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Daily Dose #4: Depends on Your Point of View (Scene from Downhill)


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The tracking shots made me feel the tension and dread of those moments...the boys walking slowly towards the headmaster.  I like how this replaced music and sound in creating that tension.

 

I think Hitchcock used this technique for the reason I cited.  It creates a mood in the scene without sound, much like the glass floor in The Lodger created the pacing in the room above.

 

The use of montage is the common element in the previous clips.  In the case of The Ring, it showed the fighter's paranoia regarding his wife's behaviour with his rival.  In Downhill, we see the woman's point of view or version of the story.

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The effect of the dolly POV shot when the boys are approaching the headmaster is more than just letting us see what the characters see when they see it; a static shot from the POV of the boys could have accomplished the same thing. The moving camera puts us into their psychological space. The space between the boys and the headmaster couldn't have been more than 15 feet, and thus shouldn't have taken as long as it seemed for them to get there. The dolly shot seemingly elongates the scene, underscoring the "walk of shame" that the boys are undergoing.

 

The effect of the dolly POV shot when Mabel approaches the boys is different. On the one hand, it is from her perspective, as we are seeing what she sees. Yet, from a psychological perspective, it mirrors the boys' perspective. The movement in the shot from the lower angle gives the effect of a predator hunting its prey, which is likely the way the boys felt as she approached.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

When the boys arrive in the headmasters office and approach him, we see the headmaster standing there leering at the boys. As we get closer, the viewer can imagine that the boys are in trouble just by the look they are getting. It's very dramatic.

 

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

The scene wouldn't be as horrifying if the viewer was a voyeur watching the events unfold. Hitchcock puts the viewer in the boys' shoes as they get closer and closer to the headmaster. It's vivid storytelling, we, the viewers are looking into the eyes of our accusers. We don't know what is to come, but we can tell it isn't good. The woman accuser and the headmaster are looking into our eyes, it's a clever technique.

 

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

Hitchock seems to use a man and woman relationship in his storytelling. In all three films there is tension between the sexes. Someone is getting hurt either mentally, like in The Ring and Pleasure Garden or physically as in The Lodger.

 

In the Ring, the boxer's wife is having an affair, in the Pleasure Garden, the rich man is desperate in meeting the chorus girl and then is laughed away, both of the characters are experiencing mental anguish. In the Lodger, the woman is murdered by as masked man. The witness is experiencing an emotional response but is also impacted physically as everyone rushed towards her and questions her.

 

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1. The POV tracking shot of the boys walking caused the viewer to feel their dread and anxiety of being called to the admin's office. We could see the admin through their eyes, and he looked pretty intense and upset.

2. The technique added feeling to the scene. H forced us into their position, and possibly, made us sympathize with at least one of the young men.

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

The most obvious connection I saw was the closeup of the woman, which mirrored The Lodger. The flashback reminded me of the dancing and piano playing in The Ring.

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I think the use of POV and other camera movements is just to demonstrate the situation of the shot and emphasize the feeling of the moment and then transfer it to the audience. It gives a rythem to the silent picture as like we're watching the motion in a harmony. The montage, camera movements, angles, framing and composition in general are meant to engage the viewer and the picture together which I truely liked even though I haven't watched the whole film. I cannot argue on technicals but that's what I said all I felt on emotions.

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  1. I first want to mention how much I applaud Hitchcock for including such an inventive shot in the scene. I feel that it evokes a sense of dread and builds suspense (especially without any sound), and the slow pace of the dolly also makes the walk from the door to the headmaster’s desk feel like a mile.

 

I think Hitchcock wanted the audience to feel a sense of panic, like they’re really a student that’s about to be scolded by the headmaster, on top of the emotions the shot gives off as I mentioned above.

 

I still haven’t had the chance to see all of the films (I plan to before the week is out), but between this scene and The Pleasure Garden I mostly notice how Hitchcock deals with the complexity of human relationships. In the span of only a few moments the characters make decisions that alter the rest of the films as well as the rest of their lives.

 

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The movement of the students in the headmaster's office is captured by tracking shot. We can study their faces as they approach. The pressure of the meeting increases as the students near the desk.

 

In the first view of the room, the headmaster appears small and distant, lost in a corner of the office. Though he's not moving much the tracking shot of him makes him grow larger in the frame. His seriousness, as shown by his face and carriage, becomes apparent, and likewise captures our notice.

 

The tracking camera is also used when the woman approaches the students, and her face grows larger on the screen. Suspense increases, because the time for her to move across the room is recorded by the moving camera. As the woman moves closer, we can see her effect on the faces of the students by the camera moving toward them (and showing us what she sees.) Finally, when she identifies the one who wronged her, her movement is abrupt, suggesting she's yielding a weapon.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 
 
The POV dolly shots always make me feel like I’m floating. Since my legs aren’t moving I feel like I’m floating towards the students and then we switch to the POV of the boys and it feels like the female is floating towards them/audience. A confrontation is going down and there’s nowhere to hide.
 
2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 
 
I think Hitchcock uses the shot to add some tension to the scene. The characters are initially standing on opposite sides of the room. When the female gets up and starts walking towards them, the POV feels like tunnel vision. We are 100% focused on these two students, but WHICH ONE is the culprit? We wait in suspense as the POV dolly continues to creep in, with no escape for the boy or for the audience until the reveal. 
 
3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.
 
Of course we have now seen the montage in the films. The montage while the female in Downhill remembers the night in question and the montage of Jack the boxer in The Ring where he’s thinking about his dame getting it on with the Champ.
 
The darkening/blackened edges in many of the shots in Downhill are similar to the opening scene of The Pleasure Garden where the edges are blackened. It really gives a sense of focus, like looking through a dark tunnel but the light on the other side lets us know we aren’t trapped, we just have to go through the tunnel to get to the other side. However, we don’t know exactly what might be waiting for us while we venture through that tunnel. So we have a sense of apprehension.
 
Finally, we have another close up shot on the female in Downhill similar to the opening sequence of The Lodger, close up of a screaming female. 
 
*Additional Reflections
 
  • "Actors should be treated like cattle." not "Actors are cattle." Thanks for the clarification Hitch! Still funny when you consider that he's being a tad facetious. I think in a sense he means that actors need to be led and told where to be etc. Not in a derogatory way and not even in a bad way. He even pointed out that he didn't believe in yelling on set as he would rather talk quietly with the actors about what the scene was and how he wanted it. Then it was up to them to act the part. That being said, I'd love to hear stories from actors on his sets.
     
  • I hadn't really thought about whether or not discussing an artists body of work should be or shouldn't be separated from their personal life. On one hand, I think there is something about focusing solely on the work from a critical standpoint, devoid of discussing personal aspects between the director and actors/actresses. On the other hand, that's a huge area of discussion, the private life of Hitch. There is time for gossip and discussion of these aspects but I like that we seem to be focused on the body of work here unless somehow his personal life has been put on screen for us to see. Then I'd be open to that discussion.
     
  • I loved how Hitch discussed his easy transition into film with sound. When he talked about not being redundant in a scene. If a character is smiling, he doesn't have to say that he's happy. We can see that! Hitch was great at showing us emotions and saying things that were in the heads of the characters. I like how he pointed out that not enough directors take advantage of the opportunity to show a female crying and then saying something like "I just thought of something funny." There's something powerful in mixing the emotion with what the character says that might not match their expression.
     
  • I initially thought that going through 40 films in a month would be daunting, but a couple things that Dr. Wes Gehring said in today's lecture. He mentioned that we are pretty much going to be binge-watching and it made me realize that in the age of binge-watching, many of us have been training for this moment!
     
  • Finally, I like the point Dr. Wes Gehring made about every viewing of a film is a new experience. I find that to be true with so many films I've seen. There's always something new to discover. A new camera angle, something new in the background or something that I don't remember seeing before. Additionally, I enjoy watching films I've seen in the past with closed captioning on. I've found that there are a lot of great dialogue in films that I didn't hear or catch upon earlier viewings and it just adds to the experience for me. 
 
 
 
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  1. I first want to mention how much I applaud Hitchcock for including such an inventive shot in the scene. I feel that it evokes a sense of dread and builds suspense (especially without any sound), and the slow pace of the dolly also makes the walk from the door to the headmaster’s desk feel like a mile.
  2. I think Hitchcock wanted the audience to feel a sense of panic, like they’re really a student that’s about to be scolded by the headmaster, on top of the emotions the shot gives off as I mentioned above.
  3. I still haven’t had the chance to see all of the films (I plan to before the week is out), but between this scene and The Pleasure Garden I mostly notice how Hitchcock deals with the complexity of human relationships. In the span of only a few moments the characters make decisions that alter the rest of the films as well as the rest of their lives.

 

Sense of dread and panic. Spot on.

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Not only does Hitch use what we would call a normal POV dolly, shot but he also experiments with a two shot POV. I don't recall seeing this in any other film. Most filmmakers would show the POV of the boys as just one view, not a two shot. Hitch experiments were designed to do something different from the norm, and this is one subtle way of telling the story a little differently.

 

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The effect of the dolly POV shot when the boys are approaching the headmaster is more than just letting us see what the characters see when they see it; a static shot from the POV of the boys could have accomplished the same thing. The moving camera puts us into their psychological space. The space between the boys and the headmaster couldn't have been more than 15 feet, and thus shouldn't have taken as long as it seemed for them to get there. The dolly shot seemingly elongates the scene, underscoring the "walk of shame" that the boys are undergoing.

 

The effect of the dolly POV shot when Mabel approaches the boys is different. On the one hand, it is from her perspective, as we are seeing what she sees. Yet, from a psychological perspective, it mirrors the boys' perspective. The movement in the shot from the lower angle gives the effect of a predator hunting its prey, which is likely the way the boys felt as she approached.

Great observation of a predator hunting its prey.

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Good call!  And not unlike "this-can't-be happening" feel when James Stewart is falling near the end of Rear Window and again when experiencing sickening symptoms of vertigo while climbing the church bell tower in Vertigo

This-can't-be-happening and there's no escaping it!

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1) In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

 

Judging by the scene, if feels as if I'm being lead to my doom. It's like being a dream, or in the case of the scene, a nightmare. I feel like I'm in the scene, and I start to have anxiety and fear because what I'm being pulled into is obviously a very bad confrontation, just like the two boys. I feel like a fly on the wall, against my will.

 

2) Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

 

Hitch wants the audience to be included in the action, or the drama of the scene. He wanted us to feel like we're being forced into the situation where there is no escape. The closer we get to the headmaster, the more our palms sweat, and the more prickly we feel. It adds terror and unease. We try to turn back, but the force is just way too strong. 

 

3) What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

 

Of course, there are montages; themes of guilt and torment, and unusual behavior. There is also a streak of femininity, in which both the main dancer girl and Mabel, are tough women with their own ideas. There are also juxtapositions of objects and faces which are used to convey psychological trauma. The tracking shot reminds me of a moment in Hitch's remake of his own "The Man Who Knew Too Much", where James Stewart's character is walking down this creepy alleyway to a sort of house I believe. I don't remember what happens, but it gave you the sense of being lured to an uncertain fate. I think all of Hitch's films skewer the human behavior and some reality to them, even when there is some suspension of disbelief.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


 


It's two things at once, they sort of contradict one another, and I'm positive that's intentional on the part of Hitchcock. On the one hand, I'm placed right there in the scene right away. That irritated headmaster isn't simply staring at a key character. He's staring at me in the shoes of that character. I'm instantly clear on what Roddy is feeling because I'm instinctively feeling it as well whether I want to or not -- uncertainty and that special brand of anxiety you only feel when you know you haven't done anything wrong and don't deserve to be in this position. Your life could fall apart because of what's happening through no real fault of your own.


 


On the other hand, I also feel a little... disembodied and uncomfortable, if those are the right words? I'm in Roddy's shoes, but I'm not the one in control of his feet. I'm moving closer to the headmaster's desk whether I want to or not. I'm not getting a choice, which adds to the feeling of discomfort that permeates everything about the whole scene. What's weird about that is it mimics the disembodied feeling you actually have in real life situations that are like that. Honestly, I had actual flashbacks of being sent to the principal's office when I was still a troubled kid just trying to get through high school in one piece. You're aware of opening his office door and sitting down for your talking-to, but it's almost as if you're watching someone else do it from inside that person's head.


 


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 


 


I think he uses it for all the reasons I mentioned in my above answer. It's a seriously effective way to engross the viewer in everything that's going on without being tedious or hitting them over the head with anything. It also leverages the way the human brain processes a visual like that to take away your feeling of control. I've noticed Hitchcock most often uses this shot when he wants to induce a feeling of dread, disorientation, or general unease and I see why. It's super effective.


 


As far as storytelling goes, POV tracking shots make it good and clear who you're supposed to be identifying with. It may or may not be someone you want to identify with, but that's almost beside the point. A Hitchcock film requires you to understand the head space of the main character and to truly "get" where he's coming from, whether or not that happens to be a good place 100% of the time. Otherwise, you can't truly appreciate the story that's being told.


 


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 


 


All four films seem to highlight what seems to be an inevitable conflict between men and women (both romantic and social). That presents itself in different ways and to varying intensities in each of the films we've looked at. In The Pleasure Garden, a dancer playfully strips a smitten show-goer of his illusions about her mystique (symbolized by the golden curl). In The Lodger, a man called "the Avenger" is literally killing young, blonde beauties for reasons that are apparently about getting back at a certain type of woman in general for... something. (Otherwise, why call himself the Avenger. Who is he avenging and why?) In Downhill, a young lady wrongfully accuses a young man of what I assume was a grievous offense in those days -- getting her pregnant -- for reasons I'm not totally sure of. In The Ring, the values and loyalty of a young vibrant wife are doubted (possibly with good reason) by her husband. All three films also deal with the different misconceptions people can have about one another. Wrongful accusation, appearances vs reality, and the power sex has to ruin lives or drive people to behave in irrational ways are all explored as well.


 


Common techniques include the delivery of lots of information quickly and succinctly via montages that are superimposed over the current scene to show they're actually one character's (possibly inaccurate) perception of events. There are also multiple devices used to put the viewer into the actual shoes of one or more of the characters as soon as possible (i.e. the mirror from The Ring, the binoculars from The Pleasure Garden, or the POV dolly shot from Downhill). Techniques like these make it clear we're not just being treated to a story. We're taking a journey into the human mind and preparing to explore concepts like motivation, perception, and drive as they relate to the story.


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Gppd 

 

 

1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

 

It's two things at once, they sort of contradict one another, and I'm positive that's intentional on the part of Hitchcock. On the one hand, I'm placed right there in the scene right away. That irritated headmaster isn't simply staring at a key character. He's staring at me in the shoes of that character. I'm instantly clear on what Roddy is feeling because I'm instinctively feeling it as well whether I want to or not -- uncertainty and that special brand of anxiety you only feel when you know you haven't done anything wrong and don't deserve to be in this position. Your life could fall apart because of what's happening through no real fault of your own.

 

On the other hand, I also feel a little... disembodied and uncomfortable, if those are the right words? I'm in Roddy's shoes, but I'm not the one in control of his feet. I'm moving closer to the headmaster's desk whether I want to or not. I'm not getting a choice, which adds to the feeling of discomfort that permeates everything about the whole scene. What's weird about that is it mimics the disembodied feeling you actually have in real life situations that are like that. Honestly, I had actual flashbacks of being sent to the principal's office when I was still a troubled kid just trying to get through high school in one piece. You're aware of opening his office door and sitting down for your talking-to, but it's almost as if you're watching someone else do it from inside that person's head.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

 

I think he uses it for all the reasons I mentioned in my above answer. It's a seriously effective way to engross the viewer in everything that's going on without being tedious or hitting them over the head with anything. It also leverages the way the human brain processes a visual like that to take away your feeling of control. I've noticed Hitchcock most often uses this shot when he wants to induce a feeling of dread, disorientation, or general unease and I see why. It's super effective.

 

As far as storytelling goes, POV tracking shots make it good and clear who you're supposed to be identifying with. It may or may not be someone you want to identify with, but that's almost beside the point. A Hitchcock film requires you to understand the head space of the main character and to truly "get" where he's coming from, whether or not that happens to be a good place 100% of the time. Otherwise, you can't truly appreciate the story that's being told.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

 

All four films seem to highlight what seems to be an inevitable conflict between men and women (both romantic and social). That presents itself in different ways and to varying intensities in each of the films we've looked at. In The Pleasure Garden, a dancer playfully strips a smitten show-goer of his illusions about her mystique (symbolized by the golden curl). In The Lodger, a man called "the Avenger" is literally killing young, blonde beauties for reasons that are apparently about getting back at a certain type of woman in general for... something. (Otherwise, why call himself the Avenger. Who is he avenging and why?) In Downhill, a young lady wrongfully accuses a young man of what I assume was a grievous offense in those days -- getting her pregnant -- for reasons I'm not totally sure of. In The Ring, the values and loyalty of a young vibrant wife are doubted (possibly with good reason) by her husband. All three films also deal with the different misconceptions people can have about one another. Wrongful accusation, appearances vs reality, and the power sex has to ruin lives or drive people to behave in irrational ways are all explored as well.

 

Common techniques include the delivery of lots of information quickly and succinctly via montages that are superimposed over the current scene to show they're actually one character's (possibly inaccurate) perception of events. There are also multiple devices used to put the viewer into the actual shoes of one or more of the characters as soon as possible (i.e. the mirror from The Ring, the binoculars from The Pleasure Garden, or the POV dolly shot from Downhill). Techniques like these make it clear we're not just being treated to a story. We're taking a journey into the human mind and preparing to explore concepts like motivation, perception, and drive as they relate to the sto

Good point about yet another innocent person being accused of something horrific. I also like how you pointed out the Headmaster was looking at their shoes. I missed that. Also, definitely a motif of pretty women in his films...and to me, they often seem at least subtly promiscuous. 

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Finally, I like the point Dr. Wes Gehring made about every viewing of a film is a new experience. I find that to be true with so many films I've seen. There's always something new to discover. A new camera angle, something new in the background or something that I don't remember seeing before. Additionally, I enjoy watching films I've seen in the past with closed captioning on. I've found that there are a lot of great dialogue in films that I didn't hear or catch upon earlier viewings and it just adds to the experience for me. 

 

This is the case for me as well. I've probably seen some of Hitchcock's films (i.e. VertigoPsycho, or The Birds) a good 20 or 30 times, but I never stop noticing new things. Sometimes it's something bigger, but little discoveries enhance the enjoyment of the film as well. As a creative person, I'm always especially appreciative of the little details because I realize some person at some point made a conscious decision to include each one. I love actively noticing what kind of art a character has on their walls, which book that is on the coffee table, what foods the person has in their fridge, etc.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene?

 

It made me feel more for the characters. Like I was walking in their shoes. It seemed like a long walk. I could feel the nervousness of the gentlemen being called to the head masters office unsure of why they were called.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?

 

I think it does add to the story by putting the audience into the action. We are not just spectators but active participants.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

 

Hitchcock again uses the montage to signify time. He is showing us a bit of backstory quickly. All the stories focused on women, but I'm not sure it's complementary. In this scene, we find a lady lying about who the father of her child is. She is obviously not married and pregnant. At the time, that was sort of scandalous. In the Ring, the boxer was afraid the lady was going to leave him for the Champ. That would be grounds for divorce also scandalous. I wonder if Hitchcock played it this way for the shock value.

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Oh my..... even with no score, no sound.... the POV dolly shot gives me chills.  You can slice the tension with a knife, and then that dolly zooms right into the actors' personal spaces....pushes the viewer right out of his/her comfort zone, for sure!  Hitchcock uses this strategy, quite honestly, because he's a genius and knew how to draw in the emotions of the audience.  What better way to do than then by drawing them right into the scene with the actors?  

 

Okay, now I'm going to go see what everyone else has written.  You all seem to write things out so eloquently!  

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1. The use of the POV dolly shot was very effective in establishing the mood of the characters in the scene. The look on the boys faces denotes the dread they feel of being called into the headmaster's office. They may not know why they were called into the office, but the look on the headmaster shows us and them that it is a serious matter. The walk toward the headmaster seems to take a long time as their fear and anxiety grows. The dolly shot of the girl is like a trapper going after her prey. Even before she approaches, she drops her purse which causes the one guy to look over at her as she bends over to  pick it up. She has the upper hand and as she approaches the two guys she is in control. She can choose either one as the accused. They are helpless and must wait to see which one of them she will catch in the trap she has set for them.

 

2. The use of the the POV tracking shot puts the viewer in the character's shoes. We see what they see and the action is focused on just what their view is. It conveys the suspense that is built up as the characters and us the viewer wait to see the outcome. Especially since this was a silent film the technique helps tell the story without the need for words. And watching it with no sound you have to rely on what you are seeing to tell the story instead of words or dramatic music.

 

3.In all the clips we have seen so far the theme is the relationships between men and women.

In The Pleasure Garden, The Ring and Downhill there are scenes of dancing. The Ring and Downhill both have a shot of a record player. In The Lodger and Downhill we have the close up of a women's face. In all the movies the eyes are used to express emotions. The leering men and the flirty dancers in The Pleasure Garden, the anxious boxer in The Ring, the victim and the witness in The Lodger and the accused men and their accuser in Downhill. The use of eyes to express emotion will continue to be used in later films even when sound is used. The theme of voyeurism is always present. The men watching the dancers in The Pleasure Garden, the crowds watching the victim's body and the witness telling what she saw in The Lodger, the boxer watching his wife in The Ring and the girl watching the two men walking towards the headmaster in Downhill. This theme will continue in later films such as Rear Window and Psycho.

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Daily Dose #4: Downhill

1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 
I think it was so smart to replace the music in the scene with the effect of the POV dolly shots. It really adds the drama to the scene and makes me feel the tension in the scene without there being any dialogue or music.

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?
It adds a lot to the visual storytelling because the POV technique is what is used to convey a lot of different emotions in the scene. It is able to create mood without using any sound, which for a silent film is extremely crucial. Not many filmmakers are able to use this technique in our current era of cinema - and if more did, I think we'd have a lot more quality films. 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.
All of the films include montage which helps express the theme throughout the films. As well as the use of superimposition which was shown in The Ring and The Lodger. A lot of these techniques are also used in future Hitchcock films. 

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1. The POV tracking shot of the boys walking caused the viewer to feel their dread and anxiety of being called to the admin's office. We could see the admin through their eyes, and he looked pretty intense and upset.

2. The technique added feeling to the scene. H forced us into their position, and possibly, made us sympathize with at least one of the young men.

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

The most obvious connection I saw was the closeup of the woman, which mirrored The Lodger. The flashback reminded me of the dancing and piano playing in The Ring.

I like the thought you gave about Hitchcock forcing us into the character's position. That is how I feel when watching any of his films and I think it's important in filmmaking to make your audience feel that way. 

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

 

The POV dolly/tracking shots gave the viewer a deeper understanding of what the characters were feeling in the scene. Whether that be the look on Wakely's face, or that of the woman doing the accusing, we could sense the tension and feeling each character was portraying in a deeper fashion.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?

 

I think Hitchcock uses the technique of the POV tracking shot to further display the feeling in a scene. Especially in his silent pictures, the POV tracking shot displays more emotion, drama, and overall theme to each scene.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

 

There are several connections in each of the films we have studied thus far. The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger, and Downhill (and many more of his later works) focus on a women in need of some sort of saving, being done wrong in some sense. The scene from The Pleasure Garden that sticks out most to me when reflecting on this discussion was when the woman was robbed of her money and couldn't afford the train ticket. Here again in Downhill, we see a woman who is in a vulnerable situation (whether it be an honest one or not). We also see visual technique connections, like the POV shots to portray more emotion and further tell each characters individual story, just to name a few connections throughout his films.  

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1. Hitchcock’s “point of view” dolly sequences in “Downhill” (1927) would give the audience a more dramatic and suspenseful feeling instead of the regular “static” shot, when the two students were in the headmaster’s office.

2. He wanted to use the “point of view” tracking technique to showcase emotion from the viewpoints of the woman and the two male students in a dramatic form, along with the use of flashbacks near the conclusion of the scene (in a suspenseful/eerie manner).  This would serve as an enhancement to the story.

3. One  connection in “Downhill” (1927) would be the scene from “The Ring” (with superimposed footage of the dance party sequence, which is similar to the superimposed footage at the conclusion of “Downhill.”).  Other connections between “Downhill” and Hitchcock’s other silent include the opening scene to “The Lodger” (a  close-up shot of the woman in distress after the murder in “The Lodger,” along with a close-up of the woman telling the details to the two students and the headmaster, with superimposed footage in “Downhill”).  

 

 

 

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The dolly sequence from the boys' point of view might seem like a realist pov, positioning the camera where their eyes would be, but it's really expressionism. The camera is focused in a way that human eyes cannot not, with no peripheral vision. Our anxious brain, however, can make us think we are seeing in such tunnel vision. The dolly sequence captured that phenomenon nicely. The one later from the girl's point of view felt more like trying to maintain the mystery of who she would choose for the viewer rather than an attempt to get inside her head with camera work.

 

The montage scene in which she relays her version of what happened is also worthy of note. Hitchcock mentioned in one of the previous interview clips that montages were for elements of the story that did not merit dramatization, like the boxer's rise to the title fight in The Ring. In this Downhill sequence, though, Hitchcock superimposes the montage, the story elements not worthy of dramatization, over the real drama of the scene, the girls eyes with all of their anger and deviousness as she spins her tale. That's brilliant! The montage not only serves to relay information, but it's multi-purposed to show the girl's emotion at the same time. 

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

       

        The POV shots emphasis the feeling of the young man as his accuser closes in "for the kill", a feeling of being trapped or cornered. 

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

 

     It visualizes the tight closed in feeling to emulate being "trapped"; now way out for the boy.
 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

 

​      The tight close up of the angry woman accuser in this clip is similar to the blonde dancer in The Pleasure Garden, who glares at her

       leering audience, or the tight shots of the man and wife in The RIng, while they imagine what the other is thinking/doing. There are

​       also the close up in The Lodger, of the women attacked, all these are used to signify heightened emotional states.

 

      The overlaying montage of the record player,  dancers moving behind the stringed doorway, money exchanging hands, etc.in

       today's  clip is similar again to the "revelry" montage sequence in The Ring. But they convey different meanings in each clip. In

      The Ring, the clip shows the chaotic party events multiplied be the fighters minds-eye view of event transpiring. In today's clip the 

      montage is used to condense past events, the woman claims happened, to quickly show her story's encounter.

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