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Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


 


The party scene cuts between shots showing drunken clumsiness, wine being poured, music being played on an instrument and a record player, and dancing. This gives a carefree merriment to the scene.


 


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


 


The scenes between the husband's wife and the man on the chair show a growing familiarity between the two characters that ends with them kissing. When the fighter bursts into the party room, we see that this was all in his imagination.


 


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


 


I thought the use of the mirror as the window between the two rooms was very clever. The husband watches with growing jealousy as his wife converses with the established fighter, but it's the wife that looks back at the mirror and sees her husband. To the husband it seems like the established fighter has everything he wants: a career as a famous fighter and even his wife (in his imagination). 


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I think this is a remarkable scene! Both experimenting and away of its time! It combined the agony and the thrilling sentiments in a perfect visual sense! Great!

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

A.) Hitchcock utilizes the montage along with the imaginative sequence of the boxer. The dance party is vibrant and the shot is energetic.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

A.) We are shown the mind state of the Boxer who thought that the Champion boxer was flirting with his bride, only to be shown that he was in illusion and his mind was probing thoughts.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

A.) Hitchcock knows very well how to create shots which brings the contrasting facts together. Here, we can see that the defeated boxer is sitting in a silent room where he was discussing about his next match with other men and on the other room, his bride was sitting along with the Champion boxer where the dance party and vibrant music takes place. Thus, we could see the opposites (i.e. Quiet x Noisy) in this scene.

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post-60817-0-23379400-1502020456_thumb.jpg

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