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Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

A large part of what makes a Hitchcock film is the music and even though this was a silent film he was still able to use the soundtrack to emphasize the mood he wanted to create. A few other examples are facial expression, in this film particularly, including the woman "screaming" in the opening sequence and the jokes he throws in even when dealing with a serious topic such as murder. The example of this is the newspaper boy saying Tuesdays are his lucky day as murders always happen on Tuesdays.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

​I always feel that I am in the direct POV or almost at his shoulder.  Never do I feel simply a member of the audience.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

​I liked the pinned message from The Avenger that was carefully placed away from the weather under a wool flap and the man who positioned his lapel garnering a reaction by the witness.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

​It is clear that the woman is looking at her murderer, not at the audience.  Psycho's Marion had a similar scream from the shower as well as in Frenzy.

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1.   The opening of The Pleasure Garden is similar to the opening of The Lodger in that both tell a story visually, with limited use of language, or cards, through deliberate editing, and a series of linked disparate images, in a way to keep the viewer's mind engaged by constantly varying the subject of the image, the camera angle, the distance from the lens, the action, and other elements. Both stories  take the underbelly of society as subject, but one lyrically, the other darkly and expressionistic.

 

     The Garden has a bright and energetic opening, beginning with the dancer sequence, as they swirl down the spiral staircase, and the camera lingers on the image until until it becomes hypnotic, and this rhythmic element recurs repeatedly during the opening. The Lodger begins with flashing words -- a marquee?-- and an extended shot of a woman screaming, could be Munch's The Scream, and has a heavy, dark, moody, atmosphere, blurry, as if obscured by fog. The pace of the editing is jarring and jumpy, and immediately establishes a mood of tension and dis-ease, which continues throughout.

 

     The quality of the photography of The Pleasure Garden stays relatively bright, with a lucid clarity to the shots. The pace of the edits is relatively slower, lingering and establishing a lighter mood, playful, with a sense of humor., despite some dark undertones. The editing pace of The Lodger sets up a disturbing roll of fits and jerks that escalate the frenzy of the story. Also contributing, to the German Expressionist approach, the machine gun reporting of the journalist in the phone booth, the titles and frenzied freport of the witness, the crowd squeezing together in panic, the man mimicking the description of the killer. Another difference here between the two is the extended shot of the teletype in The Lodger, using words now to extend the story.

 

2.   Elements of the Hitchcock style: the pacing and editing of the sequences to create the mood for the story, whether a jerky, panic filled murder thriller, or a nightlife melodrama; the montage of the news going to press, or the girl getting her purse robbed; shots of human emotion intercut with images of mechanical devices that reflect a relentless, fatalistic progress. 

 

3.   The screaming woman's face is framed at a angle to unnerve the viewer in a way that might not be immediately noticeable, like the speeded up motion of the clouds, behind Norman Bate's mother's house, shows how Hitchcock ,in his mischievous way, is always trying to manipulate the viewer to create his desired effect. Other screams would include Janet Leigh in the shower scene, Tippi Hedren in the phone booth in the birds, and Cary Grant in several scenes from North by Northwest.

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1. The Pleasure Garden vs. The Lodger — I noticed the differences first. The Pleasure Garden is a much brighter and more cheerful opening sequence while The Lodger is darker and more foreboding. The use of lighting and staging set the scene for both. Everything about TPG gave us a feeling of having fun, being welcome, and enjoying a show. The Lodger, on the other hand immediately made us realize something horrible was going to happen, it did, and throughout the rest of the opening, created a feeling of doom and the macabre through the dim night lighting, tight filming spaces, dark corners, etc. There is this horrible feeling hovering over the city due to the seven murders and Hitchcock makes this evident through his dark lighting, the reflection of the man covering his face at the scene, and the frantic movements of the crowd.

 

As for similarities, again, we open with a blonde woman, the crowd scenes are fast-paced, and Hitchcock zooms in on faces often to enhance the storyline. Also, he really let the actors tell the story with minimal text interrupting the sequence of events. Finally, he gives us the feeling of being both a participant and an observer by putting us into the backstage area of TPG or giving us a first-person view of the murder, and by putting us in the audience as well as the crowd around the dead girl.

 

2. Regarding the elements of Hitchcock's style: Fast-paced crowd scenes, close up faces to enhance the emotion/action, his cameo (which I missed, but I'll take your word for it), odd filming angles that either make you comfortable or uncomfortable. I'll hopefully be able to pick up more of his style after this course.

 

3. Hitchcock's use of the screaming woman was perfect. He filmed it at an angle that made us realize she is looking at her killer. It also gave us a perfect view of her terror so there could be no mistake that she is screaming out of fear. The background lighting gave her an odd halo affect, which darkened the background and added to the feeling of darkness and horror.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The Pleasure Garden is not as dark. The Lodger uses for, darkness and moving cameras in such a way that it convenes darkness and a bleak texture. Both films have a lot of moving parts in their intros but The Lodger seems to have  amore focused energy to where people are placed and how they move.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? Camera, use of shadows and lighting. He also places a heroine in danger pretty early on.

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?  Hitchcock loved to use screaming to convey terror. There is always a sense of peril to German Expressionistic work that seems to transfer over here. The Lodger is a film filled with suspense and terror early from the get go while The Pleasure Garden seems more trivial.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

The introductions to both films are both visually interesting. They each capture our investment in the storyline up front, but with different tones. The Pleasure Garden opens with brighter lighting, happier music and wider camera angles than the Lodger to create a lighter feel and mood. The Lodger opens with a close-up of a woman in anguish, screaming. As the camera pulls away, we see an older woman who has discovered the younger woman's body, also distraught. The music is agitated and somber compared with that of The Pleasure Garden. The lighting is dark and shadowy and the camera is darting from close-ups of various people, such as the witness and policeman, to wide shots of the crowd and back again, adding to the frenzy and anxiety of the scene.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

 

Hitchcock's style is apparent in this very early example of his work from the opening moment with the close-up of the woman screaming. It sets the tone of his later movies where a crime or crimes take place at the beginning or soon after the beginning. Also, his various camera angles and showing the story from various POV and locations enhance the story's narrative.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible

scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

Framing only the woman's head, and framing it at an angle, enhances our, the viewers', feeling that she is in greater danger than if he had filmed her in a wider shot or straight. As a result, we are met with a feeling that things are awry right from the first moment. The urgent musical score which underlies the framing of the scene further enhances our concern for her. Perhaps the most obvious connection of this scene to a later one is the shower scene of Janet Leigh's in Psycho.

 

BTW, is Hitchcock the third man who enters the Telegram office hallway in the background? I couldn't be sure. But that was my best guess.

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Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The opening of the The lodger is frantic...visually you know from the beginning there is something awful going on...you are immediately put on edge. The opening of the Pleasure Garden is the total opposite you have the sense of being lead into a forbidden room of depavitiy where immoral behavior is the normal...it is expected..yes you may feel sickened by it but you want to know what is going on...with the lodger its the exact opposite..you want to be protected from the unfolding scenes.  

 

Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion

 

You immediately see the Hitchcock blonde...theme with the titles...tonight golden curls....then there is the heighten sense of urgency ..the women grabbing her throat

 

 

Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

I notice he framed it with her looking upward and to the left screaming for dear life. The scream from psycho is a carbon copy of this one . it is shot the exact same way.  with a blonde woman looking like she was caught off guard by her attacker. that is what makes it work. it is the element of surprise scream.

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I would say the opening to this compared to The Pleasure Garden is terrifying. The Pleasure Garden is giddy and excited, The Lodger is showing something terrible happening. And of course a blonde!

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Hitch is "up close and personal" with the shot of the woman screaming.  So close, all you see is her screaming face, her terror, desperation.  As only the killer would have seen....

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I see more similarities than differences between the openings of Pleasure Garden and the Lodger. First of all there is the fascination with "how things work" whether its the backstage of a show and its spiraling dancers-legs or the printing presses of a newspaper.

There is also the careful construction of point of view sequences. In Pleasure Garden its the men looking at the dancers, in Lodger the crowd (mostly men) looking at the murdered woman.

In the Lodger he's taken the typical point of view sequence apart, he's experimenting with it. A basic POV sequence is

1) shot of person looking

2) the thing the person is looking at

3) reaction shot (back to the person looking and we get the emotional reaction).

 

The shot of the woman screaming is a POV shot without the rest of the sequence: we don't see who is looking at her (assuming its is her killer). That puts the viewer in the shoes of the killer.

 

In other places we see people looking and reacting, but not what they see.

Playing with POV sequences became a standard technique in Hitchcock's movies, for which his regular editor probably deserves a lot of the credit.

https://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/power-point-view-pov-shots/

 

 

As for the tinting (the colors applied to different scenes) blue for night and sepia for day were standard tinting and toning by the early nineteen-teens

http://moviessilently.com/2015/10/24/silent-movies-101-color-before-sound-and-why-colorization-is-not-always-a-bad-thing/

 

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The Lodger and The Pleasant Garden are similar to me in that the action is very fast. There is so much going on at one time even though they are both very easy to follow due to the genius of Hitchcock. He is a master storyteller.

The huge difference in the clips are that the atmosphere is different. The Lodger is much darker. I felt such a sense of fear and dread that I did not feel in The Pleasant Garden.

The lodger also had darker cinematography which was perfect and gave me a little shiver.

 

There are so many wonderful things that are just Hitchcock to me.  His eye for detail is brilliant.  I love the way he lingers on a frame. It might be something that would seem insignificant to you at first but he makes it important because of the amount of time he has you stay. It's fun to follow the camera along from one place to the next almost as if you  were behind the camera. I love that! He takes us with him like we are in a director's couch instead of a chair.  I think that is so rare and especially in movies today.

 

 The close up where you can see her mouth moving in fear is very powerful and it reminds me of a dream where you want to scream but you can't. There are so many scenes like that in his films:

The shower scene in Psycho

Running from birds

Falling from windows

Shadows on every street

Nightmares with your eyes open

Losing a child

Trapped in a boat with a killer

A bad uncle

Chased by a plane

My personal favorite a view from a window

The list can go on and on but Hitchcock never lets you down. He doesn't even need sound to do it. I get lost in the magic of his eye.

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1.  FAST pace, lighting, use of focus/not in focus these are similarities.  Differences-I found comedy to be missing in the lodger that was used in The Pleasure Garden (ie the sleeping woman in the audience).

2.  His use of lighting, focus/out of focus, concentrations on faces-especially in crowds, and drama!

3.  Psycho, and the Birds,

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  1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

First, Hitchock is fully into creating a new art form.  Many movies from the 1920s are essentially filmed plays.  Limited sets, characters not moving much, dialogue based even though technically silent.  Here we are outside, inside, in different places, even at the printers.  We have a cross section of people groups. We have the teletype being used to tell the story. In THE PLEASURE GARDENS  we have lively dancing girls flirting with old men and pickpockets with a young ingénue.  The montage effect and expressionism are seen more in THE LODGER but this was after his exposure to those forms from Soviet Union and Germany.  In THE PLEASURE GARDENS he is having fun; here he is telling a story about humans who are being terrorized by a serial killer.  I am reminded of the beginning of M; same situation, but very different approach.    

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? The montage, or quick juxtaposition of various images at different places forces the audience psychologically to make quick connections and yet it can be overpowering; not to the extent The Battleship Potemkin is, of course, but definitely hard to pull your eyes away.  This was really innovative for its time and it’s no wonder the British audience was mesmerized.  He is also largely dealing with human people here, average people, cops, printers, delivery men, even a jerk who tries to tease the frightened woman telling her story.  In the camera work, other than Psycho and some scenes in NORTH BY NORTHWEST I don’t see much similarity visually with other Hitchcock movies.  For example, Dial M for Murder and Rope are stiff parlor dramas in comparison. 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 I really didn’t notice that it was silent; the scream was effective as silent since no one is hearing the woman’s screams before she is killed anyway, so why should we?  I was wondering if the blue and sepia tints were due to some aging process or part of the original and intentional.    She’s also at a sidewise angle, definitely a German expressionism thing.  Obviously we think of Psycho, where the music covers the screams of the victim.  The other would be the Birds, where mostly it’s children screaming in terror from an even more uncontrollable source. 

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In both opening sequences, Hitch shows multiple people reacting to the same situation in one shot.  In Pleasure Garden, we have a group reacting to women dancing on stage, whereas, in The Lodger, we have a group reacting to the news of a murder.  There’s more hustle and bustle in Lodger as opposed to Pleasure Garden in that Lodger is a new type of film for Hitchcock- it moves the audience outside where there is fog, darkness, mystery, and different lighting as opposed to the trivialness of the theatre/street in Garden.

 

Obviously the scream at the beginning!  Also, the theme of blonde women being at the center of a crime. The way that Hitch uses a group of people and their reactions to tell a story is powerful.  The image of the men sitting together reading the telegram together made me feel anxious.  I felt like I belonged with this group- waiting to know more about the horrifying situation at hand, but being forced to wait for each line to be printed.

 

 

The closeup on the woman’s face as well as the angle of the camera on her face and the way the lighting accentuated the shine on her teeth.  The was very raw and real… Other screams that come to my mind are from Psycho, the Birds, and (one of my favorites) Strangers on a Train.

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Comparing the opening of 'The Lodger' to that of 'The Pleasure Garden', it differs in that it is much more intense and dramatic, and gets the story and emotions going right away.  It is similar in the sense that it depicts events from the perspective of many different people.  Also, the story is told in quite a visual and fast moving way, which is perhaps due in part to the German film making influence on Hitchcock.

 

Re the Hitchcock style, we see a close up and graphic depiction of the scream leading to the woman's death, followed by a not-so-graphic partial shot of her lying dead afterwords... something like the shower scene in 'Psycho'.   We also see people getting different pieces of information, from eye witnesses, or wire and newspaper accounts, which will lead to different people having different versions of events.

We are yet to know the truth.  It is still a mystery.

 

What makes the scream work in a silent film is the intensity of having such a close up, showing the fear and trauma on the woman's face without revealing the cause.  The element of mystery remains.  

 

 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? The Lodger opens with an eery image that resembles a falcon shadow, cutting to a woman screaming across the frame. The audience is immediately met with excessive emotion and questioning why she is screaming. The Pleasure Garden is more playful. The audience see's women running down a staircase into a performance onstage. 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? The closeup of the actress stands out to me. Since this is a silent film, the audience is unable to hear her screams but we can see the emotion in the way she expresses her fright on camera. 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?  Her face spans across the foreground, middle ground and background of the frame. Hitchcock uses an extreme closeup to compensate for the lack of audio. 

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1.  In terms of the similarities and differences between The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger, the films are different in their dramatic styles.  The opening of The Pleasure Garden is comical while the opening of The Lodger is frightening.  Despite these genre differences both films open with visually arresting images that instantly grab the viewer’s attention.

 

Both films use a large group of people as a reaction shot to what is occurring (the men watching the dancing review and the group of onlookers to the murdered woman).  However, The Lodger uses a beautiful blue toned night scenes and sepia toned interior scenes while The Pleasure Garden is straight black and white.

 

Both films use title cards where necessary.  Both films have dressing room scenes of the women performers.  Both films have characters whose actions create some form of doubt or suspicion.  Both films have characters that are attracted to performers.

 

Both films use music to underscore and heighten the evolving beats of the film although I prefer the score in The Lodger to The Pleasure Garden.  BTW, is the score, credited to Ashley Irwin on IMDb a restored version of the original score?  It appears it was created in 1999.  Some confusion here but, in any event, the music at the 1:52 point is eerily similar to Bernard Hermann’s music in the climactic scene of Taxi Driver.

 

2.  The “Hitchcock Style” is evident in the opening scream.  It’s evident in the entire performance of Ivor Novello’s title character.  He is not what he is thought to be and is a man wrongly accused.  As for moments of excessive emotion, this seems to be a trait in many silent films.  I don’t know if this was the preferred acting style of the day, or directors were still finding how much emotion could be subtly conveyed, especially in close-ups (for comparison, see Robert Donat’s brilliant performance in The 39 Steps), or the style is a holdover from stage acting where the actor needs to project to the back row so to speak.  At the 1:21 point the woman who discovered the murdered woman is “big” in her distraught shock.

 

I’m not sure if this is a Hitchcock Style but I love following the newspaper delivery truck at the 3:27 mark.  The heads framed in the back windows is brilliant.  The effect is the back of the truck is like a face that is looking at the viewer.   This continues with the subsequent cut to the inside of the truck silhouetting the driver and passenger while establishing a POV shot of the street activity.  I see this kind of shot coming up in They Live By Night (Nicholas Ray) and Guncrazy (Joseph H. Lewis).

 

3.  The scream works well because it is shot from a high camera angle.  We’ll see this again in The 39 Steps and Psycho.

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1. As far as similarities go, Hitchcock uses editing to lead you through the narrative, as do many silents. The older woman who sees the killer looks at the victim, the victims clothes are pulled back to reveal the pinned note - The Avenger. Very similar technique to his use of it to direct you from ogling man to dancer to ogling man to dancer. In both scenes, he propels you through the scene without the written word.

 

Now, I recognize one might argue that the text of the note is written, but the point is not the words, it is the M.O. of the killer, staking a claim to his guilt. The text of the note is actually used to propel the story forward as it relates to the sensationalism surrounding the serial killer's actions. It's a different device than the editing used to connect the victim to the witness.

 

Also, I think the use of the darkness in both serves as a metaphor for the dangers of the world out there in both sequences. Young actress alone in the dark alley or street is victimized by shady characters stealing her letter. Sinister, deadly events occurring in the streets of London related to an innocent woman being victimized. 

 

When she walks into the theater, the image brightens and our focus changes to a different kind of danger as a helpful guy sees the lady in distress and plans to manipulate the situation to his advantage. Similarly, in The Lodger scene, the warm tones of the newspaper office as the reporter phones in his story remove us from the immediate threat, but introduce us to a new threat - a sensationalistic media looking to exploit the tragedy for their own advantage.

 

Differences exist in the tone of each film - comedy vs suspense. There is absolutely nothing funny about a serial killer.

 

2. I'd have to say it's his reliance on editing. My understanding of montage is connecting various scenes to create a new story. Certainly cutting rapidly between scenes of the mob at the crime scene, the reporter in the phone booth, the editor in the newsroom, the printers running off copies of the special edition, the cars speeding through the streets to deliver the news...excellent use of editing to propel the action forward without dialogue and create a sense of managed hysteria. 

 

Also, his use of odd angles at the crime scene, the distinctions between light and dark all help create a sense of imbalance, something he relied on throughout his career. 

 

3. The scream is held for a long time, her head is tilted upwards and at an angle and reminds me exactly of the scream of Janet Lee in the shower as Norman murders her. I don't know if I would have noticed this if Rich hadn't used it in one of his lecture videos. 

 

 

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1.) The Pleasure Garden begins with a burlesque performance and it was delightful to watch the scene with bevy of chorus girls. Whereas, The Lodger begins with an eerie essence. The opening scene from The Lodger begins with a screaming blonde woman. One can assume that crime has taken place after the police questions the witness, followed by the description of the Ripper and the murder spreading like wild fire.

 

2.) Hitchcock is very much interested with closeup shots. This particular scene begins with a closeup shot of the blonde woman. It must be that years later Hitchcock brings a closeup shot in Rear Window with Grace Kelly which is one of the most beautiful shots ever taken.

 

 

3.) The screaming blonde woman is a reminisce where Hitchcock used in his later movies. Example: The scream of Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) in the shower scene from Psycho has became infamous and it has played a significant part in pop culture.

 

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The Lodger's opening scene was more sinister and dark and The Pleasure Garden started more playful. 

 

The opening with the focus on the girl's scream sets the tone and sucks you in.  You know right away that something bad has happened to the girl and want to keep watching to find out what/who.  Other images that come to mind are the shower scene in Psycho and The Birds.  

 

 

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1. Some of the similarities between The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger clips can be found in the close-ups highlighting the faces of certain characters. Both clips also include frenzied cuts from one image to another. But instead of the excited nature of the characters in The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger quick and frenzied cuts add a far more ominous tone to this film than the previous example. 

 

2. It doesn't really have to do with Hithcock's style or perhaps it is the early establishment of what would become that style, but I noticed the way in which Hitch gives us information that would have normally been presented on simple title cards. For instance, the flashing lights of "To-night" or the information of a killer on the loose presented through the typewriter. One could argue that Hitch's background in advertising influenced the various ways he was able to incorporate title card info without using the same look as most other silent films. 

 

As far as the Hitchcock style goes, I found myself thinking of the shower scene in Psycho upon seeing the opening shot of the murdered girl in The Lodger. Also, one can see the influence of German Expressionism in Hitch's use of shadows throughout the film. Seeing the titular character for the first time, I was reminded of the dark, pit-like eyes of Cesare from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. Furthermore, the influence of Soviet montage was instantly evident in the cuts between various images of a city in panic.

 

3. The face of the murdered woman conveys plenty of emotion making sound/dialogue unnecessary. Again, I'm reminded of the shower scene from Psycho by the way in which both screaming faces leave an emotional impact on the viewer. 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


 


I struggled to see any similarities between the two movies, but the difference that really caught my eye was the tone: one was playful and fun, the other was frenzy and fear. 


 


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


 


The color really caught my eye. Outside scenes were blue, and inside scenes were an amber color. I found it a bit distracting and found myself paying more attention to the colors instead of the story. Maybe that is that influence of German Expressionism where the emphasis is more on the technique than the people? 


 


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


 


Honestly, all I could think about as I watched that scene was how unconvinced I was that she was terrified. I got that she was supposed to be screaming but it took me a second to realize that. My first thought was, why is this woman standing there with her mouth open? I haven't seen enough of Hitchcock's later work to compare it. Hopefully the acting gets better later on.


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Daily Dose #2: To-night Golden Curls

Opening Scene from Hitchcock's The Lodger (1927)

 

1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

- In comparing the openings of The Lodger to The Pleasure Garden, the sound affects were very different. One was joyful music while the other was scary. In the Lodger there was a lot of emotions and fear. The title repeating itself. Joy and excitement began in The Pleasure Garden. Similarities were described as a dark evil appeared in both films - one with death and the other with robbery.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

- In this sequence the "Hitchcock style" showed dark shadow lighting in its first shot of the little girl screaming as well as when the newspaper truck was flying down the street. They both emphasized despair and anguish. The creation of suspense was displayed throughout the film with the questioning of the witness to the man that had his head wrapped up to even the reporters getting the story out.

 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you

notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no

audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's

later work? 

 

- Bringing the woman's screaming expression directly to your face on the screen in this silent film

makes it work as well as the eerie sound of the music. Psycho comes to mind from Hitchcock's later

work when the woman is in the shower and is being stabbed by the Bates Motel owners son.

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