Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Hmmm... You've uncovered a bit of a discrepancy. The schedule for that day lists Champagne:

 

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/index.html?tz=est&sdate=2017-07-05

 

But this schedule lists The Lodger:

 

http://hitchcock50.tcm.com/assets/imgs/TCM-128_MOOC_Hitchcock_Schedule_r1.pdf

 

The listing on the TCMdb also claims that Lodger will show on the 5th:

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/449308/Lodger-The/

 

A Mystery!

Hey, Chuck.  I'm guessing that Dr. Edwards convinced TCM to substitute The Lodger for Champagne and that TCM simply hasn't updated that Full Schedule page yet.  I'm 99% sure that The Lodger will air.  Of course The Lodger can be seen online in a number of places (including YouTube), but, because it is such an important early film, it SHOULD be aired on TCM.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if you have taken the noir course or the slap stick course but i will say this, I was able to take both classes WITHOUT being a TCM subscriber because I own many old movies and the internet has many available for free online.

 

That being said, the movies Richard Edwards selected to go with the course were chosen with purpose and care. You won't be disappointed .  The ones he picked needed to be chosen to go along with the lecture. With the noir course, I sometimes said, why didn't he pick this one or that one too, but I has the course went along it fit.

I wasn't disappointed with the first two and I'm sure you won't with this one!

 

Take care,

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, I wasn't that crazy with The 39 Steps *runs away*

 

I just rewatched The 39 Steps the other night.  It may not seem so spectacular at first, but it grows on you.  It's sort of the prototypical wrong-man/man-on-the-run film for Hitchcock, and it's got a great screwball comedy-esque dynamic between the romantic leads.  It sets the stage for later films like Saboteur and North By Northwest, and Madeleine Carroll establishes the "Hitchcock blonde" type.  It's a suspense thriller that's also a playfully sexual romantic comedy.  All that kind of stuff.

 

I'm a big fan of 1930s films in general, and I enjoy Hitchcock's 1930s work as well.  I've got The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes, and The Man Who Knew Too Much on DVD (and Young and Innocent, too, although I haven't seen that one in quite a while), but I'd really like to see Secret Agent and Sabotage again.  Too bad they didn't make the cut on TCM.  As a DVD/Blu-ray guy, I wish some top-shelf distributor (Criterion?) would release legit versions of these films so I could add them to my collection.

 

What do the rest of you think? Any thoughts on any of these films? Any especially worth seeking out for non-completionist reasons?

 

Young and Innocent features a very famous crane shot that is referenced a lot in Hitchcock interviews and retrospectives.  Sabotage features an equally famous sequence with a boy delivering a package that he doesn't know is a bomb.  Of the three mid-'30s films (Secret Agent, Sabotage, and Young and Innocent), I'd say Sabotage is the most essential, although Young and Innocent is sort of an overlooked gem and Secret Agent has an intriguing cast for classic movie buffs (Robert Young, John Gielgud, Peter Lorre, and The 39 Steps' Madeleine Carroll).

 

As for Under Capricorn, I have seen it (possibly on TCM several years ago), and didn't particularly care for it, as I remember.  (Although there were some cool camera moves and stuff.)  But I was hoping TCM would air it as part of this festival so I could see it again and maybe reassess my opinion of it.

 

I'm also surprised such a well-known film as To Catch A Thief didn't make the final cut, but Cary Grant and Grace Kelly are well-represented elsewhere in the lineup.  Overall, it's a solid festival, and I look forward to rewatching films like Topaz and Torn Curtain and Stage Fright and Jamaica Inn and The Trouble with Harry, which I haven't seen as much.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Question:  At this last TCM Film Festival I had the oppourtunity to see REAR WINDOW at the Egyptian theater and it was like I'd never seen the film before.  It was truly a magnificent experience.  My question is:  wasn't that shown in the nitrite print version?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I, too was disappointed that Sabotage was not included in the schedule.  THat's a film that could really bring on some great conversation.  Hitchcock's own observances about the film and his own percieved mistakes with it are interesting.  John Loder is a fairly uninspiring leading man, but Sylvia Sidney turns in a great performance.I think that it ranks among her best performances.

 

And for fans of To Catch a Thief who live in St. Louis, the St. Louis Art Museum will be showing it on Friday, July 28 as part of the Art Hill Film Series.  Films are shown outdoors on Art Hill and there are food trucks and entertainment beforehand.  The museum is also open later.

http://slam.org/filmseries/INDEX.php

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Young And Innocent is definitely worth a watch - especially for the lovely Nova Pilbeam.

Also a favorite. It is part of my DVD library. I wish, though, there was a recording of No One Can Like the Drummer Man. I really love that tune.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I rewatched Easy Virtue, which I remembered as my favorite of Hitchcock's early silent films. Certainly the film lacks most of the technical aspects of other films that we've discussed like The Lodger or The Ring, but I still think it's a pretty good film. There are a few cool trick shots in the opening (Hithcock does again his blurry POV shot as the judge looks through his monocle), but other than that it is pretty straightforward. What grabs me is how tragic Larita's story is, and how unfair her treatment is. It puts in perspective the role and position of women back in the day.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first watched the 39 steps- i said yawn fest. But i found myself wanting to watch it again. It has interesting quirky stuff in it- like the man with missing finger, the jealous farmer, the music hall scene.

To me it's like Sabatoge. odd things are in it, like the blind man, the circus troupe, the feisty midget, the sly murder threat- the guy pointing to a book that says murder- those to films have lesser known stars, move slow but they are genius

 

 

Quote:

I just rewatched The 39 Steps the other night.  It may not seem so spectacular at first, but it grows on you.  It's sort of the prototypical wrong-man/man-on-the-run film for Hitchcock, and it's got a great screwball comedy-esque dynamic between the romantic leads.  It sets the stage for later films like Saboteurand North By Northwest, and Madeleine Carroll establishes the "Hitchcock blonde" type.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Chuck.  I'm guessing that Dr. Edwards convinced TCM to substitute The Lodger for Champagne and that TCM simply hasn't updated that Full Schedule page yet.  I'm 99% sure that The Lodger will air.  Of course The Lodger can be seen online in a number of places (including YouTube), but, because it is such an important early film, it SHOULD be aired on TCM.

If you search Youtube for "Silent Hitchcock Films Bill Rafferty" you will find NINE films (YIPPEE) that I believe include Champagne. Thank you Bill, will send him a note! (William Lafferty, Phd., former film prof at Wright State University, Fairborn, OH and former instructor of mine). 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Easy Virtue is probably my favorite of his early silent films, with Champagne and The Farmer's Wife being the weakest.

 

Last week I saw Easy Virtue and Champagne for the first time (the online versions), and rewatched The Farmer's Wife on TCM.  I like them all.  The Farmer's Wife is pretty solid as a silent comedy with a bit of its own style.  Champagne is a straight-up, high society comedy, which was interesting to see from Hitchcock.  Very light.  The kind of madcap heiress comedy that would pop up out of Hollywood throughout the 1920s-1930s.

 

Easy Virtue, on the other hand, is a drama, and I really dug that one, too.  I especially love the beginning courtroom sequence, which shows Hitchcock's visual creativity on display as he keeps lively what could easily have been a boring expositionary slogfest.  He dances between the courtroom and testimonial flashbacks and brings the heated trial to life without bothering with the details of what it is the lawyer or the witness is saying.  Hitch shows the back-and-forth and we get the general idea.  No need for extra intertitles recounting the whole thing.  We're not reading a book, after all.  And the telephone operator scene later on is pure genius.  No words needed there, either.

 

I really wish I had access to the latest restorations of the "Hitchcock Nine", so I could see the most complete versions of films like The Pleasure Garden.  But I also wish a more complete version of Easy Virtue would turn up somewhere, as I understand the only version known to exist is edited down and from a 16mm copy.  So even the new restoration is lacking maybe twenty minutes of film (or whatever).  And I think I read that the only known copies of Champagne originated from back-up reels containing alternate footage (the second-best takes).  Not sure how much of a difference it would be, but it would be nice to see the film as it was originally shown.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...