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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The similarities are the blond females, although you don't know for sure if the murder victim is a show girl, the marquee ( neon sign?) gives you that impression. It's possible that the dead woman is in show biz. The use of music in both films help to create the atmosphere or mood of the scenes. 

 

The crowds, one an audience the other viewing a crime scene, but both are done with the use of similar camera angles. 

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

He tells a story visually with very few title designs - the marquee, the telegraph print out, the signs on the back of the delivery trucks - all let us know what is going on without breaking up the picture or scene with title designs - allowing the movement and tension to be continuous.

 

I see the influence of the German film makers - the machinery of the printing press reminds me of German films depicting industrial machines.

 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

What makes it work is showing just her face and the terror in her eyes. The use of music or chords to depict the sound of her scream.

I also notice Hitchcock uses music in other scenes to help tell the story. The typing sound or ticking sound when you first see the reporter in the phone booth.  The telegraph keys look a bit like piano keys and you hear a bit of piano being played. You can also hear the sound of typing when we see what the telegraph machine is printing out. 

The other screams that comes to mind is Psycho of course - in that one he uses violins to go along with Janet Leigh's screams. 39 Steps he uses a train.

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 “To-night Golden Curls” is on the menu literally. An advertisement announcing the inevitable death and public exploitation of death is how Hitchcock follows his powerful tilt-screen close-up opening scream; a shot like the Psycho shower scene. The public is going to devour this with a frenzy and in the end also become a victim of sorts. Again like in Pleasure Garden, Hitchcock is quick to set his stage and doesn’t have to linger on long character development or back story.  Art imitates life as Hitchcock’s awareness of marketing and mass appeal plays out in this sequence. True to German Expressionist form, this sequence in the Lodger is one in which Hitchcock illustrates the giant mechanical process of reporting to the masses, and subsequent psychological affect of such dark information. Here is the exploitation of an inhuman act, but also how through media, the victim loses their true identity to the way in which the public preys upon her just as the murderer. What is interesting is that the murderer is known as “The Avenger”, so what could possibly justify this act. The suggestion that there may be some explanation or possible way we could sympathize with the murder. What heinous act was committed against murderer? What are they avenging? When the public is scarred it fosters a range of reactions, for example the man who mocks the elderly witness to the crime. His actions further display the affect of exploitation, but also a real fear within. Hitchcock make such a comprehensive assessment of a public reaction here.  So content wise, this is true Hitchcock. In terms of the visual, there are quick cuts back and forth between machinery and man doing the work of pushing information. Sure the darkness and harsh contrast in lighting are there, but also the voyeuristic binocular effect as see in the shot from inside the newspaper wagon. The vignette created as if we were sitting behind the drivers acts like the focused lens of a telescope which we see in Rear Window, or Dial M, and North by Northwest and comments on how fascinated we are when bad things happen.

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I watched The Lodger yesterday and it's a great picture, heavily influenced by the German Expressionism.

The greater similarity I see between this scene and the former is the interest Hitchcock seems to have in the public's reaction: the men watching the girls dancing in The Pleasure Garden and the reaction of the public towards the recent murder in this one, but the difference lies on the nature of the situations and reactions, one is much lighter while the other is a lot darker. The interesting thing in this film is that no murder is actually shown, Hitchcock clearly prefer to focus on the despair of the public instead.

And the woman screaming is a big exponent of Hitchcock's style, he shows panic like no one else due mostly to his clever choice for close up, and of course the most famous cinematic female scream comes to mind: Janet Leighs in Psycho.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden ​- what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

The opening of The Pleasure Garden was more of an innocent and simplistic evening that features some of the later Hitchcock trademarks later found in his films that took place at an English Music Hall. The opening of The Lodger takes place in the streets of London where the crowd witnesses the body of a dead blonde and news starts to spread like wildfire in the course of five minutes. 

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

 

Elements of the Hitchcock style that I have noticed include: The use of the blonde, POV camera shots, use of montage, limited amount of inter titles in between shots, authority figures arriving at the scene of the crime, and the setup of the murder and the news spreading throughout London by sequencing the images visually in storyboards.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream is heard? And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

The shot is framed to give a distorted view of what the audience sees in their mindset of a woman who was under the hands of a murderer. The scream is a reminder of what The Avenger is looking at before he disposes the victim and after the murder, he escapes into the night and leaves a clue behind to let them know who is committing these horrendous crimes, as a sort of warning call. When it comes to screams like that I think of: The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), Young and Innocent (1937), Torn Curtain (1966), and Frenzy (1972), which I think is suitable for this film, because Frenzy had a similar sequence that was similar to The Lodger. 

 

 

Edited by BLACHEFAN
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The opening scene of The Lodger is similar to the opening of The Pleasure Garden in that they both have a female main character with a particular focus of having blonde curly hair.  In The Pleasure Garden, we are bombarded with the visual brightness of the blond hair and the mention of the beautiful curl as noticed by her gawker. In The Lodger, however, it is not really shown to us, but it is mentioned several times in text, with repeating flashing lights that read “To-night Golden Curls” and later in the police report that the victim was “fair-haired”. Both movies have rapid circular movements (also reminiscent of the out-of-control merry-go-round climax in Strangers on a Train). As mentioned yesterday in The Pleasure Garden, the dancers come down the stairs with a spiraling motion, their arms move in a circular manner and their dance is even circular. In the Lodger, the big machines printing the news scoop are also moving rapidly in an overwhelming circular manner (a set of stairs is also visible here). In addition, there is a very large fan that spins and cools the newsroom. The thing that is different here is the manner in which this circular repetition is revealed to us. In The Pleasure Garden, it is all human. In The Lodger, it becomes machinery; the flashing lights of the words about the showgirl (instead of the actual showgirl) the telegraph machine which seems to be typing all on it’s own, the news story seemingly printing autonomously by the large machines and carried through an entourage of identical vehicles, driven by faceless drivers. The telegraph typing even reveals an additional clue to the murder; that this person is the 7th victim. This move to the machinery telling the story is indicative of the German Expressionism influence, the dehumanizing of the characters to make the story have more power and emotion. The printing press is telling us the story directly, where the human  witness could not (or at least struggled). 

 

The shifting points of view is also something that is a signature scene for Hitchcock. We see the cars from the front coming at us, on after another, then we see them from behind as if we are one car in the line of this factory line of cars, and then we are actually in the car. We don't really know where we are because the point of view keeps changing. That amazing shifting can be heard also in the sound. The scream in the beginning is a lower pitch continuous sound with a repeating circular shrill on top. Somewhere, I believe by the news room, that changes to a continuous high pitch sound, with a menacing repeating low bass or drum beat, then it shifts again to the continuous low with the repeating shrieking on top. We see this in the shower murder scene in Psycho where the now famous squealing knife sound shrieks throughout the scene. The flashing sign of lights in a dark night of “To-night Golden Curls” is reminiscent of the Bates Motel sign in Psycho. Finally, as in Psycho, we have a murder of a female committed near the beginning of the movie by someone who covers his face and/or disguises himself with possibly female clothing. It said a “scarf” here in this scene, which doesn’t necessarily mean a woman’s article of clothing, but possibly. I’ll know when I see the movie! :)

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The similarities are that both feature women with golden curls and the many people who observe them. But in such different ways! In the Pleasure Garden, the man attracted to the girl with the golden curl wants to get to know her much better, whereas in The Lodger, the Jack-the-Ripper-like serial killer (whom we do not see yet) wanted to kill her (and did). Of course, the subsequent reactions of the observers are therefore markedly different in the two films.  

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

I found it interesting that Hitchcock felt that this movie was the first time he had exercised his own style, which obviously drew upon what he had learned from D. W. Griffith, German expressionism, and Russian montage. The techniques that stood out for me were the lighting, the camera angles, and the fast-paced editing. The images that stood out for me were the opening silent scream, the guy in the bar who obscured his face by pulling up his coat collar, and the churning newspaper press.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

​Hitchcock frames the shot so tightly that one can almost see the girl's tonsils quivering as she screams, and he films her at an off-kilter angle, which makes it even more unsettling. I haven't seen many Hitchcock movies - the only other one I have seen that had a scream was "Psycho" (Janet Leigh).  

 

 

​4. Bonus question: Can you spot Hitchcock's first cameo?

 

​No. Not only no, but heck no! Even after reading Strutter1974's post which identifies where the cameo begins, I could not see Hitchcock in the film! I am trying to console myself with the thought that I shouldn't be expected to know what the back of Hitchcock's head looked like in 1926 (when he had dark hair), but I am starting to think that I am not very observant or that I look at different things than everyone else. I did not see the "no smoking" sign in yesterday's daily dose (even though it was enormous) because I was focusing on the cigar smoker instead. In today's daily dose, I did not catch that "To-night Golden Curls" was a theater advertisement for the girl killed by the Avenger (I picked this up from reading comments posted by my more perceptive classmates). When the teleprinter machine was spelling out the message about the crime, I found myself trying to figure out how its impact printer worked and missed seeing much of the message it was transmitting (I had to rewatch that part, ha ha).

 

​5. Bonus unsolicited comment: I am a big fan of Laird Cregar, and I have watched the version of The Lodger that he starred in 1944. I did not know that Alfred Hitchcock had made this silent version in 1926!  

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?


 


Both openings include crowds before the film finally focuses on an individual. I think that is part of the storytelling techniques Hitchcock uses throughout his films.  An average person is plucked from the masses.  Then the average person experiences extraordinary circumstances.


 


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?


 


Within both clips, there are scenes that connects people with people with machinery.  In the opening shot of the please garden, the girls descending the spiral staircase looks like part of a moving mechanics cal part.  Likewise the newspaper printing scene that focus on moving mechanical parts.  Both scenes remind of clips within Fritz Lang's Metropolis and Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times. Each of those films have similar scenes that show the mechanization of society by integrating machines and people.


 


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?


 


Of course, the first scream that comes to mind is Janet Leigh in Psycho.  The framing of the face is claustrophobic in both films and reflects the intensity of the panic, horror, and fear of the person.


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1.       The most obvious difference between the last two Daily Doses would be tone, PLEASURE GARDEN starting as lighter, upbeat, jovial, while THE LODGER is darker, more serious and menacing.  Both films do, however, make use of blonde (and even more specifically curly blond haired) women as subject matter and as objects of men’s obsession.

 

2.       As far as the Hitchcock style, the reflection shot of the man mimicking the killer in THE LODGER is foretelling of Hitchcock’s use of reflections or viewing through lenses in many of his movies, for example in NORTH BY NORTHWEST with Cary Grant’s reflection in the tv screen, or the reflection of the murder in the glasses in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN.  Also, the windows of the newspaper truck appear as though eyes, reminding me of Hitchcock’s voyeuristic element of looking or watching.  THE LODGER also displays Hitchcock’s fascination of the macabre, and of darker areas of human psychology and behavior.

 

3.       Hitchcock frames the opening scream in THE LODGER in extreme close-up and in a canted camera angle to maximize its impact.  It is a more grotesque, expressionistic view.  The woman’s expression and eyes are also that of terror, and she is looking up, putting her in a lower, more vulnerable position to that of her attacker.  Hitchcock has also preceded this shot with what appears to be the shadow of a figure emerging in an urban atmosphere, utilizing Eisenstein’s ideas of juxtaposing two images to create a third idea.  With an eye to the future, this does bring to mind the shower scene and scream from PSYCHO.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


  With both films, it seems they open with some kind of chaos; the girls rushing down the stairs for their performance, and the victim in her final moments. The most obvious difference is the use of light a shadow (maybe a screen?) for the films. The Pleasure Garden was bright to depict 'show quality' and style. The Lodger was darker impression, to show a more darker content, and sets the 'in the shadows of the night' vibe. 


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


I've noticed so far with both films that he uses some form of print to present an idea of what's happening next (the letters and newspapers for Patsy, the typist at the typewriter for the newsroom) as opposed to title cards. He also uses what I feel to be background items to help the audience form an opinion about a character (the dog with Mr. Levet, the lodger being upset by the photos in the room). Stairs is another thing I noticed... the opening sequence of Pleasure Garden, and the man slowly ascending the stairs of the house in the Lodger- like big things are coming when you see a set of stairs! 


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


 


I think what works for the 'silent scream' in this film is the angle in which the scene is shot. We are looking down on the woman, giving the impression that someone is looming over her. I again personally feel a lot of the emotion in some of his scenes are seen through the eyes of the actors- very expressive faces. The most infamous scream scene that comes to mind is the shower scene in Psycho!


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I thought The Lodger and The Pleasure Garden were similar in that they were both fast paced.  The women had audiences only in The Lodger they were watching her dead. I felt that the camera angles were similar in that they focused on the fast paced quality of the action.  I can't describe how Hitchcock did this because I don't have the technical background.  I can only describe the impact I felt.  The Lodger was at night so the lighting was darker but it seemed darker throughout.  Perhaps film quality.  I apologize that I do not have a more formal education and can't discuss in more technical terms.  

 

Again, in The Lodger the camera angle focused on the woman being killed from above.  Then the crowds.  I really felt like I was part of the crowds and was swept up in the activity including as the footage progressed to the newspaper delivery.  Again, a particular woman with people watching.  

 

The scream of the woman - I thought of Psycho and The Birds.  

 

I felt like I wanted to continue to see the action.  The fear and concern of the people involved me.  I felt like this movie was sort of cut up into quicker action scenes than The Pleasure Garden.  Again, please excuse my limited language in regard to movie making.  I hope to learn a lot!  Thank you!

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  1. The Lodger and The Pleasure Garden have complete different tones to start. Right to the point The Lodger emits a score that is alarming as we are given a quick shot of a shadowy figure, a nod to German Expressionism the figure’s shape is unreal but has the features of a what should be a Man’s build, then fade into the face of a horrified woman staring down certain death. The flashing title cards of To-night “Golden Curls” gives the impression of the Killer singing as he murders her. Were as The Pleasure Garden opens with a playful score and high-spirited ensemble of blonde women descending for a performance. The only common trait from these two films is blondes being featured prominently. 
  2. The Lodger has a thrilling score start it off pulling us in this type of music becomes a trademark throughout his filmography. His thrillers use music to heighten the scene. On first viewing I also noticed a quick nod towards Hitchcock’s dark sense of humor when the Man tries to impersonate the killer’s look and scare the old woman in the reflection as a joke  thats seen in poor taste right after a murder. The use of silhouetted figures is something Hitch employs in later films. Also Hitchcock’s first cameo as the man working at his desk on the phone his back to us.
  3. The shot is a extreme close up and is centered on her mouth and eyes, its called to your attention immediately as they tremble, the eyes are flooded with dread. Also the use of the rousing score erupts in a manner similar to a scream. Its very similar find to the shower scene in Psycho, the extreme close up of the face and the thrilling score that screams for her and us

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Comparing the two view scenes, we can mention some data. In both films there are allusions to blond women and music hall.  Both moves of shots with close-ups to emphasize a scene, item or situation. A technique that will later be repeated in many films of Hitchcock.  While in The pleasure garden there are intertitles, for the brief conversation, and presentation of characters, this does not happen in The lodger, the images speak for themselves, and the protagonists are crime, the news of the crime, the impact of the crime on people (who acts collectively) and the possible appearance of the criminal. The first scenes, with planes through the mist of the corpse, the woman who yells, and policemen, have an aspect of nightmare, expressionist influence clearly.  The woman shouting, scene similar to the discovery of the corpse in The 39 steps, is a very strong visual and dramatic element.

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Hitchcock likes to use a lot of tight reaction shots on the actor's faces which i think helps to draw us into their emotions, thoughts, & motivations. Spielberg does the same thing, but Spielberg goes a little overboard with it imo, while Hitch seems to know how to temper it sparingly with the action of the film.

I saw those reaction shots of the actors in both of these films we watched. Hitch also uses a lot of humor to break up the tension, a technique we see in a lot of films & TV shows nowadays. I think this is a very effective tool in storytelling.

The opening shot of a woman screaming does not require sound, because her expressions & actions carry the story along perfectly.

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1. Comparisons of openings:

Super close-up shots pull us into the scene in both films. The crowds that build...voyeurs to the unfolding events grab us and push us into the melee. The crowds engulf the whole frame and though we can't see anything in that shot, we become part of the crowd, almost waiting...at a distance to get a glimpse.

 

2. Hitch's style:

- Real life drama - girls working the stage; a girl murdered on the street. All plausible events.

- Rapid cuts set the emotional tone whether it's a sense of urgency, panic, horror and fear. We breath at the pace of those cuts.

- The use of machinery - The printing press looms large and in a frenzy as the paper tightly feeds through it with the details of this murder. And yet when the papers are loaded on the truck they are tossed like light, powerless bundles.

 

3. Even if we didn't hear a scream, the super close-up conveys all of the emotion of the scene. We see and hear the scream in this film and see it again in Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much and To Catch A Theif, just to name a few films. In each case there is a super close up and one long, loud scream. It's as if that one scream embodies all of the anguish we need to know...for that moment.

 

4. Bonus - hard to tell where Hitch is. Maybe it's his back and head we see in the newspaper office...the guy on the phone. It's not like Hitch to place himself in a huge crowd. His cameos always showed him more singular...away from everyone else...occupying his own part of the scene. So that's my guess though I am not 100% certain.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

What is similar is the camera looking down, but this is a close-up, from the killer's perspective.  The Pleasure Garden is filmed above, but far away.  God's perspective.  . . .

 

 

I notice that many people mentioned that the woman screaming was the woman who was murdered. I have not yet seen The Lodger, and I did not assume that the two were one and the same. I guess I'll find out when I see the film, and I am looking forward to it!

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There are obvious echoes of the opening of The Pleasure Garden, with the flashing lights advertising a theatrical revue and the emphasis on blonde women.

 

Several things strike me in this opening. One is that the opening shot of the girls screaming (presumably as she is about to be murdered) is taken from the killer's POV. This choice implicates the audience immediately in their "unseemly" interest in the dark goings-on. Same with the sequence of how the news spreads, although this clip stops short of the "hot over the aerial" scene, in which listeners of various kinds listen with dread and relish to the description of the murders.

 

That's AH with his back to us, sitting at a desk with a telephone. The interesting thing that I notice this time is that he seems to be giving direction with his hand gestures, and the window toward which he is turned, and which we see from the same POV as he does, is shaped very much like a movie screen with "action" going on on the other side. This is an early evocation of the window/movie frames in Rear Window and the framing devices he uses at crucial points in 39 Steps, Notorious, etc. And it certainly marks his cameo as a kind of director/artist's signature to his work.

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1. Comparisons of openings:

Super close-up shots pull us into the scene in both films. The crowds that build...voyeurs to the unfolding events grab us and push us into the melee. The crowds engulf the whole frame and though we can't see anything in that shot, we become part of the crowd, almost waiting...at a distance to get a glimpse.

 

2. Hitch's style:

- Real life drama - girls working the stage; a girl murdered on the street. All plausible events.

- Rapid cuts set the emotional tone whether it's a sense of urgency, panic, horror and fear. We breath at the pace of those cuts.

- The use of machinery - The printing press looms large and in a frenzy as the paper tightly feeds through it with the details of this murder. And yet when the papers are loaded on the truck they are tossed like light, powerless bundles.

 

3. Even if we didn't hear a scream, the super close-up conveys all of the emotion of the scene. We see and hear the scream in this film and see it again in Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much and To Catch A Theif, just to name a few films. In each case there is a super close up and one long, loud scream. It's as if that one scream embodies all of the anguish we need to know...for that moment.

 

4. Bonus - hard to tell where Hitch is. Maybe it's his back and head we see in the newspaper office...the guy on the phone. It's not like Hitch to place himself in a huge crowd. His cameos always showed him more singular...away from everyone else...occupying his own part of the scene. So that's my guess though I am not 100% certain.

 

I thought Hitchcock was the man with his back to the viewer, in the newspaper office. I assumed that the man on the phone was the reporter calling in his story to the newspaper and thus would be a recurring character. I don't think Hitchcock ever played a recurring character in his movies.

 

I have not yet seen The Lodger so I don't know if the reporter is a recurring character, but darn I am curious about the film now!

 

In any case, I hope someone can give us the answer.

 

From a post from Strutter1974:

Bonus question answer: You can catch Hitch at the 2:47 mark of this clip, in a stock film looking scene at the newspaper office. He is at a desk, talking on the phone, with his back to the camera, another Hitch Touch. I loving playing the Find The Hitch game!

Edited by Marianne
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3. Even though this is a silent film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock’s later work?

In this instance, I think one has to credit both the actress doing the screaming and the director filming her scream in a choker close-up. That scene must have been even more dramatic on the big screen, in a theater and not on a computer screen or a smartphone. Others on this thread have already mentioned Janet Leigh screaming in Psycho, and I think the woman screaming in that close-up can compare to the shots of Tippi Hedren in The Birds, when she is in the restaurant and when she is trapped in the phone booth.

 

Additional Thoughts:

1. Was the blue tint that we saw in this clip part of the original film? I thought it worked well for the subject matter, but I wasn’t sure if it was Hitchcock’s intention to use blue tint for the original film.

2. The very first image in the clip, even before the woman screaming, seems to have been part of the film’s opening, and those jagged shapes made me think of German expressionism, specifically The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari.

I agree with your comments in # 3.

As to your additional thoughts concerning the blue tint, I played the clip along side the full film on YouTube (The Lodger (1927) Alfred Hitchcock, 1080p) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qFiw5VtmyI

The blue tint in the clip does not appear in the YouTube film. Also, the clip runs 4 minutes 16 seconds and ends. In the film, the same clip lasts 6 minutes and 37 seconds. The clip, I believe is sped up.

Now like you, I’m wondering, which edited version was his intention?

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The similarities between the two films is the close-up on the focal point of the film. In The Pleasure Garden it is the girl chorus and in the lodger it is the scream of the woman. The differences there are no text used in the opening sequence of The Pleasure Garden and in The Loder there is multiple usage of text

 

In regards to the elements of Hitchcock Style, the image of the dead body and the individual image of the faces in the crowd and the emotions on the faces of the men as they read the telegraph message.

 

The opening image is a close up of terror and it reminds of the scene in Psycho were Vera Miles character screams upon finding the mummified body of Ms. Bates but her scream is replaced with the screeching music of the sound score.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

Well, there's for sure a lot of energy present in both opening scenes -- no slow build or anything. The viewer gets drawn right into key events that are already in progress. It reminds me of how things happen in real life. You're just going about your business. Then you turn a corner, wander into a shop, or come across a bunch of people gathered together and stop for a while to see what's going on. (I suppose that's part of what makes me feel like a voyeur or a "looky-loo" when I watch a Hitchcock film, these included.)

 

The biggest difference for me has to do with the mood. It's obviously very playful in The Pleasure Garden. We're there to check out some dancers, have a good time, and maybe enjoy a laugh. I feel part of the action in that I want to be there and share in everyone else's fun night. With The Lodger, it's tense and frightening. I feel just as engaged, but it's because I don't want to be there. I do, on the other hand, want to find out what happened so that I can avoid winding up like Golden Curls. In that way, I feel like part of the problem -- that crowd that will probably wind up spreading and believing "fake news" because they're just that desperate to know and pass it on.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

The extreme close-ups stuck out the most for me. It puts me into the shoes of characters that are already part of the scene (whether they're seen or unseen) and makes me feel involved sooner and to a greater degree, I think. It's both exciting and unsettling at the same time. For instance, I'm not terribly enthused as a person at the idea of looking into the face of a woman I'm probably about to kill and "hearing" her scream (or picturing that happening to her, if that's what's indeed going on instead), but I'm forced to experience the energy and emotion that would come along with doing that anyway.

 

There is something quite interesting about that -- putting the viewer straight into the shoes of voyeuristic characters doing questionable things and encouraging identification -- that Hitch does very well. The same thing goes for being part of a crowd discussing something as upsetting as murder and listening to firsthand accounts from someone that allegedly saw it happen.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

It's that dang close-up. Like I said in my answer to the second question, it makes you feel like you're literally right there. You pick up on all the nuances of the woman's face and get the full impact of that emotion she's expressing when you're that close. You can't help it. It happens whether you're comfortable with it or not and it's quite powerful.

 

The music does an excellent job of emphasizing what's going on as well. The instruments sound frantic and frenzied -- very much like a scream. It's like with the stabbing shower scene in Psycho. The scene is so well cut, well scored, and artfully done overall, that you don't quite notice you never once see a blade sink into any flesh. You're certainly left feeling as if you did though! Hitchcock does a great job of implying things without having to spell them right out for the viewer. He makes some seriously smart suggestions and lets your imagination fill in the blanks.

 

As far as other screams that are similar? I think of Marion Crane getting stabbed to death in the shower in Psycho. (I'm struggling to totally remember, but I don't think you hear her screaming.) Also Melanie Daniels getting pecked at by seagulls in The Birds. I don't think we actually hear her screaming either. Honestly though, I guess I've never considered whether or not I've actually heard some of the iconic Hitchcock screams I'm thinking of with my actual ears. I always assumed I had, but now I'm not as sure. 

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2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

The first thing that really illicited strong feelings in me was the close-up of the woman screaming, and then the words "To-Night Golden Curls" flashing a few times on the screen followed by the woman dead. 

 

I am looking forward to reading everyone's thoughts, because I feel I'm still not able to really discern German influence yet. 

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Hitchcock's use of music in "The Lodger" is what first struck me as a strong example of the "Hitchcock style." I'm thinking of Hitchcock's 1956 version of "The Man Who Knew Too Much." Doris Day's creepy "Que Sera Sera" is all over that film, together with the sound design, it really drives the suspense and the tight emotions that follow. I got that same feeling from the music in "The Lodger." The scream: there is nothing like a silent scream to disturb one's sensibilities. The way Hitchcock frames the woman's face -- very close in and askew -- throws the viewer off even more. I can't help but think about Jessica Tandy in "The Birds" when she discovers Mr. Fawcett's dead body with his eyes pecked out -- the horror of it all is that she's so shocked by the sight, nothing comes out of her mouth but we know she's screaming inside, heck, I scream every time I watch that scene!

 

Relative to the "Hitchcock style" in "The Lodger," the perspective/POV of driving, where he puts the viewer in the car with the driver in some fashion reminds me of other Hitchcock movie scenes: Cary Grant driving drunk; Tippi Hedren driving to Bodega Bay; I'm sure there are others, but tense driving scenes seem to be a thing for Hitchcock.
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1.      One element shared by the openings of The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger is a focus on faces in the crowd. In The Pleasure Garden, the camera traveled down the row, looking at the faces of the middle-aged patrons. In The Lodger, the camera looks among the crowd reacting to the death of another “fair-haired girl” (a show girl, as in The Pleasure Garden) The opening of The Pleasure Garden plays more with distance, occasionally looking at the stage from far above. This section of The Lodger is usually pretty close. It is perhaps furthest away when watching the printing press.

2.      We again have a focus on the man being aggressive with a young, pretty blonde woman, something that will show up throughout Hitchcock’s work, certainly through Vertigo and Psycho. We also get a point-of-view shot from a moving car, something we will see again in several films, including Notorious, Vertigo, and Psycho. Although it’s not characteristic of a lot of Hitchcock films, the fogginess of London in The Lodger provides both verisimilitude and a nice veil of mystery for the identity of The Avenger.

3.      The canted angle for the close-up of the screaming woman helps make the situation more chaotic and immediate, alarming us that a corpse has been discovered. Of course this comes many years before Doris Day’s life-saving Albert Hall scream in The Man Who Knew Too Much and Janet Leigh’s life-ending screams in Psycho.

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My observations are so similar to your #2 answer. I noticed the "eyes" , color change, rushing and fluid movement of cars and people and machines. This is a very interesting course!

 

The use of the different tints was very common in silent films and an audience of the time would probably be familiar with the uses of tinting. Blue was used to indicate exterior at night and sepia for interior shots. Other tints such as red, brown , and green would also be used in some films.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

One obvious similarity is the 'golden curl' which is literal in The Pleasure Garden, and presumably some theatrical which is playing nearby the scene of the murder in The Lodger.

 

Another interesting element is that the opening shot of the victim screaming could easily have been read as a singer singing, especially given the juxtaposition of the 'golden curls' title.

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

There is a use of montage the Hitchcock drops into as he wants to show the spread of the story of the murder. He lines up many short cuts to act as a breadcrumb trail, from the phone booth at the scene to the editor receiving the call, back to the phone booth, but this time at mid range to focus on the reporter telling the story, then on from there to the distribution of the paper. There also seems to be a suggestion that some of the elements shown are happening in parallel -- many things happening at the same time.

 

The coloring of the shots, with a blue tint for the night shots at the scene and the interior warmer colors show Hitchcock playing with the emerging format to drive setting and mood.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

What makes the singing woman a screaming woman in the opening shot is the close up and the angle of the shot being crooked. The closeness suggests an intimacy that wouldn't be there in a performance -- typically you would shoot that from further away.

 

The diagonal suggests that something is off. Something is not right. This helps make it a scream.

 

The shot is similar to the scream from Psycho, but interestingly, that scene isn't shot at an angle for the scream...on the other hand, you can hear it!

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