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I was struck by how the opening clip looks at the transfer of information in a very succinct way. The eyewitness explains what she saw to the police, the reporter writes this information down, then calls in the story to his paper, where it is sent over the teletype, then moves to the printing press.  The bundled papers are then delivered to the men selling papers, and the information about the murder is circulated among the throngs who purchase the paper, and the story headlines are posted on paper signs and on the running lighted banner. And all through the sequence people are seen talking to one another as the news of the crime becomes known. This all reminds me a bit of the "telephone" game most of us played at some point or another, where some bit of information is given to the first person, who re-tells the information to the next person, who re-tells it to the next, and so on. The last person who gets the information invariable has learned some news quite different from the message given to the first person. Since the drama in The Lodger centers around an innocent man suspected of the murder, Hitchcock's opening sequence is apt because it sets up the idea that what seems to be a truth may not be true at all as suspicions may be unfounded and details may be misconstrued.

 

The scream that opens the film works without sound because the overhead angle from which the subject is shot, as well as the terror visible in her eyes, and the warbling of her mouth create a disturbing sense of immediacy. The tight close up shows no background in which to place the character so that the expression of terror is all that we see. The scream is reminiscent of that in Psycho, but another student's post mentioned the opening of Rope, which I had forgotten. That's a good connection, because it opens the film right in the middle of the action, then the rest of the film is about what motivated the murder and the process of exposing the criminals.

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In comparing The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger, we witness Hitchcock's artistic birth as a filmmaker. He was clearly crafting his first works in a signature manner, all the while discovering his own artistry as he created. The Lodger is a departure from the context of The Pleasure Garden, as it deals directly with the Hitchcock theme(s) of suspense coupled with murder. The Lodger has been crafted directly around the grotesque (death and darkness.) The hues of the film depict an unsettling atmosphere, reminiscent of lurking danger, possibly the killer himself, around every corner. The characters within The Lodger are frightened to the extent of nearly fainting while The Pleasure Garden aims to incite an upbeat feeling. It's a battle of the facial expressions, The Pleasure Garden (light-hearted smiles) vs The Lodger (contorted fear.)

 

Three images searing in their nature signify Hitchcock's bind with German Expressionism. They include; the shadowy figure opening the scene, the contorted frightened face of a woman, and a distorted blur of a man’s imitation of the killer (we see his reflection for a few seconds.) These images are exaggerated to the effect displaying innermost feelings of fear and unease. Another prime example of German Expressionism is the use of the Dutch angle. Hitchcock framed the face of the very frightened woman to a slanted degree. This type of framework is indicative of a feeling of unease/terror. He also employed his stylistic approach of cutting to and from (the dead girl and frightened woman speaking with police.) This type of editing builds suspense and anticipation easily linking the two characters together.

 

Hitchcock cleverly used a tight, close up shot to set the tone of the film, which grabs ahold of the audience straight away. The frightened woman's face fills the entire frame, her eyes wide, mouth agape, with an elimination of any sound. She's is in a state of shock, nearly frozen in fear. The lack of sound heightens the effect of the woman's muted scream. Screaming with an absence of sound is terrifying in and of itself due to a lack of vocal expression. The voice is a very powerful aspect of any animal, and being stripped of that method of communication especially in a state of unrest and in dire need of assistance magnifies the horror to a very great extent.

 

The opening of The Lodger being situated directly on a terrified woman provided a reminder of one of Hitchcock’s masterpieces, Psycho. One cannot forget the very famous shower scene and the look of sheer terror having overtaken Marion Crane’s (Janet Leigh) face. The Lodger was a definite precursor to Psycho in exhibiting a frightened​ face filling a frame. Hitchcock was readily and confidently building his artistry within The Lodger, and the future became his, as a filmmaker, to own.

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Some common Hitchcockian elements are here already: the young blond Victims, the montages and quick cuts for suspense. Comparing it to Pleasure Garden specifically, it's interesting to see Hitchcock's fascination with people's reactions to a created persona or phenomenon. It's an aspect of his common theme of voyeurism. In the Pleasure Garden intro, we watch the men watching the chorus girls projecting their persona of dancing legs and curls of hair. In The Lodger intro, we watch the city watching the spectacle of the murder scene investigation. They watch ans react with as much frenzy in their panic as the old men had in their lust over the show girls. And just as the old man in the front row steadily built up the persona of the blond chorus girl in his mind, gazing in a passion, rising from his chair and requesting to speak with her until he could scarcely breath when alone with her, the city people in The Lodger build the terror of the Avenger by spreading the news. They act it out, they call it in, they run it through the machinery of their public consciousness (we see this literally with the printing press images) until they are just as fevered over the object of their terror as the old man was over the object of his desire. 

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

Similarities:  In both films, the opening shows that a woman is duped (in The Pleasure Garden, Jill has something stolen from her purse; in The Lodger, the eye witness believes she sees 'The Avenger' in the reflection of the refreshment stand (?) but it is someone playing a trick).

The opening of the two films are both concerned with the theme of exposure and vulnerability.

Differences: whereas The Pleasure Garden focuses on particular characters (e.g. Mr Hamilton, Patsy and Jill) from the outset, The Lodger is exposing a process (i.e. the transfer of information from the local to the global). The Pleasure Garden seemed to be exposing the 'male gaze' in a specific context, in that the young fair headed lady is part of a theatrical chorus line, but The Lodger takes the young fair headed lady as part of a grander narrative; the exposure is on a much larger scale.

The Pleasure Garden deals with questions about morality within relationships (the interaction between the admirer and Patsy, for example) but The Lodger is examining questions about morality in the public sphere (the public reaction to a crime)

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

- Shadow, mirror images, reflections - these all suggest duplicity and suspense 

- The importance of facial expression (contrast - news that The Avenger covers the face)

- the technique of 'watching' as a process, Hitchcock leads the viewer to certain scenes/scenarios by way of a journey of images 

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

-The woman screaming fixes her eyes upward, which makes it seem like we are looking down at her, placing the viewer in the perspective of the perpetrator, which is more alarming than watching face-on.

-The lighting that is used adds to the dramatic nature of the scene, because of the brightness of the background. This also happens in Psycho, with the scream juxtaposed against the bright white tiles of the background.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films?

 

The main similarity is the story's reliance on the reactions of other people to communicate the tone. The main difference is that the one communicated in this film doesn't have the sense of humor previously present in The Pleasure Garden, but is instead replaced with a dismal tone.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion?

 

Alfred Hitchcock's use of title cards stood out as unique, perhaps because of his earlier work designing them. They gave me a sense of the film being ahead of its time. The film's focus on the citizens surrounding the situation could be compared to Alfred Hitchcock's later films including North By Northwest or To Catch A Thief, where Cary Grant portrays characters that are caught up in different scenarios and have to navigate their way through the general public on multiple occasions. Another aspect I noticed elements of was the influence of German expressionism. This was present in the use of different colored filters on the film, along with the focus on technology driving humanity; which in this case is communicated through imagery such as the mechanics of the newspaper press and the scrolling banner.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

 

A close-up camera shot was used, along with the subject's line of sight being angled away from the camera, indicating that there is something beyond the camera causing fear. This is an effective way to create fear for the viewer, because it allows them to imagine the source of the danger since they cannot see it. As a result, it has already set up the tone and the scream can be "heard" even more naturally. Additionally, the score during this scene reminds me of the musical stabs used at the moment the scream in Psycho occurs.

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I was struck by how the opening clip looks at the transfer of information in a very succinct way. The eyewitness explains what she saw to the police, the reporter writes this information down, then calls in the story to his paper, where it is sent over the teletype, then moves to the printing press.  The bundled papers are then delivered to the men selling papers, and the information about the murder is circulated among the throngs who purchase the paper, and the story headlines are posted on paper signs and on the running lighted banner. And all through the sequence people are seen talking to one another as the news of the crime becomes known. This all reminds me a bit of the "telephone" game most of us played at some point or another, where some bit of information is given to the first person, who re-tells the information to the next person, who re-tells it to the next, and so on. The last person who gets the information invariable has learned some news quite different from the message given to the first person.

 

I wonder if part of the reason for the montage you describe isn't also to set the real premise of the film, which is the way the crime of the Avenger isn't just the murder of the 7 victims but also the degree to which the city is being held in an elevated grip of fear. Without this being obvious, the chain of events that follow, where an unknown man becomes the screen upon which the boarding house projects its paranoia, doesn't seem as believable.

 

This, if done today, would almost certainly be linked to the obsession that Western Civilization, particularly the US has with living in fear -- that is based in something true, but has exploded into something much larger, more dangerous, and considerably less honest.

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Another prime example of German Expressionism is the use of the Dutch angle.

 

It is interesting to note that the 'Dutch' angle is actually German in origin, the word being a bastardization of 'Deutsch'. At any rate, this was certainly something Hitchcock would have been exposed to in Germany.

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The Lodger has all the recognizable ingredients of a classic Hitchcock film. To me, the similarities between the two films are the chaotic nature of life in the city and the innocent being preyed upon.

The scene where the text/action is being provided by a typewriter is clever. I don't remember noticing that technique in any other silent film (but I could be completely mistaken). I also like how, even though a woman has been murder, life continues (vendors selling coffee, and of course, newspaper reporters rushing about to break the story).

Using an extreme close-up of the woman screaming makes no mistake of her actions. it's impossible to not know what she is doing (actually, to me, I prefer a silent scream...less annoying)!!

Because of the close-up camera angle, the first thoughts connect that scene with Janet Leigh's character from Pyscho. I can't recall the movie, but I believe Hitchcock has also used a train whistle to correspond with a loud scream (as if drowning out the sound of the scream).

In summary, I can understand why this movie is considered Hitchcock's first classic and how he utilized German film techniques to capture the mood.

I can't wait to revisit this film on Wednesday.

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One thing I noticed in this clip that I thought demonstrates Hitchcock style is the way he holds onto a scene of terror almost like a freeze frame. The girl screaming in this clip was very similar to "Psycho" - it's a scene of a womsn doing a prolonged scream. Another instance where Hitchcock uses a prolonged close up of terror is in "North by Northwest" where Hitchcock shows a close-up of hands when Cary Grant trying to pull up Eva Marie Saint. This use close ups and ability to know just how long to hold on to them seems like a Hitchcock trademark to me.

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Q1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

A: Both films start with interesting or intriguing visuals that grab your attention immediately. Both openings feature women (a group of women performers in The Pleasure Garden and one woman in close-up in The Lodger).

Q: 2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

A: The focus on the woman's face, emotions are similar to those in Psycho. Both are murders, but Hitchcock used close ups to help the audience get into a character's head to get you emotionally involved with the characters. For example, the close up of Ingrid Bergman in Notorious when she realizes her husband and mother-in-law know she's a spy and that they're poisoning her.

Q3: 3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?

A: Hitchcock shoots the actress's face at an angle which adds to the terror. The extreme close-up makes you feel that the killer is on top of her and there is no escape. The obvious comparison is to Psycho. Janet Leigh's character has no where to go; she's trapped in the shower making it easy for the killer. The extreme close-up of Leigh is similar to the one in opening of The Lodger. Leigh's scream would be just as terrifying with no dialogue or sound because of Hitchcock's framing of the scene and the amazing editing and cutting.

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The woman's face, with her terrified eyes and screaming mouth, show a look of genuine horror. It is effective to begin with this image, as it evokes an emotion of terror that stays with you throughout the clip. Coupled with the dim lighting, frantic movement of everyone, and dramatic music, I'm on the edge of my seat the entire time! The image of the flashing MUR-DER also seems very Hitchcock-like. The mood of this clip, and likely the whole film, is definitely one of an anxious society.

 

I did not spot the Hitch cameo appearance, will have to keep looking.

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I hope this is the right discussion thread for this comment. The video interview segment with Hitchcock that went with the lecture and Daily Dose #2 was interesting to me because Hitchcock talked about art versus commercialism. He maintained that film is an art form meant for the masses, for everyone to view, and if one could find a good story to tell and tell it clearly to everyone, he or she could use any technique to get that story across -- as long as it was clear to everyone. Maybe that's part of his appeal: He didn't seem to think elitism had any place in film.

 

Did anyone else watch the video interview and come away with the same impression?

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In The Lodger, Hitchcock sets the mood and builds tension with the very first shots. His use of montage with the screaming woman, the murder victim, focuses on the crime that was committed. He used a titled angle shot for the screaming woman to enhance the tension more. He continues with the news of the crime being spread by the witness, police, and reporters. The word MUR-DER with the highlighted syllables builds the tension that Hitchcock wants to portray that is felt in the community. I can image hearing the word MURDER being shouted with the highlights of each syllable. Each shot is short and busy, which builds anxiety and excitement of the horror within the characters. 

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In The Pleasure Garden the men are trying to communicate with the dancers, the dancers with the audience, and the audience hopefully with friends to bring them in to see the show and start the cycle all over.  And in The Lodger the woman is communicating to the crowd, and so on down to the police, the reporters, and through the newspaper back to the crowd of citizens and to the woman. who'll look to see herself in the headlined story.  Both are communicating a lurid situation, though you see other characters in their own worlds - the sleeping female in the audience, the robbers, the dancers and newspaper employees earning a living, the people eating at the lunch counter (Is Hitchcock the man serving the food at the counter?). There is lots of movement of the people in both films - the stairs scene, the dancers, the aroused male audience, the agitated crowd, the police taking the incident report, the men printing, bundling, and delivering the papers as they do every day. 

 

I see Hitchcock's style in the intimate relationship of the actors to the audience - again you feel as if you're in the crowd.  His prime characters seem to push through the screen in an almost 3-D effect.  The frenetic pace of the crowd, the busy lunch counter, the movement of the teletype machine and the newspaper printing presses, the men moving the papers to delivery, all this increases the anxiety and fear factor.  Again, I find the eyes of the characters to be central to conveying the scene.  The 'murderer' the woman sees in the crowd reminds me of the way we see Norman Bates in his final scene - face tilted down and looking straight at you.  And the eyes are replicated by the two windows in the back of the delivery car, with the silhouettes of the two passengers serving as eyes darting back and forth.  This adds to the frenzy.

 

When I saw the terror in the woman's face and her mouth opened in a scream with teeth bared, my eyes opened wide and I inhaled quickly as if I had just heard an unexpected shriek outside my house.  Hitchcock put her right in your face to make you react.

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1)      One similarity that I saw between the two openings was that they both contain close – up shots of women’s faces; the screaming lady in the Lodger and the lady in the binoculars in the Pleasure Garden. Several differences that I saw with the Lodger include the lack of intertitles, more visual stimuli, and the repetition of the “tonight Golden Curl” and “Murder” titles. All of these gave more emotional depth to it, because you perceive confusion, urgency, surprise, and fear.

 

2)      The only elements I would think as “Hitchcock-ian” would be the close – up shots and the corresponding reactions that followed.

 

3)      The way that Hitchcock shows the murder and then the girl screaming is the only way that this would work in a silent picture, due to the association of the figure, the girl screaming, and then seeing the girl’s body. This sequence also reminds me of the shower scene of Psycho, because you see ‘Mother’ outside the shower, Janet Leigh screams when the curtain opens, and then she is dead by the sequence end.

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I am sure that most of this has been  covered by other members, I am a little behind, but I found that the suspense that was created by the music and the flow of the story was riveting.  He shows the progression of the the news from the murder scene to the headlines in the lights.  Also the shot of the news trucks going into the streets from inside the trucks was I think and example of the Soviet montage cutting fragmented shots into one.  

As to the Scream of course that is from Psycho and the Golden Curls where like the Curl in the Pleasure Garden and Hitch's blondes in later movies

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 Blonde curls and the theme of voyeurism appear in both films. An obvious murder takes place in the Lodger with dark shadowy figures that set the dark and sinister theme. Where as in the Pleasure Garden the tone is a more lighthearted beginning. 

 

**The close up shots and the different camera angles are a blatant Hitchcock style in both films.

 

The Lodger opening scene when the woman screams with her mouth open, and her big eyes, and the angle of the camera, where no shots are wasted. The other obvious beginning scene is the camera lens going up and down to convey the chorus girls coming down the spiral staircase in The Pleasure Garden.

 

Other screams that come to mind in his later works are: Marion Crane's shower stabbing scene in Psycho. The train scene in Shadow Of A Doubt where the whistling of the train masks the screams of Teresa Wright. The clash of the symbols to mask the screams in The Man Who Knew Too Much.

 

 

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Was that Hitch in the newsroom toward the end of the clip? Had to watch three times before spotting him.

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I hope this is the right discussion thread for this comment. The video interview segment with Hitchcock that went with the lecture and Daily Dose #2 was interesting to me because Hitchcock talked about art versus commercialism. He maintained that film is an art form meant for the masses, for everyone to view, and if one could find a good story to tell and tell it clearly to everyone, he or she could use any technique to get that story across -- as long as it was clear to everyone. Maybe that's part of his appeal: He didn't seem to think elitism had any place in film.

 

Did anyone else watch the video interview and come away with the same impression?

I did, as well. The elements you mention are precisely the reasons that Hitchcock's silent films work so well, and set the tone for his later works. Dialogue isn't necessary given the visual techniques employed. The CU shot of the woman screaming in The Lodger grabbed my attention immediately, and drew me into the action. I am thoroughly intrigued -- and can't wait for more!

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I am truly a novice to Hitchcockian film making.

 

These film clips are very fast moving with a lot of information in a short period of time. I feel more has happened in these film clips than entire movies I have watched. Just packed full of character expression showing clear personality of people in a fast paced world of life in the city. Advances in filmmaking were blockbuster and Hitchcock was able to show his worldly influence to the masses at an intimate level. Both clips show suspense and pull the audience immediately into the world of Hitchcock where time lapses according to his direction. Amazing, I never new. The Pleasure Garden is a view of limited space behind closed doors approach while the Lodger is all eyes with individual interpretation. I love the newspaper truck as it has eyes as well. Truly genius. As for the scream, it had to be the opening scene for effect of immediately grabbing the audiences attention, showing the killer first as shadow man and then the girl meeting her end. If this was anywhere else in the film it would not have the same nail biting experience for the viewer.

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The Pleasure Garden vs The Lodger

Similarities vs Differences

1) lighting in both at the Opening is dark w/ light showing only in dancers in TOG; camera angle is focused on one area(spiral staircase TPG + woman's face in TL)

2) more imagery in TL sets dark, suspense thriller mood vs more title cards (tell the story) in TPG

 

Imagery: Hitch use of CU of faces, eyes show expression & convey drama or humor

For example, screaming woman; woman giving description of TL to cop & reporter both writing it down then from reporter to news desk to the presses to the streets to the air to the people all with very little to no title cards Hitch mounts the suspense through action and facial expression

Also, in TPG men ogle dancers; men plotting to rob Jill, men trying to make a move on Jill inside the TPG show voyeurism.

 

Woman screaming ....i think of Psycho & Vertigo when the woman is falling from the church tower as well as just the CU of Jimmy Stewart's face going in a spiral as he gets vertigo. I know there are more but the ones that come quickly to mind.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 


The shots are tight again, almost claustrophobic. The widest shot is the view of the printing press. The Lodger is almost all medium close-up shots, where The Pleasure Garden uses much wider shots. Both scenes are sparse on words, but The Lodger only has one inter title. The rest of the verbal communication comes through the Avenger's card and the news.


2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 


The victim's scream. All the victims are blond. Quick cutting. Tension.


3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 


He show's you the scream. The score is screaming. Both put you on edge. It reminds me of both Janet Leigh's and Vera Miles's scream in Psycho.


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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? 

Similarity: Fast paced action and audience / crowd reactions that get your attention and draws you into the scene / movie.

Difference:  The subject matter...humor vs dark forboding.

 

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? 

The emotional distress of the witness.  The crowds reaction as the witness tells the policeman her account of what happened.

How Hitchcock lets the viewer see the note and the newspaper and teletype explains the progression of the story.  The crowds gathering around the man with a paper.

 

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work? 

The angle and lighting and extreme close-up of the shot gives an edginess for the viewer.  Hitchcock has used a silent scream in later movies it seems to me.  The look of terror is enough. The imagined scream would be worse than what someone could actually create.  He uses that so much.  Why show things when the viewer imagination is so much worse?  Same with a scream.

 

Bonus:  The man at the paper in the office on the phone with his back to the camera...about 2:50 into the clip.  Gotta be Hitch.

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In the first daily dose, the for the most part, the audience members are leering at the girls on stage, partaking of a guilty pleasure. In the second daily dose, the crowds around the murder victim are drawn to the scene, staring at the victim much in the way people "rubberneck" when passing an accident on the highway. It satisfies a darker, guilty need.

 

In the first dose, humor is light but in the second dose, when the man makes fun of the woman and her description of the killer, it's a dark humor. Sometimes people will use humor to distance themselves from the horror of the situation. But of course some people are simply insensitive.

 

The camera angle and close up of the woman screaming helps to say it all without any words. The horror and terror of her discovery is written all over her face. It made me think of Janet Leigh screaming in the shower scene in Psycho.

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1. Compare the opening of The Lodger to the opening of The Pleasure Garden - what similarities and differences do you see between the two films? The Pleasure Garden sequence is tease, suggesting that there is more to come from the voyeur audience member, the chorus girl who knows she is making the voyeur hot and bothered, and/or the young woman victim of the pickpockets.  What's going to happen?  The Lodger sequence starts with a woman's reaction to a horrific event, and the police, the press and the citizens are immediately reactively sent in motion.   

2. Identify elements of the "Hitchcock style" in this sequence? Please provide specific examples. Even if you are not sure if it is the "Hitchcock style," what images or techniques stand out in your mind as powerful storytelling? Or images that provide an excess of emotion? The opening tight disoriented framing of the woman screaming pulls us in immediately. Also, as the women is comforted and trying to regain her composure, she is started again by the reflection she sees of a man who has pulled up his collar.  The images of people reacting also suggest the lack of control we have over our lives and how events beyond our control can send us scurrying.  The police, the press and and the citizenry are shown as cogs in the reaction machine.

3. Even though this is a "silent" film, the opening image is one of a woman screaming. What do you notice in how Hitchcock frames that particular shot that makes it work in a silent film even though no audible scream that can be heard. And what other screams like that come to mind from Hitchcock's later work?  Even without sound, the full-frame scream grabs the audience; in this instance, she knows something that the audience doesn't yet know.  We don't know what proceeded the scream here, but it is still reminiscent of screams to come later in The Man Who Knew Too Much, Psycho and other films. 

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