Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

Recommended Posts

1. Hitch uses montage by flitting from the serious scene of the fighter talking to his coach to the more frivolous scene of the party and the dancing girls. This montage shows the conflict between the 2 scenes. The dancing and frivolity add vitality and rhythm and interest to what would otherwise be quite a dull scene.

 

2. One of the techniques Hitch uses is imagination: the fighter seeing his wife in the mirror kissing the champion fighter. Is it imaginary or are they really kissing? Hitch keeps us

guessing.

 

3. Hitch stages the action by showing the wife with the champion sitting close together. Although at the party and to begin with seen to be enjoying watching the dancing girls, they are then shot as if they only have eyes for one another except for when the champion says that he could take her to see the girls on stage and the wife looks at her husband with a worried look or a frown.

 

Set design is used by showing 2 contrasting sets: one with the fighter in a dull room with talk of fighting against another room which is filled with people partying.

 

The editing techniques used are the montage of scenes moving between the 2 rooms and a shot of the "adulterous" couple in a mirror.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because I'm late to the game on this module, I've not partaken in any discussions, nor have I had a chance to read what all the other members have opined.  From the few that I did read, it seems we're all pretty much on the same page.

 

1.  How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?  This suggested topic pretty much covers everything that makes The Ring so representative of Hitchcock during this time, in his beginning career, and yet, is still present in subsequent films.  Hitch uses montage and expressive editing to contrast the quiet, earnest, mien of the husband, Jack, to the fast, and loose antics of the party.  The entire story of the strained relationship is revealed in this way.

 

2.  As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. Aside from the close up shots (which Hitchcock uses so adroitly), the viewer realizes we are going into the mind of Jack by the moving overlay shot of the wife with the other boxer. Because Hitchcock has Jack "seeing" this montage in a mirror, we (the viewers) fully feel Jack's conflict and pain.  We are seeing what he is seeing.  It seemed very realistic to me.  I love how Hitchcock uses "reflection" to convey mystery and confusion.  In that opening scene of The Lodger that we viewed, the distorted reflection of the bystander with his coat pulled up creates a feeling of mystery and terror.

 

3.  How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  rf3OMG, the back and forth between the two rivals, in the same apartment, was breathtaking.  I felt that in that scene, the frenetic dancing and musical instruments were building up to some sort of violent act.  Jack, was sitting quietly in the other room, talking to his manager, but cannot stop thinking of his wife and what she might be doing in the party room with his rival.  We see the montage of the wife while Jack's eyes get huge and seem to turn him into a Jekyll/Hyde sort of character.  I think I've seen that same technique in other Hitchcock films, but I'm blanking on which movie.  It might be the one with Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck, Spellbound, but I'm not sure as I've not seen that movie in a while.

 

As a good director, all the other collaborators on a film should know your "style" and vision for the play/movie/TV show.  That's communicated at the beginning of the process.  Hitchcock illustrates the contrast between the rivals by showing the Champ's group always dressed in formal clothes, while Jack's group or dressed more like "workingmen".  When the wife starts hobnobbing with the 'fast' crowd, her wardrobe gets major upgrades with more jewelry - besides the bracelet - hats, and furs. I watched the movie last night and the final scene was a perfect example of that technique.  I'm more than a little surprised by how much I enjoyed The Ring.  The boxing scene was awkward, but with the technology available, not bad.  Kudos to Hitchcock to try to illustrate being hit by fists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

​What Hitchcock does well in this scene is shows how both the wife and husband are reflecting each emotions by using the mirror to reflect what they are thinking internally.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

What I noticed while watching the film is that as the jealously or rage grows with the husband... so does the speed of the music and the frantic pace of the ladies dancing and the constant need of checking the mirror from both spouses.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

He has one man sitting in a room with enjoying himself with a lady on his lap watching other ladies dance while the other gentleman is pinning over his wife through a mirror while he is being told he is not good enough yet.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hitchcock  cleverly superimposes images of the wife flirting at a party,with distorted images of what the husband sees through the mirror or what he is imagining to create drama and excitement for the viewer. In addition, he focuses on the character's facial emotions in order to give us information on what they are feeling (lust, doubt, jealousy, outrage). The elongated images of the dancers, piano keys and record are reminders of the absurdity of their thoughts and actions..The disparity of the party scene with the jovial flappers and the champ celebrating surrounded by drunken revelry contrasts with the husband in somber conversation with his promoters who put him down ("you're not the champ yet") and remind him that he is to fight for his wife. That statement takes on a different meaning at this point in the story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. In this scene, easily the most experimental of The Ring ​and his previous work, Hitchcock uses almost a wide range of techniques to manipulate reality and get inside the head of one of his characters, here the newlywed boxer played by Carl Brisson. Every edit and manipulation of the imagery expresses the roiling emotions being felt by him at that particular moment, and Hitchcock seems to be having fun trying out different ways of getting those feelings across to his audience. Superimpositions, blurring and stretching the image, and twisting the scenery all help Hitchcock to accomplish his goal with the scene.

 

2. Not only here, but elsewhere in the film as well, Hitchcock uses certain camera angles and points-of-view to get at the subjectivity of his characters. In one of the boxing scenes, the camera points straight at one of the boxers from the other's vantage point, punches being thrown at the viewer to get us in his headspace. In this particular scene, the shot of the husband in the other room scene reflected on the mirror from the wife's vantage point allows us to see how he's become cut off in their relationship in a way that a simpler shot wouldn't have.

 

3. Almost every interaction between the two men increases their rivalry and the emotional stakes involved (the love of the girl). Hitchcock uses every aspect of the production to show how the two are pitted against each other both physically and emotionally. Also, by having the woman being a major character in the film, we understand more fully what these men are fighting for and why they continue to do what they do to obtain her love for themselves.

 

All in all, I find The Ring ​to be the film where Hitchcock seemed to be experimenting more with the visual possibilities inherent in the type of film he was trying to make, in this case a boxing melodrama. It's clear that he was having fun with figuring out how to shoot everything, making sure that the actual boxing wasn't the focal point, but the physical manifestation of the emotional turmoil between the two men over the attention and love of the woman. Something I also found interesting was the seeming reversal of audience expectations. During the first few minutes of the film, I thought that "One-round" Jack was going to be the big, controlling, egotistical boyfriend of the girl and that the other man would be the humble savoir and purer love interest. However, Jack becomes a sadly neglected newlywed and the other man becomes more famous and cavorts with the married girl (All summed up in one beautifully conceived shot, when the man's gift (a bangle) slips down to the girl's wrist just as her new husband puts a ring on her finger.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


T he party sequence is cut particularly fast, compared to the long shots in the boxing meeting. The Montage of jealous rage is also extremely well put together, pulling the different elements from the neighboring party we've been introduced to,  and double exposing them to build up a nightmare of "noises".


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


Double exposing the "what my wife is really doing out there" over the meeting, as in a first person POV, seems very German somehow. Also, individually cataloging the elements of the party (the piano, the ukulele players, the phonograph), which will later appear in the jealous rage build up a sort of pressure between the meeting and the party.


 


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


Separating the boxers via open doors with reflective mirrors certainly is a good place to start. One can't linger around any one fighter without being aware of the other one via reflection. The fact that the fresh-faced boxer's wife is obviously being tempted from the tree of evil by the Champion, in terms of a flapper-filled-no-bars-held party-hard lifestyle seems to completely set an uneven playing field for the new runner-up, who has his chair turned away from the party, and is in a calm, boring room with older men. That room, unlike the quickly cut, busy party in the parlor, is heavy with obligation, responsibilities, and a bit of tenseness. Both about the fight, and about the world that the young buck is getting himself into.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daily Dose #3

 

1. Montage and Expressive Editing - Hitchcock used both to show the differences between the party and the room where the boxer was meeting with his trainers. The quick cuts from the dancers to the pianist to the women playing ukuleles to the record player quickly showed us the energy and fun happening at the party. Cut to the other room and there was little to no montage at all. At the same time, Hitchcock used the mirror's reflection to also demonstrate what was going on in both rooms. The wife can see her husband seated, looking very serious, while the husband sees his wife enjoying herself and indulging in some flirtation with the man he is set to box against. I am not sure if this is considered montage or not, but the fact the husband gets an image in his head about what he thinks his wife and the other boxer are doing and it appears wherever he looks in the room, also helps us see the jealousy he is feeling and it causes him to run into the other room to interrupt the party.

 

2. First of all, the floating image of the boxer's wife with the other man really lets us know what is going on in his head. He is jealous and worried he may lose her. Towards the end of the clip, the loved the way the dancers, piano playing, and other parts of the party were blurred and stretched out (for lack of a better word). To me this conveyed the drunken feeling of the party, but also demonstrated something warped going on, possibly in the boxer's mind.

 

3. Our first introduction is to the serious meeting taking place between the boxer and his trainers/managers. We can tell they are talking business and then we cut away to the reflection in the mirror of the woman (later we realize she's his wife) and the other boxer. At first, we just think he likes her and is envious that everyone is having fun while he is stuck in a meeting. But as time goes by, through his editing and usage of the mirror, as well as the fact the party is in a completely different room, we come to realize he is married to the woman. We see her look into the mirror once where she sees her husband's head averted, not paying attention to her. It saddens her a bit, but she returns quickly to the party fun. Using set design, Hitchcock made the distance between the husband and wife very clear. They are only looking at each other via a mirror and all the times they do, neither of them is looking in the spouses direction. He also made the room with the boxer and his trainers/managers very barren aside from the poster, so it was clear it was all business. In the other room, however, there are instruments, carpets, couches, and things strewn about that let us know a raucous party was going on. The boxer in the barren room sees his wife having all the fun with the other boxer and it fuels his jealousy and plays on his insecurity. The other boxer never looks in his direction, solidifying his own confidence. This makes the other man want to fight him even more because it isn't just a fight for money anymore. If he can beat the champion, maybe he will feel better about himself and his wife will love/respect him more.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. This clip uses the dancers and the piano player to set a festive scene that is contrasted by the quiet of the couple in the chair  who appear to be their on little world. These two scenes give an urgency and chaotic element to the boxer as he is watching and imaging all the worst things. Fear is taking over to the point he leaves reality and sees things very  differently from what they are.  If the scene were slow it would never get to the fevered pitch as it does here.  The way the piano keys are stretches is a nice touch too.

 

2. The look on the husbands face and the way he is torn and looking back and forth between the poster of the fights and his wife. The music even slows down and became serious as he starts to imagine things. Everything becomes blurry as he panics and embarrasses himself in front of everyone and then closes the door in despair. These two scenes become the subject of one man and his frustration.

 

3. First of all the husband is separated in another room which is worrisome to the point he can't concentrate on his future. The mirror is in the perfect spot to give him a view of the possibilities going on with his wife. The going back and forth between the scenes shows that no one even cares about what he is feeling making it seem all the more hopeless. The other man seems to have it all with parties, wealth and girls while he is being reminded of his place and how far he has to go to get to the top. The fading between scenes really makes this point come to life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the use of montage and editing really helped emphasize the fact that some of this is reality and some of this is imagined, and are we even sure which is which? The use of the switching to each room was really interesting, and helped emphasize the contrast between the frantic party (and the frantic imaginings of the boxer), and the relative calm of the boxer speaking with his trainer (?). He definitely feels inferior to the other boxer and feels that his wife will be drawn to that kind of crazy lifestyle, but like I said we aren't sure how much of this is his own anxieties, due to the editing. It's very unsure, and that's pretty cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

The editing adds to the conflict.  I didn’t realize until the end that the couple kissing in the other room was the fighter’s wife and his opponent in the ring (in the future), but I knew he was obsessed with the woman and how she was acting with the man and very upset.  The crazy dancing next to the calm discussion of the fight (which is violence) and then the portrayal of the dancers as if they were fighters in their corners makes the audience confused and wondering who is really the fighters here, what is the real fight about. 

  1. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character.

Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The action is seen very much through the young fighter’s eyes. He can see everything through a mirror, not straight on (symbolic of his indirect perception of what is happening).  Then he can’t look at anything without seeing the couple.  Sound is visualized as the record player and piano keyboard, but those are changed too.  His emotional state distorts even the most direct of perceptions. 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? Again, it’s seen through mirrors, and mirror reflections are always backward.    The older fighter doesn’t seem concerned about the fight.  While I can’t know, I wonder if he is seducing the wife to “mess with” the younger fighter, or if he is really interested in her.  I don’t see what the wife sees in the older fighter.  The shots/takes are for the most part short, except for the dancers, who are frenetic but they are all drunk anyway so no one cares.  Being used to “talkies,” I did notice that the dialogue was not that important and there were only three or four cards with lines in the whole 5 minutes.  He truly did tell the story without a lot of words. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The montage of the party is expressed with the music and quicker shot pace than when in the room with the fighter.  A surrealistic visual of extended piano, superimposed instruments suggests inebriation. A return to slower pace with slower music and a superimposed fighter returns the perspective to the fighter and his resent and fear of his wife leaving him if she can not come.

 

As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

The first the fighter looking to the side and seeing the mirror and showing the action at the party.  Hitchcock shows the ladies falling into the couple's lap and shot switches to the the party from within the room and the events that unfold.  The fighter receives the news that his wife must remain and the mirror again becomes a portal to the party.  This time demonstrating anger resentment that his wife must remain behind.  Return to the room with the promoter and his manipulation.

 

How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

The two rooms are two persoanalities manifest through the visual.  One chaotic with rivalry, the other calmer but a underlying resentment and anger.  As fighter one almost joins the other room, not to join but to confront, he withdraws and apologizes, perhaps realizing that he is not ready.  Which only builds the resentment for fighter two.  Having not seen the movie, I'm intrigued.  Is the real fight not about the fighters, but an internal conflict about his decision?  Is he making the right choice, leaving his wife behind?  No matter the outcome does his wife leave?  If she stays is this the right choice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The gaiety and drunkenness are expressed with elongated keys, high powered almost frenzied dancing, and fun house mirror view of the dancing that completely blurs, not unlike the dancer’s state of insobriety

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

The main character saw his wife in the mirror with the champ enjoying herself.  The expression on his wife’s face after grasping the probable ramifications of going with the champ to see the ladies perform showed a moment of caution.  Party scenes superimposed onto his wife and the champ.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

The main character is in a quiet room in a serious discussion within view of a different room with a more exciting lifestyle that his wife clearly is enjoying on the arm of his competitor and which he cannot yet provide.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.     Hitchcock uses montage and expressive editing to add vitality to this scene,  using shots of the speeded up rhythm of the dancers and musicians interspersed with narrative shots of the scene. He does this in other places, such as The Pleasure Garden, where he lingers on the rhythmic, hypnotic movement of the dancers, and counterpoised movements of several rows.  In the scenes of the party with the window in the background, a foreshadow of the apartment in Rope, he has a depth of field, with three or more rows, each with movement going at crosscurrents to the adjacent zones. He’s also cutting to the shots in the mirror, creating and building the jealousy of Jack , first from a distance and then closer and closer, reversing point of view, opening and closing the scene, and delving into Jack’s psyche.

2.     Hitch puts us into the mind of the One-Round Jack with a montage of shots that go like this: ‘Here’s where you need to be,’ the manager points to the poster; Jack smiles, but in the mirror sees Mabel sitting next to Corby, almost in his lap; a shot of two dancing girls; a close up of Mabel with a deceptive look on her face, now she sees Jack in the mirror, and she plots; the dancing becomes more frenzied until the dancers collapse like boxers; one of the party goers pours a magnum of champagne down her throat; men cool off the dancers by flapping white napkins over them, as if they are boxers in the ring; they get up to dance again, another round; the editing speeds up, more dancers join, the musicians are wailing and the record player spins in a close up; scene fades to Jack still sitting in the other room, his training begins tomorrow; he’s looking toward the other room, thinking of his wife; a close up of his face reveals a transition from jealous suspicion to certainty; a shot of Mabel and Corby in the mirror, now with a double-exposure of them over the scene, ghostly; now he is not actually seeing them, but imagining them about to kiss; the double exposure resolves them into solid form, zooming closer and closer, now back to the dancers, blurry, then distorted to abstract streaks and lines, here Jack’s mind distorted by violent emotion, and tranforms into the elongated piano keys; multiple exposures of the piano keyboard, the furious strumming of the guitars, and the spinning turntable, like the spinning carnival rides, a mechanistic and fatal universe. This perfect storm of images resolve on Jack’s face, tormented by an inner Boschean hell created by his conflicting desires and agitated imagination. He leaves the room, his exit reflected in the mirror where the door closes. It’s training for divorce, Jack says, but the promoter, devil-like, silkenly persuades him to return to his goal.

3.     Hitch uses the action, set design, and editing to increase the stakes between the two men by contrasting the austerity of training that Jack faces in the quiet room with his crew, to the revels and temptations of the hedonistic party-goers, just outside, amplified by the fear of losing his new wife, to a rival that he can’t seem to beat. By juxtaposing these two environments,  along with close-ups of the very expressive emotions of the main characters, and the montage intercutting action with objects, and visual distortion and elongation, Hitch tells a multi-leveled story and lays out Jack’s path ahead.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi! I am Larry G. Johnson, and I totally agree with your description of this daily dose #3. I couldn't have said it better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

He uses montage to depict the passage of time as well as indicate movement. This means he uses it to signify that several things are going on simultaneously. It also allows him to speed up or slow down the narrative.

 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

He uses shadows, lights, reflections and darkness in various way to help frame his scenes and set up the tension onscreen. Uiing these techniques plays with the viewer and draws him/her into what is happening onscreen.

 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? 

 

The way he develops and uses the space between both actors is significant, he stages it so the two actors almost are forced to confront each other because of proximity. The sets are designed to evoke the behaviors that Hitchcock wants to convey. they are often dreary and bleak.The editing is terrific because it creates a pace to the film that never really relents. This allows for edits where the drama is most intense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) silliness of the actors and the actresses...their wildness during the party just the upbeat sound and music, the happy feeling, the warm environment, the laughter, and the being tense--curiosity from the boxer who was looking through a little window in a door and seeing his wife sitting on the knee of his opponent also a good friend.

 

2) Hitchcock uses the Double Exposure...the overlay of the film to give the illusion of a dream-- awake and not. Therefore second guessing himself about a possible affair occurring between his wife and their friend, his opponent.

 

3) the two separate rooms - the office and the living room creating two scenes with a window in the door - almost like it is protecting him from the possibility of losing his wife to a champion. Does he feel like a loser - a failure - or just a man wanting different things?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hitchcock uses montage to add vitality and rhythm to the scene by accelerating the music and showing the people dancing in the room. I actually like this scene because once again it shows the classic Hitchcock style. You can definitely see the influence of German Expressionist films in this scene. It is clear two different things are going on, which shows us the personality of the characters. I think the music kind of helps shows us that. In the beginning, it's very upbeat and playful as you see everyone dancing and carrying on. Nobody has a care in the world. To separate that, he cuts to the other room where her husband is sitting and looking at them through the mirror. The music changes, almost softening up a bit, to show you the different vibes of that apartment.

 

He creates shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character.The music changes and signifies what he's feeling which is jealousy. He increases that by speeding up the music again and showing images of his wife kissing the fighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rapid montage of clips during the dance sequence gives the scene vitality.  Hitchcock switches quickly from close up to scenes of the room, musicians looking excited , a spinning record, and a clip that shows the girls resting, as if in their corners between rounds, and contrasts it with the more sedate scenes in the other room where the discussion is taking place.

 

Hitchcock uses overlapping visuals to help put us into the mind of the character.  While speaking to his promoter, the overlapping visual shows that he is thinking of his wife being with a rival, which increasingly dramatizes the conflict.  Overlapping visuals also dramatize the growing intimacy of the illicit couple against the background of the wild party.  Ultimately, the outburst of the husband brings a halt to the dancing and has everyone staring at him, bringing the scene to a climax of sorts.   

 

The set design puts the rivals in separate rooms which have different activities and atmospheres, but the mirror in the hallway connects the two.  It not only lets the husband see what his wife is up to and this increases his emotions and distrust, but also lets her gaze to the side in a fleeting show of guilt.  It also helps to contrast the two scenarios taking place in the separate rooms, while connecting the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  A montage begins at the 3:05 mark where the party dissolves into the extended piano keys, the musical instruments, and the spinning 78 LP, ending with the kiss.  It’s used to show the source and impact of the music as well as the dark jealous imaginations of the boxer.  The super imposed shot at the 2:30 mark of the champ and the boxer’s girlfriend that pans and drifts across the shot of the promoter is an example of both creative cinematography and editing.

 

2.  Both POV shot and shot/ reaction shot create a look into the mind and psychological state of the character.  Hitchcock uses various reaction shots for the boxer, his fickle or would be girlfriend, the partygoers, and the promoters.

 

3.  The set design of the hallway mirror works to both separate the boxer from his girlfriend and rival and at the same time connect them.  This allow for voyeuristic scheming, jealousy and concern to reveal the various states of mind of the characters.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Hitchcock increases the rapidity of cuts and the distortion to propel us from a point of relative stability (husband and wife in separate rooms, connected only by a mirror) to a frenzy and seeming lack of control. 

 

 

2. He starts by establishing the boxer in a separate room, mildly bored by the discussion with manager and trainer. Slowly, as he begins to connect the boxer to his adulterous wife through the use of the mirror, the boxer becomes more and more isolated, seeming to be the only one not in on the action. 

 

How? Well, he uses the frivolity of the party and the enamored lovers to establish one world. He then connects that world with the manipulative manager by superimposing the lovers' image beside the manager's. This gives us the understanding that, although the boxer is trying to cooperate, he is also aware that deceit is part of the motivation. The sense of isolation grows.

 

Increasing the rapidity of the cuts, distorting the dancers then the piano keys and spinning record, he increases the torrent of emotion we feel coming from the boxer. He caps it with the boxer's leap to the door and screaming. Everything comes to a jolting halt, and again the boxer is isolated, more so now.

 

3. At this point, my answer is tending towards redundancy. First, he separates the couple, connected only by the mirror. He sets two complete different tones in each room. The increasingly rapid cuts and intensified action of the distorted party scene and scenesters spins the action out of control. We're left with one boxer feeling more isolated and foolish and the other increasing his hold on the situation. Thus, this imbalance will need to resolved, and only the two boxers will be able to get that done.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.Hitch adds vitality and rhythm in this scene by speeding up the rate of cuts as the music speeds up until the whole room in dancing. 

 

Also, did anyone else think of a drugged out version of Renee Zellwegger and Catherine Zeta Jones in Chicago when watching the two girls dance?

 

2. Hitch is able to create a feeling of subjectivity by administering close-ups to focus on the eyes of the boxer, intermixed with distorted images of the piano and record player in effect showing his mounting anxiety of leaving behind his wife to the debauchery of the neighboring crowd. 

 

3. Hitch's use of the mirror between the couple in adjoining rooms, as well as the superimposition of the wife in another's arms to show the boxer's fear of what leaving his wife might entail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Hitchcock uses montage to add a somewhat chaotic rhythm to the scene so the audience can relate to the chaos running through the main characters mind as he watches his wife speak to another man.

2. Hitchcock puts us into the main characters mind as we watch his wife speaking with another man in close proximity through a mirror. By cutting to the mirror, then to the dancers, back to the mirror and seeing the main characters reaction, the audience is able to see the jealousy on his face. His mind is spinning like the record, the thoughts are running through his head haphazardly like the women dancing in the middle of the room. The scenes within the montage fade into each other. He envisions his wife kissing another man and he yells at the lively room to stop ultimately stopping his thoughts from running wild.

3. Hitchcock uses the montage as an editing technique to show the main character becoming more jealous. He places the action outside of the room where they are speaking about the fight. This room has women dancing, alcohol, a piano playing along with a record spinning. The audience can see the the main character losing control of his thoughts when he envisions his wife kissing his competitor as the scene moves faster. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her

Scene from Hitchcock's The Ring (1927)

 

1. Hitchcock uses montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene by having carefully chosen close-ups of a man and woman on a chair seemly hugging and kissing. Another close-up of a man in a different room with eyes glaring at the couple. The music added to the vitality of the scene and the rhythm is when he pieces together different fragments of the shots together like when the picture of his wife and the man sitting with her are placed next to her husband face.

 

2. Various techniques Hitchcock used to create that feeling of subjectivity in this scene were emotions like laughter, fear, boredom, anger. Another technique is the camera as it moves from the guest in one room to the gentlemen in another room. Point of view shot is another technique where an idea is placed into the mind of a character without explaining it - the woman's husband.

 

3. Hitchcock sets the stage by introducing a boxing event advertisement and a meeting of three gentlemen in one room and guest in another room involved in frolicsome acts of dancing around and playing with each other. The set is designed so the audience and characters can see each other in both rooms. Editing techniques used started with a close-up of the actor and cuts to a shot of what he is seeing and then back to the actor to see his reaction. Tension builds when the actor walks into the room where his wife is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The party scene is dynamic with the music and action. The scenes alone with the fighter are slower, more even. The superimposed instruments suggests drunkenness. Trick shots using views in the mirror heighten the tension with the wife and the second man.

 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

Hitchcock shows the ladies falling into the couple's lap and shot switches to the the party in the room and his wife frolicking with another man.  The fighter is told his wife must remain and the mirror becomes a portal to the party.  In the end, the fighter reveals his quiet contemplation, followed by a sinister smile.

 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

The two rooms represent two personalities.  One chaotic with rivalry, the other calmer but a jealousy and anger.  The editing is key to building the tension between the main character and his rival, his wife, and the promoter. The eerie grin once he's made his decision is creepy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The party scene is full of chaos and movement with the flappers dancing and the party guest drinking and dancing as well. Edited together with the more intimate scenes between the husband and wife it creates a tremendous amount of tension in the scence.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...