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1.  As far as similarities between the opening of The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger, I think the most obvious one is the sure-handed camera work.  The way the sequences are filmed and edited show forethought and precision.  The films are very different in tone, however, and I think The Lodger does a great job of pulling the viewer into the story from practically the first frame.

 

2.  The Hitchcock style is evident in the very first image, of a screaming woman.  A close-up image of a woman in turmoil will appear in many Hitchcock films.   Also in the way a variety of elements combine to provide the narrative.  There will be a few other Hitchcock films which feature flashing neon (e.g. the original The Man Who Knew Too Much).  Also in the editing.  Every shot is an essential part of the whole scene, nothing is superfluous or out of place.  

 

3.  The image of the screaming woman is part of the title sequence, with the music a possible imitation of her screams; her murder is almost a prelude to the film.  It reminds me of a few things, first of all the wonderful Saul Bass sequence which opens Vertigo, and features a close-up on a woman's eye, which slowly pulls back to reveal the face.  Hitchcock would use a woman's scream, overlaid with the sound of a train's cry, as a method of cutting in The 39 Steps.   Other Hitchcock movies that feature female screams used as part of a greater aural palette include Psycho, The Birds, and Frenzy.

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Unlike THE PLEASURE GARDEN (1925), THE LODGER'S opening jumps straight into horror. The pace and tone of the two opens is drastically different. One needn't presume that the former film would become a horror, whereas there is no doubt the type of film the latter is to be.

 

The use of music supports this effect, and the quick cuts to various faces, and to the press, give a sense of anxiety and urgency that was absent in the previous film's opening. The use of colour and shading sets the scene and gives the impression of night/outdoors/indoors, etc. without resorting to clumsy sets. Therefore the focus stays on the people and the action, not the background.

 

In a way, I think the scream is even more terrifying in a silent film, like when you have a bad dream and are trying to scream but no sound comes out. The use of music conveys the sense of what we are seeing as well.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


Both share a moody nighttime setting, both play on perceived threats that go nowhere (In Pleasure Garden, the gentlemen courting the chorus girl, and in The Lodger, the "murder's" reflection in the food stand) to give a ghoulish uneasy feeling to the proceedings. Unlike Garden, Lodger doesn't have any focused leading characters. The witness, who presumably will show up later, has the only notable speaking role, but even she's drowning in a sea of faces. Garden instead has a more American introduction set up (" I'm John Doe, how are you ~ played by Bob Smith). The Lodger also has a much more frenzied feel to it, compared to Garden's unsettling creeps.


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


Starting off with a screaming victim certainly seems unusual and I'll peg as being part of the "Hitchcock style" without being familiar enough with it. Interestingly the woman seems to have gold fillings on her teeth, a realistic touch that wouldn't normally fly for a young vicitim. We certainly have the voyeuristic tone to the whole opening: the camera sitting in the crowd, in the backseat of the news van, and most anxiety-producing, the waiting for the telegraph to finish typing what we've already read and move to the next line.


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


It's a tight frame, and (at least in this print) is the first thing we see. Her distress and the short shakes of her head leave us with a confused and claustrophobic image, imparting perhaps a strangling? I certainly think the uncomfortable sudden image, as well as the unglamorous treatment of the victim, lend the shot an urgent quality that makes up for the lack of a soundtrack. I'm curious however if a good organist would also contribute a melody or screech to match? The shot brings vague memories back of Psycho, but the murder victim in Strangers on a Train also had a claustrophobic shooting arrangement. 


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The Lodger has a very true Hitchcock feel. Of course the scream at the beginning is very "psycho" shower scene. The music is so intense. No problem that it is a silent film. The shots are eerie and creepy, the music like I said is intense and creates such a feeling of dread. The Hitchcock style is certainly visually stunning. Amazing photography. He's really beginning to find his voice in this silent film.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

The Lodger is more intense opening keeping the audience searching for the clues straight away n getting glued as the scenes move on a rapid pace whereas the other one focuses more on characterization with wry humor

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

He as usual focusing on the location support the story n not a mere set/background. Eg the signs/ placards/ signboards etv

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

Human expressions speak a thousand words!! And sure Hitchcock knew how to milk it as that's why may be he adjusted to movies with sounds seamlessly as he may not have been overtly worried of the change and focus only on expression. Psycho and Vertigo too had captured such screams effortlessly

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


My immediate reaction is the difference in pace of the first few seconds between the two films. In The Pleasure Garden, we open to girls racing down a staircase. However, in The Lodger, it opens on a woman laying down and screaming. However, in The Lodger, there is an immediate shift to the high-paced feelings associated with a crime, particularly a violent one as this appears to be. 


The music also serves different purposes between the two films. In The Pleasure Garden, the music gave off "good vibes": life was whirling on by but everyone's doing what they can to make as a good a go as they could. However, in The Lodger, the music ramps up the feeling of panic associated with a crime.


Overall, I just felt a different tone associated with each film. The Pleasure Garden reminded me more a Gold Diggers of 1933-type film, while I associated The Lodger more with Hitchcock's later works.


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


While I'm not 100% sure it's an element of the "Hitchcock style," I thought the music was reminiscent of what I've come to associate with Hitchcock films. The face-paced music further reinforces the panic shown on screen and creates an immediate feeling of unease that I assume remains throughout the film. There was also the handing/finding (I forget) of a note around the scene of the murder. Some little Easter egg like that, which creates an intrigue in-and-of itself is another technique that I associate with Hitchcock. I think what stood out to me as an excess of emotion was the constant barrage of news talking about the murder. It refused to let the audience forget it for a second, and it fed into the panic of the characters involved. 


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


There are two things that I believe make the shot work, even without sound. The first is the use of extradiegetic sound. While there is no audible scream, the audience is lead to believe that something is wrong from the tenor of the music being played. The other aspect that makes the shot work is the off-kilter filming of the woman screaming. By that, I mean that Hitchcock does not shoot he straight-on; she is shown at an angle. This departure from normal shooting indicates a normal departure from the normal-ness of everyday life (in other words, something wrong is happening). The scream that comes immediately to mind is the iconic Psycho scream.


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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


Similarities: Opening scene immediately draws you in.


Differences: Pleasure Garden opening does not hint of the macabre, while The Lodger jumps right in.


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


The film immediately puts you in a state of disruption. You feel anxious and interested in what is happening on the screen. The images that stand out to me are the ones of the witness, her emotions are over the top but help tell the story, especially since it is a silent film. The sound/music also is essential in setting the mood.


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


The opening image is close up and the movement of her mouth makes you believe that you can actually hear her scream, especially with the synchronization with the sound/music. Psycho!


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pleasant garden opening is clear and lighted though the lodger is shadowy but gets the viewer directly involved of what is going on and not only an observer.  But still in both films the camera is observing the observers. 
 
The music in the lodger is getting up and down to assure the feeling of suspense
both of the films share the director interest in the cuts and facial impressions but in the Lodger there is faster cuts and wider locations and  faster motion. the picture in the Lodger is blue, Misty, hazy focused and unfocused with impressive wide angel shots to reveal the inner feelings of characters as a typical impressionist. 
 
in the Lodger there is less use of title cards and in many scenes the written words are  impeded in the context  such as newspaper titles or neon titles as a part of the visual context of the scene and not an outsider item.  
 
 
 
For the scream the director  used music with beats and it reminds me with the killing scene in Psycho. 
 

 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? The scream in the opening of Lodger indeed casts the viewer into an immediate anticipation of terror contrasted to the more whimsical feel of Pleasure Garden.  Hitchcock does not use as many techniques to focus the viewer on certain details of the scene in Lodger, as in fading out the sides of the staircase sequence and focus only on the purse in Pleasure Garden.  A theme of blonde or 'fair-haired' women as objects of desire -- and victims of murder -- emerges.  Hitchcock's use of dialogue cards is minimal, deftly using the shots of the news feeds and outdoor crawls to advance the story.

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? I love the almost anthropomorphic look of the van with the two round windows and heads bobbing within, whimsical yet somewhat menacing -- a similar visual device used in the police chase in To Catch a Thief.  Shades of Frenzy as well, with shots of the crowd massing for a better view.

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? A face with mouth and eyes wide almost universally conveys a scream (Edvard Munch!), and Hitchcock heightens the effect by capturing the face from a low angel and having the actress look up.  Also consider the context and juxtaposition of the shots immediately prior and following. A similar face in a different context could almost be laughter.  Screams abound in Hitchcock (Psycho of course), but the silent scream of Jessica Tandy in The Birds readily comes to mind here.

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1) the main difference I noticed was the mood. The Pleasure Garden starts very light-hearted and comedic while The Lodger drops you right into the crime and the terrorized victim.

2) Images that stand out for Hitchcock technique are the sheer horror on not only the victims face but the observers/bystanders as well. The lady that found the body was so distraught she could barely tell her story. Very Hitchcock, reminds me of The Birds (restaurant scene) as well as others.

3) Hitchcock often does the open mouth scream. Of course Psycho comes to mind as well as Frenzy (the only Hitchcock movie I do not like and never want to see again). I disagree you cannot hear the scream in this silent movie though, he captured her terror in that close up so well I don't think anyone could help but hear that scream.

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1. The mood and execution are the two main differences I saw between this picture and The Pleasure Garden. As some have pointed out already, The Pleasure Garden is more laid back, as it starts with just a normal everyday scenario inside a dance hall before the shock and terror. The Lodger, on the other hand, just goes right into the action without any explanation, and with that, it serves as a great start to any murder mystery story.
 
2. The screaming woman, for starters, and the addition of quick camera transitions, the large amount of supposed witnesses and passer-bys, not to mention that one guy that tries to make light of the situation.
 
3. Even without sound, we can see the terror in the woman's facial expressions as she screams for help. I don't think any other shot other than a close-up of the woman screaming can better illustrate the emotion of straight-up fear. We immediately get the idea that something happened or is about to happen, and as such, we the audience sit back and be the witness to something much bigger. The one scene that comes to mind that's similar to that in Hitchcock's later work is during the infamous shower scene in Psycho (1960).

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1) the biggest difference between the two openings is the mood.  The Pleasure Garden was very fun and light hearted from the scenery to the characters.  The music was very bouncy and fun which helped with the mood since it is a silent film.  The Lodger opening was very dark and there were few characters at first.  The music in this opening short matched the sequence being almost scary to a point.  

 

2) The Hitchcock juxtaposition is evident here.  The way he is showing the difference moods of the characters and jumping between them to tell the mood and to help move the story along.  The woman witness in the crowd jumping to the gentleman in the coat and then to the gentleman in the phone booth spreading the story.  These are all ways of moving the story along at a certain pace.  And of course showing the teletype machine telling the story to the audience with no need for dialogue screens to come up.  This helps Hitchcock to tell his story without taking away from the "action" on the screen.  

 

3) When the woman's face is shown at the beginning that is the only thing you can see besides fog on the screen.  This means you have to focus in on what is happening to her face and expressions.  Even though it is silent the music is lending itself to a "scream" type sound with all the string instruments playing in a high range.  This type of shot comes back around in Hitchcock's movie Psycho in the shower scene.  The women's face is on the screen and is really the only thing you can see when he shows it.      

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1. The Pleasure Garden's opening was happy with upbeat music.  The Lodger's opening is frantic and suspenseful.  

 

2.  I believe that some of Hitchcock styles shown are tilted camera angles (notably the opening scene with the woman screaming).  Locations set in the film also are key to the plot, which is something done often in his films.

 

3.  As noted in the first answer, I believe the tilted angle of the woman's face helps with the scream.  Also, the soundtrack to the film plays an important part as well.  Be it an organ or shrieking strings as done years later during another scream scene in Psycho.

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​The opening scenes of The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger​ from first glance, feel like different films. The tone is much different. From the opening shots (dance hall vs. woman screaming), to the subject matter (night of frivolity vs. serial murder). However, there is a constant theme in each, an audience. In the dance hall, we have a panning close-up shot of the front row of male audience members. In the streets of London, we have an evolving audience from eye-witnesses, reporters, newspaper press operators, and finally patrons of the press. There is a constant of voyeurism.

 

The one element of Hitchcock style" that struck me was the director's use of color. Scenes portrayed as outside were tinted blue. Scenes inside were tinted yellow. This element made the audience member perceive the scenes differently. The blue scenes were mostly active, with much movement and action that move the narrative forward (the witness retelling her story at the coffee cart, the truck delivering papers, the public reading a lighted ticker tape). While the yellow scenes were mostly passive, with people listening, writing, typing, and the active elements being performed by machinery (teletype and printing press). Another element that I appreciated was exposition through printed word, through the printing of the teletype and rolling text of the ticker tape.

 

The opening shot of this film is a woman screaming. While we can not hear her screams, we feel them through the movement of her mouth, the off kilter angle of her face, and her gaze off camera. The flashing of the words, "To-Night Golden Curls" is also very off putting, adding to the unease of the moment.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

These two films are yin and yang.  They are, it seemed to me, oddly connected by hot smoky nights of cigar smoke inside The Pleasure Garden and the foggy chill outside. One is the fulfilled sanguinary act while the other the unfulfilled prurient dreams. The frenzy of the news and news paper’s delivery system vs. the stationary involvement of the audience are the differences in the climate in these opening scenes.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

The ingredients Hitchcock loves to use begins with the first shot - the ultra closeup of the screaming woman (blonde, naturally).

The montage of the action around the murder scene, which follows the action as the murder story progresses. These quick cuts bring tension to the opening of the film, and provides a distraction from the actual murderer.

 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

 

 

Once again using this close shot of the scream, made me focus on her mouth and in retrospect I would swear I actually heard the scream. Of course Hitchcock’s notorious screams occur in a shower and in an attic.  My favorite scream, however, is the almost scream in The 39 Steps which occurs with a cut to a railroad train. Brilliant.

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Sorry a tad bit late to the Party! But here goes.

 

1: The difference between Pleasure Garden and The Lodger:

 

Obviously, Pleasure Garden had a sense of fun, lightness. But as the scene progresses it started with a promise of hope and as the newly arrived girl had gotten an entrance into the theatre world. In contrast The Lodger had a darker tones then Garden. It had added an element of deeper focus shadows which elevates the eventual tale.

 

2. The Beginning of Hitchcock's Style:

 

The beginning of Hitchcock's signature is already defined by the opening of the Lodger. The extreme close-up of the "blonde" woman screaming is the start for  the voyeur in us the cinema goers to pay attention. Hitchcock's insightful into human nature is quite defined here. We humans are by nature a  nosy bunch. Much like his later film "Rear Window" he fully developed the idea of the voyeurism. His fixation on death is very much a British sense of the macabre. It is very much a national identity in Britain. Yet, we see his obsession with blondes which we shall see in future films.

 

3: Any Limitation?

 

No. Silent films can be more expressive  than sound. With just a closeup of the screaming victim. It tells the audience what is to come. As the old saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words.

 

 

 

 

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1. Pleasure Garden is a more cheerful with the ladies dancing while The Lodger has a more sinister plot with dark undertones.

 

2. The Hitchcock Style I think is the fact that he has a cameo in all of his pictures.

 

3.  The scene makes me think about Janet Liegh's character in the shower scene in Psycho which is shot in pretty much the same way with the camera at the exact angle that makes it work.

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1. Pleasure Garden is a more cheerful with the ladies dancing while The Lodger has a more sinister plot with dark undertones.

 

2. The Hitchcock Style I think is the fact that he has a cameo in all of his pictures.

 

3.  The scene makes me think about Janet Liegh's character in the shower scene in Psycho which is shot in pretty much the same way with the camera at the exact angle that makes it work.

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2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

Hitchcock has never been the type of director to have a very slow exposition. Most of his films start out with some sort of crime or vice happening. In The Lodger, the story is introduced by explaining that there has been a murder. Later on, we see the same thing. In Psycho, Marion Crane steals money from her workplace and she is murdered in the first half of the film. In North by Northwest, Roger Thornhill is already kidnapped and accused of crimes. Hitchcock always has intrigued his audiences by starting out his films with a bang, and always setting a dark tone from the very beginning. You can definitely see the heavy influence of German Expressionism in his films. German Expressionism was all about the filmmakers expressing the darkness of humanity through the plot lines as well as the actual techniques and sets used. Hitchcock's aesthetic greatly resembles German Expressionism through his art direction as well as all his characters usually being a victim to a terrible fate, which was a main theme in many of the German Expressionism films.

 

An image that stood out to me was the woman who was describing the murderer. It greatly mirrored many of the German Expressionist actors who would overact using over the top facial expressions and hand or body movements, due to lack of dialogue. Part of Hitchcock that always remained in him from the beginning until the end of his film career was his interest in the world of the macabre. The way he tells his story through his camera movements and techniques always portrays such a powerful story into the dark world that Hitchcock creates. 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

The Pleasure Garden is more uplifting. There are singing/dancing chorus girls and an audience that is enthusiastically engaged. In The Lodger, it is clearly a darker tone where the onlookers are more curious and shocked by the murder. There is more use of colors/hues in The Lodger with blues and sepia tones. One similarity I noticed is an assembly line. The chorus girls as they descend the spiral staircase and the newspaper press as the latest edition is printed and delivered.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

Point of View: We, the viewing audience, become part of the action as we ride through the streets with the newspaper delivery.

Extreme close-ups: Victims at the height of distress are often a head shot.

The charming serial killer: the Avenger in this film, Norman Bates in Psycho, Uncle Charlie in Shadow of a Doubt.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

This is an extreme close-up of a screaming woman which adds to the intensity of the situation. We see this in The Birds, when Jessica Tandy runs out of the house terrified yet too perturbed to emit a sound in her screaming. Of course there is Psycho with the intense close up on Janet Leigh as she screams.

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There are no wasted shots in the opening scenes of The Lodger and The Pleasure Garden, though there is less frenzy found in The Pleasure Garden.  Quick cuts, tight frames, and face close-ups move the action and quickly establish the story in both films.

In The Lodger Hitchcock creates a sense of chaos and fear with the constant movement -- of the crowds, the telegraph, the newspaper office, the printing press, and the traffic in the streets.  This typifies Hitchcock’s style and quickly pulls the audience into his world -- a world that he populates!  We see just his back in his first cameo.

Only the girl’s face is in the frame for the silent scream.  Hitchcock’s style is visual.  The audience doesn’t need to hear the scream.  Hitchcock chillingly and brilliantly uses this technique in Frenzy and probably most memorably in Psycho.

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I have seen the 1940s version of The Lodger and though I've seen most of Hitchcock's movies, This is my first time watching Hitchcock's The Lodger.

 

The first thing Hitchcock's developmental techniques that I noticed about this opening scene Is Hitchcock's masterful use of color filtration to help Invoke mood and furthering the feeling of tension. Did anyone else notice Hitchcock's use of sepia tone and blue filtration? This instantly reminded me of the 1960s nightmare sequence from American International Pictures House of Usher which starred Vincent Price. That movie used eerie blue filtration to create an eerie otherworldly effect.  It is amazing to think Hitch was doing this as early as the the 1920s. 

 

I of course see similarities to The Pleasure Garden: Hitch uses congested shots, close ups, shadow and unusual camera angles. 

 

The opening scream reminded me instantly of the shower scream of Janet Leigh from Psycho. 

 

I found the typewriter scene with the horror sensational headlines interesting as it built for me anticipation to want to know more but the typewriter was slower than my thoughts.  Brilliant use of anticipation to build climax. 

 

The use of technology for headlines .. the ticket taker, the paper, typewriter, people on the phone.. all these fast moving clips helps to build the theme that we live in a twisted world, we are not safe...  media sensationalism builds the drama. 

 

If I'm not mistaken I saw his Hitch's back.  Would this then be his first cameo appearance? 

 

The audience doesn't need to hear the scream.  The facial expressions, color tones, and camera angles convey the horror brilliantly. WOW! 

 

In comparing Lodger and Pleasure Garden: Lodger is by far more German and expressionist while Pleasure Garden has a more humorous feel. 

 

Lodger shows many signature Hitchcock traits.  Close ups, screams, congested mass media frenzy, color saturation (sepia blue tones) reminds me too of the eye opening scene of Vertigo with the saturated bright red tones.  We also get the charming serial killer. 

 

The extreme close up the scream  is soooo Hitch.   I just watched Birds and reminded of the silent scream of Jessica Tandy,  or the classic Janet Leigh scream in Psycho.  Looking forward to watching The Lodger tonight. 

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Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

The closeup and extreme closeup of the emotional turmoil that the woman is in, is classic Hitchcock. He wants you to experience the emotion of the character and that intense focus on the eyes helps us go on this journey with the characters. 

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Hello - 

 Daily Dose #2

 

1. Hitch likes to set up his stories early.  Like in Pleasure Garden, the Lodger begins with a series of shots giving us the setting and the tone of the story.  Pleasure Garden is light-hearted at first, whereas the tone of the Lodger thrusts us into Murder that is afoot.

    Both films use selective focus, and Hitchcock's obsession with blondes is present in both films as well, the old man admiring the "blonde" chorus girl and the murder victims are "fair haired" ("Tonight - Golden Curls")

 

The Lodger,I felt, had a few more close-ups (C/U for the non-filmmakers) and both films used crowds scenes to help set both the setting and atmosphere.  There is also a bit of fun, I thought, amid the seriousness of tone with a playful shot of the newspaper van making it appear as if it had eyes when seen from behind. And then there is the c/u scream. All this is part of the Hitchcock style.

 

What's great about the scream at the opening is the way the actress appears.  Notice the positioning of the actress, at an angle to the frame creates what would later be termed a "Dutch angle", creating a sense of unease and something is out of place.  The 1960's Batman TV show would use this type of framing in many of the villains' lairs during the run of the show.

The C/U scream will be repeated throughout Hitchcock's career, in such films as The Man who knew too much, the Birds, and Pyscho (where it is used twice if I recall).

 

- Walter

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​1. The main differences that I notice between the two opening scenes are the tone and lighting. Pleasure Gardens opens in a flirtatious and happy way, with the girls running down the stairs ready to perform in a show. The Lodger opens with a murder. the lighting is also contrasting, the light yellow for the happy Pleasure Gardens, and the dark dreary blue for a fearful and suspenseful feel. The similarities include the lack of dialogue cards, using pictures and symbols to tell the story, and the subjective point of view that the camera takes on. In Pleasure Gardens, the camera takes the view of the old man looking through the binoculars at the girls, and in The Lodger, the camera takes the view of a man working a typewriter, writing the news of the murder.

 

​2. The 'Hitchcock style' includes the use of pictures to tell the story, dramatic irony, and music to convey emotion. I think dramatic irony is a really good way to tell a story because that way you get multiple perspectives, and it builds the suspense in that you want to tell the characters what to do or watch out for. The music can really shape your emotions and change the tone of the scene.

 

​3. The scream is made intense and realistic, even with lack of sound, by the blue lens on the camera, the background music, and the camera angle. The lens, as discussed before, brings a dark feel to the shot, and the background music draws you in and makes you feel shocked and feel dread for this poor girl with the suspenseful strings. My favorite part, the camera angle, is crooked on the girl's face, which shows you that something is not right, and there is pain in that scream. your mind invents the sound without it actually being there.

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