film and I think considered one of Hitch's masterworks smack dab in the middle of his 50's run starting with Rear Window. 

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If memory serves correctly, Hitchcock remade several of his British movies once he was in Hollywood, two that I remember are "To Catch a Thief" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much." I believe Hitch wanted to remake them because he felt he didn't do the material justice the first time due to budget constraints, short shooting schedule, and his then-limited experience as a filmmaker.

While I'm commenting, I'd like to add that there are some fine short-subject videos on Vimeo dealing with Hitchcock and his cinematic themes. Here are two of the best:

1. The Eyes of Hitchcock

 


2. The Voyeurism of Hitchcock

 

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What a challenge - thanks for starting the course this week, developing the course to include the TCM programming, and utilizing a nice variety of teaching & learning tools. I like the Hitch or Hike game component. Can't wait for more reading assignments. #lessonplanning

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If memory serves correctly, Hitchcock remade several of his British movies once he was in Hollywood, two that I remember are "To Catch a Thief" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much." I believe Hitch wanted to remake them because he felt he didn't do the material justice the first time due to budget constraints, short shooting schedule, and his then-limited experience as a filmmaker.

 

The only British film that Hitch remade in Hollywood was The Man Who Knew Too Much.

 

I've seen The Eyes of Hitchcock before. Interesting, but I think having the footage loop back and forth was a major mistake. It becomes not so much about the eyes as the bobbly-heads of Hitchcock.

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  1. The Pleasure Garden (1925)
  2. The Mountain Eagle (1927) [this film is lost, which explains its absence]
  3. Easy Virtue (1928)
  4. Champagne (1928)
  5. Juno and the Paycock (1930)
  6. Elstree Calling (1930)
  7. Mary (1931)
  8. Waltzes from Vienna (1934)
  9. Secret Agent (1936)
  10. Sabotage (1936)
  11. (1937)
  12. Under Capricorn (1949)
  13. To Catch a Thief (1955)

Of this list that was posted early in the thread of the films that we are not covering in the course I have only seen the two American Films listed, Under Capricorn and To Catch a Thief.

 

IMO To Catch a Thief is mostly fluff. One of the fluffiest of Hitchcock's films. Better movies along the same lines are

 

39 Steps

Notorious (a personal favorite)

and Saboteur

 

Under Capricorn is a very different film for Hitchcock and one that I don't remember well having only watched it once. I don't remember enjoying it that much.

 

I think both of these American Films probably are not listed cause their ownership is different than most of Hitchcock's films.

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I am most upset that they are not showing Sabotage (1936), which is probably my favorite of his 1930s films overall. Watched it a lot when I first got it on VHS in the 1980s.

Sabotage is worth studying for many reasons - the extended suspense sequence with Stevie and the package, the knife murder done with (film) cuts to various body parts and utensils, integration of the Disney film, the anti-fascist theme and representation, the "melting" of Piccadilly Circus, etc.

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I don't mind To Catch a Thief not being on the list for the Hitch spotlight.  It's a well-known film and it is shown often.

 

We seem to be missing two excellent British films from the 1930s: Sabotage and Young and Innocent.  I highly recommend both.

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I didn't take it as disrespect, and I hope I didn't sound defensive.

 

I am always on the lookout for better ways to teach in this massive format with thousands of students. 

 

I have set a goal to better set up a more limited number of essential films.

 

One key to that will be starting in next week's lectures with Wes Gehring where we focus on only 4 films to illustrate the specific time period (such as British Sound Film).

 

As I mentioned in the previous post, this thread has me thinking it might be good to really highlight say two films for those who can't watch much more than that. 

 

Keep up the suggestions! 

 

Best, Rich

It seems to me that a slight delay between the material we're studying and discussing this week, and the airing of the films on TCM next week, works quite well. We have time to process the information and opinions, and then we can choose for ourselves which films we want to see. When we actually watch this or that particular film, the experience is like a midterm or final exam--"Oh, NOW I see what people were saying earlier about montage [or expressionism, or pace, or camera angle, or the Russian influence, . . .]" For me, at least, this delayed "review" in the form of an entire movie is more likely to stick than a more immediate viewing would. Ideally, I'd watch it BOTH early and late, but there are so many fascinating films to watch, and there's never enough time.

 

I'm certainly not trying to discourage the professor from giving us some "higher priority" titles each week, of course.

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Although it's only the beginning of a very long course, filled with over 40 of Hitchcock's films, just as notable should be the films that are not being shown over the course of the next month. Whether for lack of time, lack of rights, lack of materials, or lack of interest, there are 13 films directed by Alfred Hitchcock that will not be shown. (This is assuming that the list of films that TCM provided is comprehensive.) They are as follows:

  1. The Pleasure Garden (1925)
  2. The Mountain Eagle (1927) [this film is lost, which explains its absence]
  3. Easy Virtue (1928)
  4. Champagne (1928)
  5. Juno and the Paycock (1930)
  6. Elstree Calling (1930)
  7. Mary (1931)
  8. Waltzes from Vienna (1934)
  9. Secret Agent (1936)
  10. Sabotage (1936)
  11. (1937)
  12. Under Capricorn (1949)
  13. To Catch a Thief (1955)

Personally, I'm most sorry about Under Capricorn, especially after learning that New Yorker critic Richard Brody holds it in such high esteem (and, of course, Ingrid Bergman). And, most baffling is the exclusion of To Catch a Thief. I've also included a link to a particularly good print on YouTube of Young and Innocent and a link to dailymotion for Under Capricorn. Thankfully, a number of these films are available through the openculture link that the course provides.

 

What do the rest of you think? Any thoughts on any of these films? Any especially worth seeking out for non-completionist reasons?

 

One small correction: #4 should be The Lodger (1927), not Champagne (1928). In other words, The Lodger is not on the TCM schedule, whereas Champagne is. The rest of the non-scheduled Hitchcock films listed here are correct.

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One small correction: #4 should be The Lodger (1927), not Champagne (1928). In other words, The Lodger is not on the TCM schedule, whereas Champagne is. The rest of the non-scheduled Hitchcock films listed here are correct.

Actually, The Lodger is supposed to be an eleventh hour substitution for Champagne in the schedule.  Thank goodness!  However, as of 5:55 pm (MST) on 28 June, the "Full Schedule"  accessed from the TCM website does still list Champagne as airing after The Farmer's Wife and before The Manxman.

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One small correction: #4 should be The Lodger (1927), not Champagne (1928). In other words, The Lodger is not on the TCM schedule, whereas Champagne is. The rest of the non-scheduled Hitchcock films listed here are correct.

Hmmm... You've uncovered a bit of a discrepancy. The schedule for that day lists Champagne:

 

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/index.html?tz=est&sdate=2017-07-05

 

But this schedule lists The Lodger:

 

http://hitchcock50.tcm.com/assets/imgs/TCM-128_MOOC_Hitchcock_Schedule_r1.pdf

 

The listing on the TCMdb also claims that Lodger will show on the 5th:

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/449308/Lodger-The/

 

A Mystery!

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