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Hitch certainly had a penchant for victimizing pretty, blonde women. They're prominent in both The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger. I can understand why Hitchcock considers this his first film that employs his signature style. The dark, moody cinematography; dramatic and frightening score (fun fact: I saw this film in a theatre performed with a live band); and frenetic performances evoke feelings of trauma and suspense, as if something's lurking around the corner and no one's safe. The opening shot of the victim screaming is set at a diagonal, perhaps meant to convey a sense of disorder. It's reminiscent of the harsh and bold shots of Marion Crane and Melanie Daniels as they are attacked by a knife-wielding madman in Psycho and a swarm of laser-focused birds in The Birds, respectively.

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1. Both films exploit the public's reaction: the men's leering in The Pleasure Garden and the spread of knowledge and fear from the frenzied bystanders. The cutting to various characters turns industrial as we move from the telegraph to the printing press and ultimately ride in the delivery truck.

2. I noticed the double shots on the telegraph. He did this in shots of three later in The Birds most noticeably. You look; you look closer. Subtle impact. And phone booths as a way to expand the story. The Lodger also shows his love of text and including the viewer in the next insight.

3. This shot shows such intensity on the actress's face. Her eyes and the slight shaking of her head as she screams in fear are easily conveyed to the audience as she fills the frame.

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In the opening scene of The Lodger, Hitchcock puts into practice the ideas and inspirations caused by the international and art films seen in his London Film Society years. We see visual and narrative references (ideas and themes) of German Expressionism: the vulnerability of human life, death, ruthlessness. I think Hitchcock knew the concepts he wanted to flirt with, the approach he would late develop within his films are taken from German Expressionism and the way he could tell the story with Russian Montage theories. His films are a combination of these instinctive film practices and his definition of what cinema can be by merely relying on visuals.

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Hello, again. My thoughts...

 

1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden — what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? Similarities: 1) Focus on a women — as a victim and also as a heroine (woman identified the killer). 2) Large cast of characters — most are just in the background. 3) Sense of being part of everyday life. 4) Focus on/use of modern technologies — the radio and headphones in The Pleasure Garden; the communications/publication machinery (also, I love the dash cam!) in The Lodger. 5) Everyday life scenarios.  Differences: 1) First scene takes place outside on a dodgy street in the misty dark in The Lodger; first scene takes place in a confined, comfortable indoor space in The Pleasure Garden. 2) The setting in The Lodger is dark and foreboding. The setting in The Pleasure Garden is generally bright, lively and cheerful. 3) Setting/tone of The Lodger is not lofty (no one is putting on airs). The tone of The Pleasure Garden is frivolous, carefree, jovial — presumably like the upper class. 4) The crowd of observers seems to want to be left unknown in The Lodger; the crowd of observers and dancers in The Pleasure Garden want to be seen and known.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? Well… I covered some of this in my response to #1 above… but… the emotional close-ups of people’s faces is one of the things I like about Hitchcock films.

 

The newspaper delivery car weaving through the crowds and traffic on the street — as seen via the dash cam! — creates a sense of urgency. In fact, the dash cam turns the car into a character, not just a utilitarian object that takes you from one place to another being driven by a human. It is heading down the street on a serious course with a purpose. Consider the airplane in North by Northwest attempting to take down Cary Grant. Granted, in NxNW, we don’t see the view from the aircraft’s perspective, but it is still an object of transportation being used as a means to an end. And it (the airplane) feels menacing in and of itself (we don’t see the pilot so we don’t necessarily connect a human element as the driver).

 

The “powerful storytelling” is shown in Hitchcock’s knack for connecting real life with the story. It’s not just people in a room acting smart around each other saying all the right things. Delivering the lines. Dressing right for the part. Mimicking realistic movements. Showing off. Instead, it’s people unconcerned with how they look because one moment they were going about their lives business as usual and the next, there’s a murder and they are freaked out about it and dealing with it the best way they can based on their life experiences (which... we don't even know about). And, of course, the media wants not only to spread the word about the murder, but to get the scoop. It’s a realistic look into “a day in the life of…”

 

As for a sense of emotion… the woman screaming at the very start provides the viewer with the understanding that you are just beginning on a journey of fear, and it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? The background music, of course, assists the viewer in feeling the “right” emotion for the scream. The shot works because, in this case, we are not there. The woman who is screaming is not looking at us. She is not connecting with us through her eyes (line of sight) or voice (the scream). She is, presumably, either looking at her killer’s face, or looking off into the distance for help she isn't going to get. This puts us at a distance from her and the scene which, in turn, creates tension because — we would help her if we could, right? Only, by not acknowledging us with her eye contact, she is telling us that we can’t. And we probably wouldn’t have heard her scream at the time of her murder anyway, even if we’d been in town when it happened. She is suffering in silence, whether or not she is heard; whether or not we are there.

 

Also, it’s possible she’s not even screaming out loud at all! She may be too terrified to make a sound. Which, of course, is terrifying to us, too. And it doesn't require a motion picture with sound.

 

Of course, the first other scream that comes to mind is the one in the shower in Psycho. In that case, we feel a bit more present in the scene, and also uncomfortable because we all know what it’s like to be vulnerable in the shower… and have that fear of pulling back the curtain and someone being there to attack. (We do all have that fear, right...?). Usually for me, it’s my cat who magically appears on the side of the tub at shower time. But… if it ever wasn’t her… I’d totally be screaming.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The Lodger feels more frenzied, with quick cuts.  

 

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

​What struck me immediately was the use of the masculine shadow on the wall followed immediately by the woman screaming. It reminded me of Frenzy.

 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

The terrified facial expression sells the scream, even without sound. Also, see above. 

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 1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

The opening scenes were similar in that Hitch wasted no time getting right to the action. "The Pleasure Garden" was more of an upbeat introduction while "The Lodger" really displayed the mystery/darkness/crime that makes up the Hitchcock touch. 

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

There is a lot of focus on what Hitchcock would want you to pick up on. There is a long hold on the screaming women and then later on the typewriter describing the attacker. 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

The camera angle is POV in nature and as such, the woman is looking right into the camera. It's definitely more effective than another shot that isn't as engaging. It's very similar to Janet Leigh in "Psycho" during the shower scene. Other close shots in Hitchcock movies include the screaming woman/jewel thief victim at the beginning of "To Catch a Thief" and even Tippi Hedrin in "The Birds".

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

I noticed a huge difference in the manner of presentation. The Pleasure Garden was not so fast paced as The Lodger. The Lodger was very dark and quick. The Pleasure Garden was more slow paced, and unfolding on its own time. I liked both methods.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

 

There is always the newspaper boy, and the crowd of people following the headlines, scared out of their minds. The commotion and fear that the story line incurs is priceless. There is that powerful sense of media sensationalism at work.

 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

I immediately thought of The Pleasure Garden and Psycho. By filming just the head and the open mouth screaming, you get the idea that a scream is being released. Its so simple and effective. I love it.

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The silent scream at the beginning of The Lodger evokes in retrospect Hitchcock's more famous silent scream in Psycho. The tight close-up of the woman's face, but no voice is heard, just the high shrill violins of the score (although, admittedly, the music we hear for The Lodger may not have been the actual music that accompanied that particular film). The audio stand-in of the violins is obviously one factor of what makes the shot "work" without sound. Primarily, however, it's that everyone is familiar with what a woman looks like when she is screaming, and our brain fills in the rest. The sound of her actual voice doing the screaming isn't necessary to evoke the emotion and panic; the expression on her face, which is put center-stage because of the tight framing, does the job for us.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

I think these openings didn't have a lot of similarities. Perhaps the black and white opening but that's about it. I suppose you could point out that we open with a female/females in both opening sequences. I don't think I can compare the staircase in The Pleasure Garden to the screaming female in The Lodger, but one could try to connect that in an obscure fashion but it's a bit of a stretch.

The major differences to me that are immediate are the tones. The Pleasure Garden opens with a happy tone, dancing and fun. The Lodger opens with horror and a sense of dread and violence.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

In this sequence there are a lot of "Hitchcock style" elements. The first that stuck out to me is something that actually surprised me at this early in his career. The usage of color in a black and white silent film. Hitch is a master at using visuals to be specific with the audience. We see a bluish filter that adds to the dread and horror of the killing. It also adds to the tension and distraught feelings the onlookers were having. Then we cut to the newspaper and the camera is in sepia tone. This affect really paid dividends in breaking up the locations and a great way to cut away to get into the viewers minds.

Then we have the screaming victim. The blaming of an innocent bystander when a lady saw his distorted reflection.

We have the dead body covered in white and can see some blood, but we never see a violent gore filled attack scene (although we saw one in Psycho, but never saw the blade enter the victim).

There's also the music which always plays a huge part in demonstrating emotion during a scene. We also see that the victim of The Avenger was a "fair haired girl".

Finally we get the Hitchcock cameo (albeit with a little more hair) at the desk in the news office.  

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

 

Hitchcock frames the mouth very closely but we also see the terror in the screaming lady's eyes. It's also at a slight angle, which is a very powerful visual. Instead of the audible scream we get the nice musical score that easily convey's the horror of the scream.

The scream scene that first comes to mind of course is the Psycho shower scene. Another is the basement scene in Psycho when Mother's body is found. Also the killer's falling-from-window scene at the end of Rear Window comes to mind.

*Additional thoughts:

The "typewriter scene" made me think of David Lynch a bit. Notably the length to which we are shown the singular shot of the typewriter passing along the words to the audience. Lynch often focuses on one scene for an extended amount of time which acts like an aesthetic. Perhaps an influence on Lynch in this area. For Hitch, I think he utilized the scene rather well by relaying a message to the audience without using movie title cards. 

 

My favorite quote from today's Hitch interview:
 
“I'm a believer that films belong to the masses. It was the newest art of the 20th century. There's always that feeling that ‘commercial’ or ‘box office’ are dirty words. And it's nothing to do with it. It's to do with telling a story with the widest possible appeal but still applying all the artistic techniques and manner of storytelling without degrading yourself at all to what is vulgarly called the commercial. I think it's axiomatic that if you take into consideration the elements that interest wide audiences then you can tell your story as imaginatively as you'd like, as long as you make it clear to them.” – Alfred Hitchcock
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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 
 
Well, there's for sure a lot of energy present in both opening scenes -- no slow build or anything. The viewer gets drawn right into key events that are already in progress. It reminds me of how things happen in real life. You're just going about your business. Then you turn a corner, wander into a shop, or come across a bunch of people gathered together and stop for a while to see what's going on. (I suppose that's part of what makes me feel like a voyeur or a "looky-loo" when I watch a Hitchcock film, these included.)
 
The biggest difference for me has to do with the mood. It's obviously very playful in The Pleasure Garden. We're there to check out some dancers, have a good time, and maybe enjoy a laugh. I feel part of the action in that I want to be there and share in everyone else's fun night. With The Lodger, it's tense and frightening. I feel just as engaged, but it's because I don't want to be there. I do, on the other hand, want to find out what happened so that I can avoid winding up like Golden Curls. In that way, I feel like part of the problem -- that crowd that will probably wind up spreading and believing "fake news" because they're just that desperate to know and pass it on.
 
2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 
 
The extreme close-ups stuck out the most for me. It puts me into the shoes of characters that are already part of the scene (whether they're seen or unseen) and makes me feel involved sooner and to a greater degree, I think. It's both exciting and unsettling at the same time. For instance, I'm not terribly enthused as a person at the idea of looking into the face of a woman I'm probably about to kill and "hearing" her scream (or picturing that happening to her, if that's what's indeed going on instead), but I'm forced to experience the energy and emotion that would come along with doing that anyway.
 
There is something quite interesting about that -- putting the viewer straight into the shoes of voyeuristic characters doing questionable things and encouraging identification -- that Hitch does very well. The same thing goes for being part of a crowd discussing something as upsetting as murder and listening to firsthand accounts from someone that allegedly saw it happen.
 
3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 
 
It's that dang close-up. Like I said in my answer to the second question, it makes you feel like you're literally right there. You pick up on all the nuances of the woman's face and get the full impact of that emotion she's expressing when you're that close. You can't help it. It happens whether you're comfortable with it or not and it's quite powerful.
 
The music does an excellent job of emphasizing what's going on as well. The instruments sound frantic and frenzied -- very much like a scream. It's like with the stabbing shower scene in Psycho. The scene is so well cut, well scored, and artfully done overall, that you don't quite notice you never once see a blade sink into any flesh. You're certainly left feeling as if you did though! Hitchcock does a great job of implying things without having to spell them right out for the viewer. He makes some seriously smart suggestions and lets your imagination fill in the blanks.
 
As far as other screams that are similar? I think of Marion Crane getting stabbed to death in the shower in Psycho. (I'm struggling to totally remember, but I don't think you hear her screaming.) Also Melanie Daniels getting pecked at by seagulls in The Birds. I don't think we actually hear her screaming either. Honestly though, I guess I've never considered whether or not I've actually heard some of the iconic Hitchcock screams I'm thinking of with my actual ears. I always assumed I had, but now I'm not as sure. 

 

Good point about the close ups on the screaming girl and his early work compared to Marion Crane too. I forgot about Melanie in The Birds too. Then there's  'Scottie' Ferguson and the close up with hair flying and bizarre coloring. What a frantic scene! All great Hitch'ings.

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The similarities between The Pleasure Garden and the Lodger are the main focus is of a blonde woman, crowds of people gathered to watch the action, reactions of the crowd to what they are witnessing and at the end of the clip it appears that there is a group of men with one woman in the crowd. Just as there was one woman in the audience with the men who were watching the dancers. Also there was a bit of humor such as when the dancer hands her admirer the curl from her wig (The Pleasure Garden) and when the man covers his face to imitate the women's description of the killer(The Lodger). 

 

The differences between The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger are that the crowd gathered at the club are happy and are there to be entertained but the crowds gathered in The Lodger are there to find out about the victim and they are fearful. 

 

The "Hitchcock Style" in The Lodger can be seen with the close up of the woman screaming (Psycho, The Birds). A blonde as main focus in the scene emphasized by the name "Golden Curls" the press has given the victim. The fear of the town's citizens increasing as the story of the dead woman spreads (Frenzy). Also the truck that is delivering the newspapers has two round windows and as it drives down the street the viewer appears to be watching the scene through binoculars (Rear Window). 

 

Even though this is a silent film, the expression on the women's face as she is screaming conveys the fear and terror she is experiencing. No words are needed. The close up draws you in, so all you can focus on is her and her fear. You do not see what is happening so you have to imagine what is happening. That is the true "Hitchcock Style". The suspense is built up and because you don't always see what is happening your imagination can conjure up all kinds of horrors and anticipation of what is to come pulls you in deeper to the situation Hitchcock has created for the characters. Hitchcock puts the viewer on the edge of their seat and makes you squirm until the end of the ride. The not knowing can be scarier than if you could actually see it. In later films which do have sound Hitchcock was able to emphasize that fear even more because now you have the visual and the audible of the screams. But with the close up you still can only focus on the the one who is screaming and what is happening to make them scream. Such as in the shower scene in Psycho, when the birds are attacking Melanie Daniels in The Birds, or when the thunder and lightening strike during the storm in Marnie.

 

 

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I don't feel drawn to any particular character in The Lodger. The opening seems to be more about mood and tone; objects and sound more than specific human emotion. Even though it opens with a silent scream, the character screaming could be anyone and I feel removed from her. For me, the score and the juxtaposition of images communicate more in this opening than anything else. There is more mood than story here. I'm curious how that might have been accomplished without the edits.

 

I appreciate the different perspectives that Hitchcock forces and allows the audience to experience even in this short clip. As the audience tries to orient itself, it is likely uncertain about its role. And I would guess that was part of his design.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

The two clips had notable similarities and differences. While the two differ in lighting and music, The Pleasure Garden being indoors (mostly) with bright lighting & vibrant and jubilant music, while The Lodger is outdoors, in the dark of night with a more stress-inducing music, both show a mix of raucous actions (the girls running down the staircase and dancing on stage) in the 1st and the press (hurrying to post their story of the murdered woman; the reporter on the phone, the teletype beating out words, the press churning out papers, and news van rushing through the streets to deliver the story) in the 2nd. I feel Hitchcock loved to juxtapose chaos amidst the calm in scenes to heighten audience emotion and draw you into the story. You need to pay attention in his films as event can escalate quickly.

This worked well in North By Northwest, particularly in the scenes where Thornhill  first meets Mr. Caplan at the UN, only to have that calm meeting abruptly escalate into bedlam as Caplan is killed and Thornhill is singled out as the prime suspect now fleeing for his life. Also later, in the train station, where Thornhill dressed as a Redcap calmly walks out of the train with Eve Kendal, but later must again flee, while authorities ransack every Redcap in the place looking for Thornhill. Hitchcock is able to invoke emotional connection using both settings with equal result.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

One that comes to mind immediately is that the protagonist in these clips are blondes (The blonde dancer with curls in the Pleasure Garden or the fair-haired women, as the victim is described in The Lodger), certainly a Hitchcock  moniker; the blonde as a central female character.

Another trait is the use of narrative to show the crime, with the teletype hammering out the details of the grisly event rather than showing the actual  killing on screen. This point was used effectively in Shadow of a Doubt, where Uncle Charlie's crimes are read about in the paper by his brother-in-law, while the camera watches Charles for reaction.

Another is the chicanery of the background characters performing less then admirably, like the pickpocket in the Pleasure Garden lifting the letter of reference from the woman's purse or the man in the crowd mocking the witness by covering his face with his jacket in The Lodger. Both show that almost anyone can be evil in a Hitchcock film, even if to a smaller degree.

For heightened emotion, one can look to the frightened witness in The Lodger, her wide eyes and gestures emulate her terror of seeing the crime committed and trying to relay those events to the policeman and the crowd. Or the blonde dancehall gal glaring back at the men in the audience, who's faces show pulse racing excitement in watching the performance. These looks all induce an emotional response, that our master of suspense must want from his audience.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

Certainly the opening scream is reminiscent of Psycho's shower scene. Both in The Lodger and Psycho, the camera assumes the POV of the prey, looking down upon its victim, slightly atilt to add to the confusion and in both cases the music is substituted for an actual scream to add to the suspense of the moment. Certainly a requirement in a silent film, but effective in Psycho, too. This also worked well in Frenzy, when the hapless women of London are repeatedly attacked.

 

I must confess, I did not spot Hitch in The Lodger clip, but he would have been a much younger and thinner man who does not stand out so, as he would in his later movies.

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The Lodger was kinda chaotic as it starts out.The woman screaming, even silently gave full impact as her mouth and face are are contorting and her eyes widen. I felt her terror. After the police see the victim and interview the witness no one seems to care what happened to the poor girl lying there for all the world to see. Some standing in front of the drink stand where the police took the woman to calm her down I suppose, seem to make inappropriate comments (silently of course) and make jokes by trying to look like the killer. I guess they feel nervous. But I do think I spotted Hitch. He was sitting with his back to the camera in front of a multi-paned window talking on the phone at the newspaper. I can see the presses on the other side of the window. It was your 6 sec hint that clued me in. 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


Well, the Lodger is definitely darker in style - the music and the woman screaming are two key differences.  The Pleasure Garden is definitely not as openly dark, despite the leering men and the suggestive content.


They are both very active and hectic, like life in a city tends to be.


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


Elements that are Hitcockian are the fast focusing on the different groups that are affected by the events that take place.  As in Rear Window, where you get a glimpse of each apartment and the tenants that rush to the window to see what is happening, you see the different groups of people in town reporting the news, physically printing the news and those hearing first hand and those buying the papers - all to see the details of the crime that has occurred.  It is human nature at it's finest.


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


Well, he lengthens out the scream so that we see/hear the horror.  It is like the scream in the shower scene of Psycho.  One that you cannot remove from your memory!  Her face fills the entire screen.  Or in the Man Who Knew Too Much, her scream when the man is about to shoot - you see Doris's face in the shot as a close up.  


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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? Both openings start fast and draw you into the story.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? The fact that there are so few title or speaking cards allows the story to flow and this world to develop. Instead of a speaking card he uses the teletype to keep movement to flow. The use of blue tinted film to not only show that it is night but a dark and dangerous world. Along with the use of fuzzy shots of the crowd.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? The opening scream is reminiscent of the opening shot of Rope. It sets the tone for the film and gets the audience on edge

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1. The movement and specificity are similar, but THE LODGER is much darker where THE PLEASURE GARDEN opens with such gaiety and decadence. 

2. The "Hitchcock style" is evident in the concise focus on actions and the American scale of the shots, but what stands out most for me is the rhythm, the duration of shots and especially the timing of the cutting from the flashing light signs to the individual figures to the crowd scenes. It's really orchestrated at a specific rate.     

3. The opening image of the woman screaming, with her face at a diagonal and the halo of curls around her pale face, is immediately alarming - the angle is unnerving and the rhythm of her quavering open mouth against her glowing hair weaves around the rhythm of the music to create multi-media cacophony. The first Hitchcock scream that always comes to mind for me is the PSYCHO shower scene...

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

Similarities: Typical crowded and fast-moving scenes.  Differences:  No humor in this one!

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence. Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? 

 

The first is the close-up of the woman screaming.  Second, the flashing sign "TO-NIGHT, GOLDEN CURLS", which, ironically, portends Hitch's fondness for blond-haired women in his movies. 

 

Or images that provide an excess of emotion?  

 

The woman screaming, the frantic reporters trying to get the news phoned in, the teletype machine, the newspaper presses, the car speeding through the streets to deliver the papers all give a sense of urgency and mayhem.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

The shot is framed from  slightly upward-looking-down slant.  This gives the impression that she is looking at her murderer as she is being killed.  The length of the shot and the wide-open mouth of the woman conveys the "in-audible" scream.  The most obvious analogy in later years is the shower scene in "Psycho".

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden; The similarities & differences between the two films.

 

The obvious difference between these two films is about the tonality.

The Lodger is very well related with Hitchcock's later works that provide us with dramatic & intense feeling. While Pleasure Garden gives happy & lighter tonality.

 

I noticed some similarities between the two films.

One of them is the using of close up shot to open the films. It contains intimacy & how it takes the audience to get into the story.

 

There are also some Point of View (POV) shots in extreme close up to reveal the details that are needed to understand the story.

 

In Pleasure Garden, it shows in binocular's sequence. The camera is getting blurred as the man is having difficulty seeing the dancer clearly. Also the extreme close up of the lady's purse as the man's POV when he's taking the money from the purse.

In The Lodger, it's just like what appears in the extreme close up shot of "The Avenger", 

 

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock Style" in this sequence.

 

- The very beginning of the sequence shows the silhouette of a man as it is also shown in most of Hitchcock's later works.

 

- The Close Up shot of the screaming woman that is very intense and powerful. Hitchcock always opens the story with the problem in a very dramatic output. It then makes the audience want to stay because they want to find out more.

 

- The breakdown of the shots. Hitchcock cuts different shots of different actions into pieces. The take out is very sharp and it's easily getting into audience's mind.

 

- The music.

 

3. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames the woman screaming shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard.

 

The music is taking important part in conveying the message of the story and helping to create dramatic impact.

 

From the visual, it's because of the execution of the shot by using high angle camera and very close up shot focusing on the talent's face. The gesture of the screaming woman is also on point and very sharp in telling the story.

 

The shot at least reminds me of Psycho and The Birds.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

 

Lots of activity, close-ups of people in the theatre/people in the street.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

 

The crowd's reaction to the witness.  Although she's probably saying a lot, since we don't hear her, the crowd's reaction to her wild-eyed emotional reaction helps to let us know what's going on.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

I know a lot of people might think of Janet Leigh's silent scream in "Psycho," but the first thing I thought of was Tippi Hedren and Jessica Tandy's silent screams in "The Birds." 

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1. The similarities between the Lodger and the Pleasure Garden is that the characters in both film are both blond hair women. They are displayed as victims to men and society. The girl in Pleasure Garden is a victim to man's lustful and evil nature, while the girl in the Lodger is a murder's victim (physical victim)

 

However, the tone of the both films are different. In the Pleasure Garden, the tone is more joyful due to the music being used and the depiction of enjoyment of men through the dancing of women. In the Lodger, the tone is more suspenseful and disturbing, as we start off with the scene of a girl screaming in terror, causing fear to the audiences. The locations is also different as the Pleasure Garden starts off indoors, while the Lodger is mostly at outdoors.

 

2. The opening scene is a powerful way of storytelling as it starts off with an mysterious girl screaming in terror and fear, making the audiences scared and also mark  the beginning of a bumpy, unpredictable story as it starts off with a scene of fear with no information of what's going on. Hitchcock use his visuals and artistic skills to tell the story and set the tone of unpredictability and fear of the story. Another thing that can be seen in the story is the fast paced cutting, which intensifies and cause more suspense in the story as it indicates the tone of fear to the audience, depicting fear and showing chaos about the girl being murdered in the story.

 

3. The screaming scene is a close- up shot, showing and intensifying the fearfulness in the girl's eyes as she is close to getting murdered. The scene and the scream close up shot is similar to the shot in Psycho; a mysterious, terrifying scream that will haunt the audience throughout the movie.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


These are two completely different style of films but I did see some similarities.


1.) The opening gets you right away. The girls coming down the staircase in The Pleasure Garden and the victim screaming at the beginning of The Lodger.


2.) The other similarities are the obvious in that they are both silent films, both black and white (even though the restored version of The Lodger shown here is in Monochrome) and have a love story.


3.) The use of blonde hair being attractive to men is shown in both movies. Women using blonde wigs. 


Differences


1.) Pleasure Garden is more of a drama with some comedic elements but not suspenseful or horrific. The Lodger is suspenseful and horrific. 


 


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


The use of of "To-night Golden Curls". It has a double meaning as you first see it as a headline to the woman killed but then it can also be seen as the marquee for the modeling show as a lot of the women wore blonde wigs. This also seems to be a Hitchcock theme as Hitch himself loved blonde hair on women and cast a lot of his major female characters with blonde hair ( Tippi Hedren, Kim Novak, Grace Kelly and Janet Leigh to name a few). 


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


The closeup of the woman is very important. It sets the tone of the film. It shocks you from the beginning. You don't need to hear it by looking at the look of terror on her face. 


This is revisited in many of Hitchcock's films including Janet Leigh in Psycho and Tippi Hedren in The Birds. 


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1). Both opening scenes have an abrupt escalation in the action, albeit they go in two different directions, PG brings you up and introduces you to a chorus line of beautiful girls, it's fun and exciting, but TL brings you down, you feel the woman's terror and the fear and excitement of the people who just witnessed a horrific, public crime. The shots accomplish the same thing, putting you on the edge of your seat (one can only imagine the racing emotions of the original viewers of this burgeoning medium...what will happen next), but with different emotions.

 

2). The newspaper headline montage of course, but the scene that caught my attention was towards the end of the clip, as the newspaper is going out, we go along for the ride, pov style, through the streets in the back of the truck.

 

Also, when the detective reveals the Avenger note pinned to the inside of her coat, it's meant for us, the audience, to see. It's not just a note, it's the way it's revealed and I suppose it's size, that makes it feel like we checked the inside of her coat.

 

3). I think framing it so we only see her head, makes us focus on her more intently, and her expressions help us feel the terror she must be feeling, even without sound, we know she's suffering. Size matters, zooming in makes us feel like we're there, sharing the moment, which serves to draw us in, to care about her, and possibly feel it for ourselves, the helplessness at least anyway.

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So I decided to watch The Lodger in its entirety this evening because I have never seen it and I am rather ashamed to admit that it was my very first silent film!

 

After watching the film, I honestly feel like the opening scene is probably the least compelling part of the movie for me. In terms of comparing it to The Pleasure Garden, both scenes had rather a lot happening in a brief period of time but they seemed very different to me other than that. I was hard pressed to come up with "Hitchcock Style" examples as well, but the rest of the film was full of them! I actually found myself thinking "Of course this is a Hitchcock film!". Here are some things that struck me (don't worry, no real "spoilers" here if you haven't gotten a chance to watch yet or are waiting for the airing next week on TCM):

  • Use of light and shadow
  • Creative film techniques (the visual of Daisy, Joe and Daisy's mother imagining The Lodger pacing back and forth, Joe having his realization about who he thinks the Avenger might be while staring at the footprint in the mud...)
  • Romantic subplot (Probably a good example of what Dr Edwards was talking about in today's video when he commented about how Hitch was successful in pleasing himself artistically but still maintaining a sense of commercial accessibility. People love a good romance!)
  • Compelling and legitimately suspenseful plot. The plot was not perfect by any means but there were definitely a couple moments where I was on the edge of my seat. I never thought this would be possible from a silent film.

The scream of course brings to mind Janet Leigh's "scream" in Psycho. We don't really need the sound for these screams and in a way perhaps the lack of sound makes it more powerful in a way? We have heard a million women scream in movies, we know what it sounds like. Although I suppose someone having watched in this a theatre in 1927 would never have heard a women scream in a film before, so the scream may have felt like something else entirely to them!

 

Incidentally, I watched a really lovely print of this film on the internet which was accompanied by a score performed by the London Symphony Orchestra (I found this out by using the "Shazam" app). I may record it on TCM as well though because I am really curious to see what version they play. 

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Comparing openings of The Lodger and Pleasure Garden - the use of camera angles and lighting struck me as similar. In Pleasure Garden, the girls are illuminated while it's black around them. The closeup of a woman screaming and subsequent scenes are meant to disturb the viewer. 

 

Hitchcock Style in Pleasure Garden open shows the men viewing the women on stage from their perspective. Also the purse being illuminated tells the story like he likes to do.

The Lodger has to be the opening screaming woman. That grabs you and makes you uncomfortable which he also excelled at.

 

The famous Hitchcock closeup of screams? Like everyone has said, Psycho and the Birds!

 

I watched Pleasure Garden tonight online and didn't really see much Hitchcock yet. Using Cuddles the dog to foreshadow the horrible things to come with that man and then the humorous chewing of cables at the end - is that a Hitchcock ploy? I'm not sure!

 

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