Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

Recommended Posts

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The pacing of the editing creates a sense for the viewer of the party starting to spin out of control, with both the shots themselves becoming shorter and shorter as the scene plays out and the camera itself hopping from spot to spot within the scene. At first we have a standard shot taking in the entire party, then a standard shot of Mabel and the Champ talking. The party shots get shorter, and the Mabel/Champ shots get closer as the scene develops until finally the party devolves into a rapid-fire series of quick shots of smaller and smaller pairings of partygoers and tighter and tighter shots of Mabel and the Champ.

 

This is mirrored by the pacing and framing of the action in the other room, as the sequence begins with leisurely overview shots and devolves into the rapid-fire expressionistic montage sequence. Interestingly, this physical scene does not resolve but rather maintains a quickened (though not rapid fire) pace through the falling action of the promoter conversing with Jack -- we get shorter, quicker shots here than in the beginning of the sequence, perhaps denoting a continuing sense of tension on Jack's part.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

As many others have mentioned, the fantastic "breakdown" sequence all in Jack's mind with the overlapping images of Mabel and the Champ, the distorted piano and instruments, the spinning-too-fast record player. The music-focused portion of this sequence work, to me, on a doubly subjective level, as I don't believe Jack is literally seeing that in his mind; rather, the out-of-control music signifies the extent to which Jack's worry and fear is spiraling out of control, reaching a crescendo with the imagined kiss.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? 

 

The dual portions of this set are used so cleverly! The party room is much larger and more open with its window overlooking a vibrant nightlife scene. It's all glitter and glow, with enough room for two women (then a crowd!) to dance enthusiastically. The overall effect suggests an expansiveness and perhaps a permissiveness on the part of Mabel, the room's primary inhabitant as the story is concerned.

 

Contrast that with Jack's relatively cramped quarters. Even his chair seems to close in on him, where Mabel's perch is more free. The darker walls and lack of windows suggest Jack feels trapped by his circumstances, which he himself reinforces by closing the door after he interrupts the party. He chooses to shut himself off from his wife in a literal sense, but also from the world in a more subtextual sense.

 

I especially also liked the use of the mirror as a way for the husband and wife to secretly observe each other. Because of the Champ's positioning, he cannot see Jack in the other room and remains oblivious -- perhaps purposefully so -- to the havoc his flirting is causing. He literally has turned his back on the other boxer, a sure sign of how little the Champ thinks of Jack -- of course he's also openly flirting with Jack's wife, so the Champ's feelings are perhaps not well hidden anyway ;)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

To me, it's not about vitality and rhythm though obviously that is there. The whole sequence is about the emotional state of the boxer. It is clearly using the same techniques of a film montage, but not to compress a lot plot-related info into a short period of time. It is a montage showing what is going on in the head of the boxer. I'm sure I've seen this before, but never thought of it as a montage, though clearly it is.

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

It starts very  normal although it seems like the music and dancing is exaggerated. I always imagine Brits being very proper and dignified. This has the feel of Berlin in the 20s or a Jazz club in Harlem. About half way through, it gets subjective. before he was watching his wife through the doorway. They then superimpose a close shot of the man's wife and the other man. You are seeing details that he couldn't possibly see from where he is, this is no longer what is happening, but what is happening in the mind of the boxer. This almost makes you project back on what you had seen earlier. The dancing in the other room. Was that what was really happening or was that what the boxer imagined was happening? Clearly, he couldn't have seen that from where he is. Then it gets even more subjective. The dancers and piano keys getting distorted in a fun-house mirror effect. More musical instruments and a spinning record are superimposed on the distorted piano keys. This is no longer just music and dancing, but an **** of music and dancing. Then final straw the image of his wife kissing the other man. Then we see the reality of situation. His wife is just sitting with the other man, but no arms around him. The women are not dancing the Charleston, they're just standing talking, no musicians can be seen. Were they just listening to a record? Was there even music at all?

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

There's the separation of the two. What the man must do as an up and coming boxer, being separated from his wife. Then his wife being left alone in a decadent society and with the other man there to keep her company. In terms of sets, at the beginning with all of the dancing, the other room seems huge like a dance hall. But toward the end of the clip when we see the other room as it really exists, it seems small and cramped just an ordinary sitting room.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Each technique Hitchcock employs, be it by montage or by expressionism, serves to emphasize the heightening tension the sober, disciplined athlete is feeling. He observes, as if through a window, the fun and frivolous life he must forego to attain his goal of winning the championship. He ultimately sees the social whirl threatening even his romance. He's psychologically quite ready to fight by scene's end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, is that Ian Hunter? I love Ian Hunter. Ok, moving on.

 

1. Quick cuts indicate intensifying emotion

    Superimposed images of the lovers indicate the boxer's preoccupation

    Distortion of the images indicates perhaps malignant thinking

    The use of quick cuts in addition to superimposition in addition to image distortion indicates climax

 

2. The boxer's subjectivity is shown by the fact that he imagines his wife actually kissing the other man

    when we can see clearly that they're not kissing. The warped dancers and warped piano keys show

    us that the boxer is experiencing these things as traumatizing and painful whereas the wife seems to

    be experiencing them as harmless fun. She can see the whole room and the boxer can only see 

    through the mirror and through his imagination.

 

3. By staging action in two different rooms, he's able to use the mirror as a psychological portal.

    He's able to contrast the room full of men & trophies with the party of dancing girls.

    The boxer is forced to go into a different room to speak to his wife but isn't protected from 

    seeing her in another man's lap.

  

Great scene!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The action moves from the party to another room where the boxer is planning his strategy to win back is wife.  The mirrors allow the boxer to see the actions of his wife with his rival and the exciting life she seems to prefer.  The montage sequence allows us to get a glimpse of what the boxer is thinking about the situation.  The pace, action of the sequence creates a sense of urgency and desperation on the part of the boxer.  

 

Regarding subjectivity, the wife may be seen as a golddigger, we know the boxer loves his wife and will do anything to win her back. We learn very little about the wife's motivation.  Our empathy is with the boxer and the montage reveals his desperation. 

 

The creation of two rooms and placement of the mirrors in this sequence allows the boxer to see the flirtation between the boxer's wife and the rival.  Perhaps he sees more than what is really happening due to his jealously.  The music and genreral party atmoshere in one room adds to the resentment of the boxer who is afraid he is losing his wife.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, is that Ian Hunter? I love Ian Hunter. Ok, moving on.

 

1. Quick cuts indicate intensifying emotion

    Superimposed images of the lovers indicate the boxer's preoccupation

    Distortion of the images indicates perhaps malignant thinking

    The use of quick cuts in addition to superimposition in addition to image distortion indicates climax

 

2. The boxer's subjectivity is shown by the fact that he imagines his wife actually kissing the other man

    when we can see clearly that they're not kissing. The warped dancers and warped piano keys show

    us that the boxer is experiencing these things as traumatizing and painful whereas the wife seems to

    be experiencing them as harmless fun. She can see the whole room and the boxer can only see 

    through the mirror and through his imagination.

 

3. By staging action in two different rooms, he's able to use the mirror as a psychological portal.

    He's able to contrast the room full of men & trophies with the party of dancing girls.

    The boxer is forced to go into a different room to speak to his wife but isn't protected from 

    seeing her in another man's lap.

  

Great scene!

Yes, that IS Ian Hunter!  I love him too.  And just a month ago I had the privilege to meet his granddaughter, a British Shakespearean actress who was so thrilled that I knew of her grandfather as King Richard in the film the Adventures of Robin Hood.  Lovely woman.  Thanks for bringing up Ian Hunter's name.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

...

- The spinning circles of the vinyl record are superimposed on Jack's head, which makes it seems like the cogs of his mind are spinning out of control!

...

 

Good point, his head is definitely spinning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the analysis of the scene by the other posters has been pretty thorough but I do have one observation that I haven't seen mentioned.

 

Since the fighter can only observe his wife and the champ through the mirror and not anything else that is taking place in the party room, is the whole scene we see of the wild party with drunken dancing and carrying on taking place all in his mind? When he actually enters the party room, the actions of the people we see are nothing like what the party scene seemed to show. Everyone is relatively sedate. His wife is next to the champ but they are not all over each other. I feel that he was only seeing his wife in the mirror and imagining the wild party. He seems to be excessively jealous and worried about his wife's fidelity (Othello?) and easily able to imagine that she would be acting overly flirtatious and seeking to start an adulterous affair. Was the whole opening wild party just his jealous imagining?

 

By the way, did anyone notice how much the actress playing the wife looks like Betty White? :) 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. When the party starts to get a surreal and quicker cuts, Hitchcock is expressing how the booze is effecting the mindset of the drunk partying goers. This surrealism contrasts with opposite viewpoint of the protagonist who is sober as all of the shots with him are static, clear and have a slower rhythm.
  2. Its in the way our protagonist spies on his wife in the other room with a mirror, its our protagonist’s point of view. And with using the cross fade juxtaposition of the wife and other fighter flirting with each, as the manager is explaining the game plan, this shows the audience that our protagonist’s mind is only on whats happening with his wife and it starts to wander towards her infidelity, he barley pays attention to his manager and it starts to fill him with a simmering anger and contempt for her. This leads to the end of the surreal sequence as it has become to much for our protagonist as he shouts at the party goer’s killing the mood and party all together.
  3. Hitchcock stages them in two different rooms one that is vivid, smoking, and scattered with drunks with two dancers putting on a show in the center of the room giving the atmosphere of a wild party. This tells us the rival fighter is someone who is care free and likes to have a good time with friends. While in the other room that seems to be a study it is plain and less decorative and is of our protagonist’s mindset: strict and focused, he’s plaining his fighting career while a party happens in the next room and can’t be bothered its debauchery that is also corrupting his wife.

post-73866-0-72942600-1498680991_thumb.gif

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps the most obvious techniques Hitchcock uses to add vitality to this segment of the film are the music itself and the dancing girls, one of whom collapses because of the frenetic pace.  Additionally, Hitchcock establishes the quick tempo by using a series of shots that he stays on for an average of about 7-12 seconds at a time, perhaps a bit longer for the dialogue in the adjoining room.  With all due respect to the more contemporary film maker, Baz Luhrmann, the technique woks for Hitchcock while it ruined the remake of The Great Gatsby in 2013, where at times Luhrmann would focus on one shot for no more than 1-2 seconds, often including more than 250 shots in a span of 10 minutes.  The pacing was much better in The Ring.  It was necessary to establish the levity among the revelers in the one room while also establishing the rising doubts and suspicions of the fighter in the other room.  And Hitchcock got it right.  For me, another technique that Hitchcock used to establish these doubts and suspicions is subjectively viewing the party through a mirror, which of course does not accurately portray reality.  In a mirror, we see the opposite, and sometimes we see what we want to see.  And Hitchcock, I think, accomplishes both with these mirror shots.  Or does he?  We see the woman (the fighter's wife?) sitting with the man, enjoying the dancers.  When the man suggests taking her to see their show later, what does her look suggest, that she is thinking of going to the show with this gentleman, in essence cheating on her husband, or is she conflicted, not wanting to cheat?  So does the mirror truly reflect how she feels, or does it reflect the fighter's unwarranted suspicions? (unless I really missed the point here  :()  Hitchcock also uses other effective techniques to develop the fighter's suspicions and frenetic thoughts.  First, the repeated shots of the vibrant dancers and the spinning phonograph record might suggest the fighter's irrational thoughts quickly approaching an erroneous conclusion?  And just as his thoughts are becoming distorted, so are the keys on the piano, for me a technique reminiscent of the skewed angles and distortions in the film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, another film that also establishes a frenetic pace and an air of uncertainty.  Finally Hitchcock has the fighter play out his visions to their irrational conclusion by superimposing the image of the man and woman drawing closer together and finally kissing over the image of the promoter (?) agent (?) talking to him about the upcoming bout.  In essence, the audience is given a visual of the fighter's thoughts during his conversation.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed the use of Hitchcock’s great editing during the party seen as he shows the women dancing from all different views; from the front, from the back, close-up and even in a wide party seen. Using this technique created a more frantic tiresome dance scene making me feel tired just watching the dancers!

 

I felt the scene where the husband began to imagine his wife kissing the other man while another scene is coming into view overlaying the wife scene put me into the psychological mind of the main character. Hitch take us into the imagination of the husband while at the same time we see the reality of the event is that she is NOT kissing the other man. That scene allows us to feel the same anxiety the husband is feeling.

 

For me, Hitchcock uses these techniques by visually allowing us to see what is going on in the husband’s mind as his jealousy rages. Using the blurred wavy technique on the women and into the piano playing scene seemed to increase my feeling, along with the husband’s, that he was delirious with jealousy and letting his mind drift out of control.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the analysis of the scene by the other posters has been pretty thorough but I do have one observation that I haven't seen mentioned.

 

Since the fighter can only observe his wife and the champ through the mirror and not anything else that is taking place in the party room, is the whole scene we see of the wild party with drunken dancing and carrying on taking place all in his mind? When he actually enters the party room, the actions of the people we see are nothing like what the party scene seemed to show. Everyone is relatively sedate. His wife is next to the champ but they are not all over each other. I feel that he was only seeing his wife in the mirror and imagining the wild party. He seems to be excessively jealous and worried about his wife's fidelity (Othello?) and easily able to imagine that she would be acting overly flirtatious and seeking to start an adulterous affair. Was the whole opening wild party just his jealous imagining?

 

By the way, did anyone notice how much the actress playing the wife looks like Betty White? :)

Oh my...I, too,absolutely DID notice how much the actress resembled Betty White!  :D  And good point about the wildness of the party scene being only in the husband's mind.  I missed that...but can see it now.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The husband and wife are apart physically at the party. She's in the room where the party is taking place while he's in another room talking business. But there's an emotional distance, too. They can only see each other reflected in the mirrors. She's married but is having no problem flirting with the guy she's sitting next to. When the guy says that the next time they go out, he'll have to take her to see the dancers' show, she looks excited at the idea, likes the "good life," but then catches sight of her husband's reflection in the mirror and her smile fades. It's like she's thinking, "yeah, but what about him?"

 

The spinning record reflects the spinning thoughts of the husband in the other room. The superimposing of the image of his wife sitting next to the guy over the scene him sitting in the other room helps shift the drama from what's actually happening at the party to what the husband is becoming more and more preoccupied with in his thinking. The image finally becomes so big that we realize he's feeling overwhelmed with anxiety about what will happen if she stays behind when he leaves for training. He even says he'll be training for a divorce. He doesn't feel he can trust her. The distorted images reflect his distorted thinking. He's going to have to become a champion in order to hold on to her! Not a great commentary on the state of their marriage!

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think vitality and rhythm are accentuated through the near constant movement of the party goers. The music sets a tone, but no-one is still....even the seated people in the back of the room are in motion. Moving between montage footage of musical instruments and the people maintains and propels the energy and action.

 

We are invited to share Jack's paranoia in the way that Hitchcock superimposes the playing musical instruments over images of his wife and rival Bob, distorts and elongates the images and allows the music and energy levels to climb. While we understand and perhaps are inclined to share Jack's suspicions of infidelity, the fact remains he is becoming unbalanced and is helpless to stop himself...most notably when he bursts into the party room to stop the (imagined?) kiss. We understand, yet we are disturbed.

 

Careful editing which bounces between the manager, Jack and the wife escalates the rivalry between Jack and Bob. The manager almost seems to taunt Jack, by suggesting that leaving his wife in the clutches of his rival will give him something greater to fight for that just a win. We, as viewers, begin to hate this rival almost as much as Jack does.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

​He uses one room, as a wide and long shot, as if the viewer is in the room too. 

​There is the use of many hands playing instruments.  Hitchcock would use hands as a focus in many of his movies, North by Northwest, & Shadow of a Doubt, being 2 of them.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

​Again, Hitchcock makes the character (and the audience) the voyeur.  He is looking in the mirror, watching the party in the next room.  His thoughts takes over, with eyes widening, superimposing his thoughts to his wife on the lap of a man.  His trainer is talking and soon the screen shifts, the trainer fading away and the women coming to the front of the scene.  The music, dancing, hands playing is almost nightmarish. 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

​In the set design, the mantle has 2 photos of boxers at opposite ends, facing each other, showing a rivalry.  At minute 2:13 the 3 men in the scene are staged standing as a triangle.  And the music, the "stretching" out of the dancers and keyboard is showing music and dancing to be corrupting. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1) How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

Hitchcock add vitality and rhythm by having two beautiful flappers dance around enjoying the evening with friends. 
 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity?

Hitchcock puts us in the character mind just as he turn to the mirror to see his wife on someone else lap, flirting.
Main character is enraged with  jealousy while the promoter is takling to him about his big fight. The boxer mind goes on  thinking his wife is cheating on him.
 
3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? 
 
Hitchcock set the stage by wife and husband being acroos the room from each other but having the mirrior to see each other by. Rivarly start right after the husband see's his wife flirting and sitting on the man lap.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

The overlay of imagery is a representation of shared space and time. Things are going on simultaneously. The beat and construction of the music drives you forward, going on and on… and yet, not everyone is sharing in it/experiencing it/reacting to it. There is the room full of people, noise and activity… which almost feels as though the setting is in color… to me, it is red (anger/vitality/”stop”). And then there is the man sitting quietly in a chair in the next room, as though he cannot hear the music or commotion. He feels like he’s appropriately in black-and-white (from the viewer's perspective). Emotionless/emotion-free. Impassionate. And yet, underneath the calmness, there is that look in his eyes… as he notices the scene of his wife in the arms of another man in the mirror.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

I’m answering #2 and #3 together:

 

The mirror offers a few perspectives: 1) reflection/self-reflection of both the husband and the wife, separately looking into the mirror; 2) there is the voyeuristic effect of looking into a place that you are not actually in and watching someone who is there; 3) the image in the mirror is reversed from reality. It seems that both the man and the woman who look into the mirror to watch each other are at odds with each other. Both watching each other from afar… but since the image is reversed, can it be trusted? Is it reality? Is there duality?

 

Both main characters are sitting. The man alone in the next room; the woman on the lap of another man in the midst of the party. It's like an "alone togetherness" for the husband and wife, though they are both in rooms that have other people in them.

 

At 2:30, there is an image of the other man and the first man's wife together superimposed on the same image as seen by the man (husband) when he looks in the mirror. They are reverse images of each other, showing that what the man is seeing is both real and unreal. And his focus remains on his wife and the other man even when he turns away from his view of the mirror. The superimposed image gets larger and larger as it takes over the husband's mind.

 

The music is softer when focused on the man; louder and faster when focused on the woman in the party room. But the image of his wife with another man is louder than any music or speaking going on around him. It’s his sole focus. Then the crazy music acts as both a distraction from the intimate scene, but also ramping up the emotions the man must be feeling watching his wife… as well as the emotions heating up between his wife and the other man.

 

Everything gets warped and tangled up because that’s what the man is feeling… life is losing its order and becoming chaotic. A blur. Crazy.

 

The husband shuts it all out by closing the door on the party and the mirror — his means of seeing what’s happening before him. Now, the man is up and walking around rather than sitting passively in the chair. And then he and the two men he's with make the comparison between himself and the other man, vying for the same woman -- one who technically has her (by marriage) and the other who actually has her (by affection).

 

The husband seems to be fighting with himself and his emotions more than he is fighting "for her".

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The pacing of the editing pulls the viewer into the party so they become a participant. As the dancers quicken the pace it gives the illusion of the tension raising with the husband as he watches his wife from the other room. This is done through the use of mirrors so he can't see all of the activity in the room. Also the close ups of Mabel and the Bob leave much to the imagination to Jack. As in many of Hitchcock's films much is seen through the characters eyes and perspective.

 

2. As stated above the scene is largely seen through Jack's eyes and imagination. What plays with his mind is the increasing speed of the music and the innocent discussion of Mabel and Bob using mirrors. The scene ends when Jack crashes in the other room only to realize he imagined all of it. But one could also assume that when he returns to the other room and closes the door, he is closing that chapter of his life. . Hitchcock learned this technique while studying German and Russian films. This technique can been seen in the movies M and Battleship Potakin.

 

3. This is done by setting the scene up in two different rooms. The one where Mabel is at it's a lively and almost out of control party. The other is Jack in a smaller room with him watching his wife through mirrors. The size difference between the rooms gives the viewer that Mabel's world is expanding and Jack's is closing in.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

Hitchcock's use of montage adds vitality and rhythm to the scene using the elongated piano and then adding additional instruments. First, one strumming like a guitar, a second beating drums, and third another guitar, then finally the spinning record, as if the whole thing is spinning out of control.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity.

 

As noted earlier by other students, Hitchcock's use of the mirror creates tension between the two rooms and husband and wife.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

Hitchcock shows that the young lady, the wife, is interested in living life so much so that she's flirting with the other boxer. Her husband is in the other room taking care of business. The way this is staged Hitchcock places the young lady as a part of the rivalry between the two men not just the boxing ring, Hitchcock liked to use romantic triangle as can be seen in Rebecca, North by Northwest, and The Birds for example.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is in some ways different from what we think of as suspense which is what Hitch is know for.  I have not seen the movie so there may be some of that later.  It is interesting to see the use of the mirror   to reflect the emotions and actions.  Also the use of movement with the dancers and how it increases as the clip moves on.  When watching the use of the instruments and there spinning record.  made me think of the thoughts that are going around in his head and the dizzier he becomes because he is not sure what is going on with his wife.  The Wife sure did look like Betty White.  Could be her twin.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

I liked what Hitchcock said in the interview segment in today's lecture notes. I had never really thought about a montage being a way to give lots of information in a short amount of time. In writing we'd call that an information dump. That's not such a good thing in writing, but in movies it can be a nice little break from the action, while still giving vital information the audience needs.

 

In the case of this scene from The Ring, Hitchcock uses the devise of the husband being in one room seeing the dancing and his wife sitting on the arm of a chair next to another man. Then in the montage sequence the husband imagines his wife kissing the other man, and the distorted dancers, piano, and other musical instruments reflect his inner thoughts and mood.

 

I think what I just wrote applies to the second question as well. The husband's assumptions about his wife and the other man are distorted. And perhaps the music adds to his irritation.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

 

I loved the use of the mirror. The husband and wife see each other's reflection in the same mirror. That's interesting. We see her reaction to something the man beside her said, while she's looking at her husband's reflection. As the scene goes on and the dancing becomes more raucous, the husband's emotions get more heightened and dark as he imagines things that are not happening between his wife and the other man and finally yells something. He apologizes to the people in the other room. Then he goes back to the other two men and shuts the door almost as if he wants to shut out what he suspects about his wife and the other man. What his manager says to him seem to make him determined to do well on his next fight.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just watching the new Twin Peaks on tv this week, and there was a lot of iconic David Lynch-esque surrealism in the episode. I loved it. In this bit of The Ring, I felt Hitchcock was using the montage or expressive editing to enhance the viewer's understanding of what the boxer was going through. Maybe booze was going to his head. Maybe his lady love's flirting with another man was causing him confusion and even pain, affecting his mental state.  It was a very effective technique, I think. Hitchcock wasn't afraid to try new things here and throughout his career. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

As the scene slips into a montage the rhythm of the scene slows while the pace picks up. I am not sure if that makes sense to everyone but when I see a scene like this I listen to the music and watch each visual carefully. There is a lot of focus on what the character is seeing and what the character sees slows everything down. When the focus is on him and we are given insight into what he is feeling the pace speeds up. 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

I jumped and yelled out when the husband first say his wife through the reflection in the mirror. That shot is fantastic and adds to what we are given in there very next moment. It splits off into the husbands thoughts as  he pictures his wife and the other man as she talks to him. The focus on the husband as he is obviously obsessing and the focus on music and the blurring screen. 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

The mirror scene adds a sense of voyeurism a common theme throughout Hitchcock films and one of my personal faves. The music and the appearance of the piano keys give you a look inside the psyche of the husband. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

   

    The whole atmosphere conveyed is of a frenzied party: Dancers are dancing very      

    wildly shown in wide shots and closeups, guests dancing in the background, then      

    cutting to a shot of the piano player bouncing up and down, cutting to the record

    playing, then elongated shots of the dancers and piano keys almost swaying, with the

    superimposed images of the guitar and banjo players' hands, flying fingers of the    

    piano player.      

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

    The main character's point of view is apparent from the first (brilliant) shot of the mirror     with his wife and her admirer (The Champ?) on the chair in the living room.  The subsequent mirror perspective shots, show the the main character's increasingly wild imaginings superimposed on the reality of the mirror shots and of the promoter speaking to him, and the cuts to the wild, elongated shots of the dancers and the piano keys and superimposed musical instruments clearly express his inner turmoil, rising to an outburst.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

    Perhaps the elaborateness and opulence of the party--the apartment, the    

    champagne, the guests, the entertainment, (including the 2 dancers who are          

    performers of some repute), are beyond the main character's means, but not The 

    Champ's.  The Champ seems very secure with the wife of the protagonist. The shots of the          boxing poster also make his position in that world clear.  The cuts from the shots of

   the wife with The Champ to the main character, make it clear there is rivalry between

   the two men.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

The dancing sequences create a frenetic rhythm that contrasts with the apparent seduction of the wife and the business like discussion with the main character by the boxing promoters.

  1. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The most obvious is the classic Hitchcock technique of showing the main character looking at his wife in the other room, showing us what she is doing, and finally cutting back to show the husband’s reaction. Also, since the idea of his wife with another man is beyond his ability to conceive, Hitchcock uses superimpositions of the dancers to show the confusion. The contrast in the rhythm of the two actions (the dancers and the wife sitting on the lap of the champ) creates confusion in both the audience and the main character. This keeps building which creates anticipation on the part of the audience that a climax is about to occur, only to discover that it doesn’t.

  1. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

The crosscutting between the champ talking with the wife on his lap and the main character sitting, relatively calm, and hearing about how he will train for the championship while his wife stays there creates a tension both in rhythm and meaning. This is further enhanced through the cuts and dissolves showing the increased rhythm of the dancing girls.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...