Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

Recommended Posts

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? The use of the flappers dancing and falling over the seated couple, the spinning record, and the piano as well as the stringed instruments that are superimposed over other shots implies a sense of vitality to the clip.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. The use of the hallway mirror and the montage of the music with images of his wife kissing the other man works well to create the state of mind of the challenger.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? I think by keeping the men in question apart and only viewed by the hall mirror and switches between the frenzy of the party and the emotions that might be flowing through the challenger's mind is well done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first thing you see is a boxing poster where a lone man is sitting by himself.  He sees the reflection of the woman he loves sitting in the lap of another man.

 

Then, Hitchcock uses music and dancing to again show movement in his stories.  At first, it is only two girls dancing frantically in the room; after a time, they go to chairs and sit, are fanned and given drink to continue the dance.  The competitive dance is a Metaphone for the boxers desire to fight for a title and for the woman. 

 

The music becomes louder and the dancing more frenzied and more people join the dance, as the dancing, drinking and music climax the boxer sees his love falling closer into the arms of his rival.  Then to two lean into to kiss as the mirror goes blank and the boxer is left to his imagination.  Why didn't he fight, was he scared physically or did he feel physiologically afraid because she prefers a "Champ" to one who only dreams of becoming the Champ.  Part of many Hitchcock films is overcoming inner demons to face your fears. 

 

Hitchcock often probes the protagonists' insecurities, self-doubt or physical weaknesses.   James Stewart in both Vertigo and Rear Window.  We see this again in Shadow of  Doubt.  No one can believe Uncle Charles is a serial killer; it is just not possible, despite the mounting evidence.  Then, just when a character knows he/she is right, Hitchcock throws a curveball, which makes the character doubt his or her own eyes.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

he uses many things in this clip the use of mirror's, the camera focused on music instruments, piano keys, record player, the girls dancing.

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The use of the man's point of view shot of looking in the mirror to see his wife sit in another mans lap, and start to see the thoughts go thru in his mind on the left of the screen and what really is happening on the right side of the screen.  As his mind gets more frantic the music and the editing gets faster almost like a merry go round like in strangers on a train.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

He uses doors and mirrors like as a door to the mind of the main character. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.    How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

It causes the scene to move faster as well as cover what is going on at the party in real time as well as what the boxer is imagining in his mind.  Also, how the band instruments are overlaid on the boxers head to show the mental confusion in what he thinks he sees.

 

2.    As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The part that struck me as subjective was when the boxer kept looking over at his wife, sitting with the other man.  It seemed that he was seeing them getting closer and closer; however, in the long shots, they were not that close.  Also, the way the room was set uop, it was easy making him look at two completely different statements about who he is.

 

3.    How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

The way the apartment was laid out, it showed everything that was going on in the apartment. The husband was able to watch his wife with the other man as well as talk to his manage regarding the fight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

To me the use of the music. The happy tune with hint eerie darkness. Showing not everything going in that room is happy. But the scene was very fluid. And I was intrigued . The glances thru the mirror was genius.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

 

The mirror scenes were great seeing eventually lose mind with jealousy - all the chaos around the revelers. Finally enough was enough. So many emotions that scene.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen

 

I think I kinda answered my take on this in the first two questions. I'm no expert in this area. I don't want to pretend I what I'm talking on this part

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


The various sequences throughout this clip express a very surreal ambiance.  With the folks dancing and cheering, alone, they convey a richly appetizing party, yet with the editing, montage, and superimposition, a dreamy and lush veneer coat this man's mind with a dreadful vision of his coquettish wife. 


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


One part that conveyed this protagonist's feeling of hopeless dread was the visual from 3:40 to 3:45.  Seeing his wife flirting with a boxing champion, we see the protagonist's upset disposition, yet we also see his reeling mind.  The playing record perfectly lined up with this man's skull seems to tell the audience that there is no placidity in the moment, and with the thought of betrayal weighing on him, a never-ending cycle of thoughts relentlessly plays on.  The other special effects we see capture the drowsy, unaware fear that one can be exposed to when in a similar situation.


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


The two gentlemen are in separate rooms connected by a mirror.  The boxing champ is lounging among the partying crowd with a girl on his lap and music in his ears.  The cheated partner on the room opposite is alone and contemplative of his future.  The hallucinations of his lover and the other man follow him wherever his gaze lands.  As much as the partyers in the next room dance and sing, the protagonist progressively feels uneasy and explosive. 


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1, There are many activities going on at one time. There are the people in the foreground dancing and laughing. They are people seated around the room laughing and smiling. The scene is controlled chaos. There is one scene where you see what is going on through a mirror. Everyone in this rooms seems to be moving. In contrast to the other room where there is hardly any movement at all. 

 

2. The music is upbeat in the room with all the people in it. It is not upbeat in the second room. We see the main characters point of view even if it is not correct. He is seeing what he is feeling.

 

3. The set design lets the character in the calm room see his wife and he does not have to move to see her. There is so much going on at a hectic pace in the room with the dancing even though his wife his sitting talking to another man. In his mind it leads him to believe he will lose her to this man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? The quick shots of dancing, the pianist, the wife, and the protagonist all show the the speed at which both the party's intensity and the protagonist's fervor are growing quickly.

 

2. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. Two things quickly come to mind; the fact that he sees his wife and the other boxer in what looks like a reflection in the mirror and also the blending of the dancers into the shot of the elongated keyboards. He is seeing through the eyes of jealousy and and not able to see things as they really are.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? The two gentlemen are in two entirely different rooms and even though they are side by side, the "champion's" room is where the party is at and where his wife is whereas he is more or less alone in the other room. The poster of their fight cannot go unnoticed either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? The fast editing enhances the frenetic pace of the party - like a roller coaster ride - while the man witnessing this action from another room is removed yet his view of his wife is framed by the mirror - so we know this woman's actions concern him. The record spinning away on the Victrola is another way he sets the pace of the action.

2. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. Mainly the wannabe's viewpoint - watching his wife through a reflection in the mirror. Like a second hand view, not a direct view.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? Its the wannabe vs the champion, in two separate rooms and career stages. The montages accentuate the anxiety and mounting jealously the wannabe is feeling. We even see what he is imagining is happening - the kiss   - because his thoughts are spinning out of control.  Have to note the treatment of the two crazy dancing ladies. Its like two boxers fighting, the ring sounds and they go off to their corners and are fanned and given refreshment so they can continue to perform.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,  Hitchcock uses the intensity of the dancing shots, the record playing, the wife and the man talking and the look on the husbands face. The dancing and the piano playing seem to speed up.

 

2.  He is watching his wife talk to the man through the mirror.  He is imagining things that are not happening.  He is making himself jealous.

 

3.  The boxing poster is shown numerous times while he is watchin his wife and the other man in the mirror.  The party is taking place in another room but Hitchcock shows them side by side. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DAILY DOSE #3 (The Ring)

 

THE DANCING BIRDS

1. The boxer and his wife see each other through a mirror as she flirts giving both much to reflect upon.

2. The funhouse mirror lens w/ superimposed instruments represent the drunken partiers and his drunkenness with jealousy.

 

3. The ghost image acts as a thought bubble which distracts him from the speaker as it grows and fills the screen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

Hitchcock used montage a couple times - the girls dancing, the musical instruments blending together, and the wife talking to and then finally kissing the champion. Through these montages, he was able to convey the passage of time and move the action along. He also added a vitality to the dancing, because the viewer really went on a musical journey throughout the montage.

 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

 

Hitchcock did this when he showed the main character looking into the mirror and seeing the reflection of his wife with the champion and also during the montage of them talking/kissing, but transposing the shot of them over the guy who was talking to him as well as his face when he is taking it all in.

 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

He increases the stakes in the rivalry by using the aforementioned montages and shots that let the viewer into the main character's mind. Also the mirror, which implies the champion knows he can be seen with the gentleman's wife, but he doesn't care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. It seems like the way Hitchcock presents what is happening in the main room where the party is occurring is very kinetic, lots of activity, then cutting to mini-scenes of some attendees really "breaking down" to the music, the spinning record, the piano player, the dancing girls - it all adds vitality & rhythm to this scene.

 

2. The relative close-up of the first gentleman and then the woman, each looking at each other from a distance in the mirror, each seeming to rather pine for the other one - these type elements put us into the psychological mind of the main characters.

 

3. Hitchcock raises the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen throughout the scenes by, for example, Showing the husband watching the wife with the other man - their being separated by a room but still able to see each other in the mirror. Also, the sequence where the record is fading out, as we see the husband's face, it had the appearance as though his face was about to explode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The use of music was brilliant in this clip. Speeding up the tempo of the piano playing and then speeding up the action of the dancers and the quick shot changes created a build-up of tension.

2. Loved the super-imposed image of the wife and the champ slowly getting bigger and eventually taking over the entire screen, blocking everything out. It artfully conveyed that it was all the husband could focus on.

 

3. The use of the mirror in the set seemed significant. Both the husband and wife could see one another but not completely clearly ... only in a reflection. Maybe it speaks to how we can project our feelings onto others and end up seeing what we want to see, not necessarily what is really there. I thought the use of the title card in which it was said that the other man was a champion and the husband wasn't yet raised the stakes more than anything. It put the images of the wife and the champ in better context and made the jealousy more understandable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

We see that, when the guy sees the other in the mirror, the image becomes bigger and superimposes the whole scene – this is his focus, what is standing out in his mind. He doesn’t even see the other guy talking – he can only concentrate in a scene he is not directly looking at, but is glued to his mind.

The rhythm sensation can be felt when the image of the girls dancing dissolves to the equally toned piano keys, and then many other instruments appear – it’s a whole band in one frame.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

What stands out to me is the use of mirrors. One of the men sees the other through the mirror, with a woman on his lap, and gets jealous. The montage – described in the first answer – is the technique used to show his jealousy, he losing his mind – until he screams at the partygoers.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

I will only watch this film tomorrow in order to see if my hypothesis is right, but I imagine the difference being like this: one gentleman is partying hard, while the other is chatting with his, probably, manager, and focused on the boxing match. And I see that what really motivates the main character is jealousy and the fear of losing his wife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?
Despite the boozing and booty-shaking of the two women in the living room, our hero just can't join in. He sees Mabel in the next room via her reflection in a mirror. She's seated on the arm of Champion Bob Corby's chair, laughing it up, having a grand old time. When Jack's boxing manager says, "It's not necessary for you to take your wife with you. She can stay here," Jack begins to "Walter-Mitty" about just what it will mean if he leaves her here when he starts training tomorrow. Here, the reflection of what's going on in the next room triggers Jack's reflections on how Mabel will wind up in love--and probably in bed--with the champion. (This woman, Mabel, sure seems hot to trot with another man--even with her husband in the next room. Talk about brazen!)

Using a superimposed shot of Mabel and Bob over Jack's manager talking, it becomes apparent we're in Jack's imagination and the superimposed image of Mabel and Bob becomes dominant in the shot, ultimately filling the frame as the two--at least in Jack's imagination--kiss.

​As Jack's imagination begins to run away with him, the dancing girls elongate; the piano keys also stretch, like strands of taffy pulled to the snapping point. These shots brought to mind the surreal dreamscapes designed by Salvador Dali in Hitchcock's SPELLBOUND. 

 

2. As in German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

​Superimposed shots. Bizarre distortion of shots. Hitchcock uses these to convey to the viewer the almost dizzy disorientation Jack is feeling as he imagines the very real possibility of losing Mabel. 


 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

​Hitchcock juxtaposes the disparate moods of separate rooms: the frivolity and sexuality of the living room where Mabel and Bob seem on the verge of "getting it on" at any moment; in contrast, Jack is in what appears to be a sober study talking about his career with his manager. He allows Jack (in the study) and Mabel (in the living room) to watch each other in a hallway mirror. He cuts from Champion Bob Corby, all smiles, on the verge of kissing Mabel to Jack with ever growing concern on his knitted brow.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

German Expressionism in of itself is more about portraying psychological elements through the use of the set and/or camera techniques. The psyche or emotions of the character are shown through the visual. We know more about what our main character is feeling through what Hitchcock shows on the screen. The specific example is when our main character's mind wanders from the conversation he is having as he begins to imagine his wife Mabel sitting next to the champion. He begins to worry and the tension rises as he envisions his wife flirting with the champion, and can only imagine what might ensue if his wife is left there. With the heightened music, we are able to tell that Jack is not a character who trusts in himself, and possibly has issues of jealousy. We know exactly what his mindset is purely because of the visuals of the mirroring of his wife and the champion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

There is movement coming from all corners of the screen.  The images around the room appear a bit darker whereas the center of the room where the girls are dancing appear brighter - everyone is constantly moving to the music..

 

2. & 3.  As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene there ae many shots that are very subjective and put us in the psychological mind of a main character.  Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

 

Seeing his wife's reflection in the mirror as his manager is talking away, you can sense that he is fixated on his wife sitting next to his rival and as the manager continues to talk you can tell by the super-imposed picture of his wife and the rival that the husband is starting to imagine what may happen between the two.  Adding that with the continued liveliness in the next room with the montage of the dancers and the frenzied piano playing bringing Jim's anxiety to the boiling point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

Hitchcock uses montage (the juxtaposition of visuals to create new ideas) to emphasize the distortion created by the husband's jealous feelings. In his montage, the escalating rhythm of the piano music and whirling of the revelers parallels the emotional escalation that the husband feels.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

One of the things he does is to play with mirror images. The wife and husband watch each other through mirror reflections. When the husband becomes jealous, the close-up of his face reveals his breath quickening and his eyes widening. But these physiological signs of his emotional state are accentuated in the visual distortion of the piano keys, symbolically implicating that other reflections may also be distorted.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

Hitchcock places the wife in a room where there are more people than seating. The men occupy the seats which forces the women to stand, dance, or fall on top of the men. This seating arrangement almost forces the wife into the close company of his competitor. The husband must remain in the other room because of business etiquette that prevents him joining in with the revelers, or removing his wife from the awkward situation. The way the film cuts back and forth (between the revelers, the wife's distorted flirtations, the piano keys, and the spinning record) creates a visual competition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it was the first time watching this sequence montage I could tell that Hitchcock used the mirror in the hallway to connect the living-room and the meeting room serving as link into what was being reflected as jealousy against a possible future, all carefully crafted to put us into the psyche of the main character and the reality of what was really happening.

 

Again, You can clearly see from the dance sequence which served as two people fighting in The Ring (and later on each going to their corner for water), to represent the rivalry between the two gentlemen.

 

There's no question that The Ring gives you a total different impression than that The Pleasure Garden and The Lodger, making it a completely different movie experience without taking away the Hitchcock Touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We see Hitchcock use music, dancing, the speed of the record and position of characters to represent and express the inner conflict and turmoil of our young boxer as he observes his wife and opponent getting cozy through the well placed mirror. Eventually these images where it appears his lover is getting to close to his enemy and where the dancers represent the fighters themselves start to appear in ghostlike editing effects showing our young boxers emotions reaching a crescendo. We see him at this point enter the "ring" and approach his opponent and wife to only realize he has given in to his own fears and he apologizes and quickly retreats to be reminded he has a chance to be champion eventually. Placing our wife and husband across corners with the mirror as their connecting point is brilliant and we see in the ring of life how there are more opponents than just our literal one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

- Establishes global environment then cuts to the individual(s) that he wants you to observe, cuts back to established environment to raise awareness of activity surrounding main character.

- Props up a “main” character who is at center of all activity and cuts back to that person often.

- Montage & special effects express interior life of a character in thought.

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

- Montage & special effects express interior life of a character in thought.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

- Long establishing shot – medium – close ups. Characters wearing formal wear that inspires a sense of affluence. Champagne flows freely and creates a sense of carefree revelry.

- The rivalry is enlarged by the fact that discussions are being held in private, away from the revelry.

- Only one perspective on the wide-shot in the room where party is underway

- Creates a skyline in the window to have one assume the party is in a penthouse or hotel suite in a big city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


He uses it to show the increase of the energy levels of each room, as they are paralleled.  He uses it to show the inner thoughts of the main character, and his increasing anxiety.


 


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


The overlaying of the scene where his wife is on the lap of the other man, onto the scene of what he is currently experiencing.  Showing us what is going thru his mind.


 


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


The placement of the mirrors.  The energy levels of the dancing room increase as his anxiety level increases.  


 


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. What I see is the dramatic increase in anxiety within the character, which begins with the mirror, and suddenly fading into a party scene with upbeat, and rather bouncy, yet uncomfortable music that brings it full circle.

 

2. As we see the scene of the couple in the mirror, we also see the main character with a feeling of building anger and hatred. Then, we see a montage, along with a series of overlaying images, which depict what the main character sees in his mind, some of which are rather exaggerated.

 

3. We see a contrast between the room our main character is in and the room next to it, where his wife is. One is more closed and calm, while the other is more open and manic. What brings them all together is the mirror placement. Because he is more focused on the mirror than his manager, he begins to transition from calm and collected to the point where he can't help but forcefully interject between his wife and his rival.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The use of expressive editing in The Ring I found to be quite chaotic without seeing the film. I have watched the film this evening and read lots of posts which enriched the scene for guidance. I felt the main character's mind blew a gasket when I watched it the first time. Complete psychosis. All the musical instruments demonstrated this before he finally snaps out of it. The scenes represented a build up of this brief mental break of things he has no control. The feeling of subjectivity is immediate as the character is separate and not part of the larger scene only listening with a mirrors glance. This leaves the imagination wide open for interpretation and Hitchcock fills his mind brilliantly for the viewers to be part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...