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Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #4: Depends on Your Point of View (Scene from Downhill)

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1) i think it is another level of movie going, you become the person, you move about the room as them, if you open yourself to it, you take on their plight, instead of being a third party observer, watching others preform. the closeups add to that feeling as well, as i mentioned in a previous post, the size of the actor (zoomed in on their face) makes it feel like you're there, carrying on the conversation with the actor, it's no longer a flat stage play that you're observing from afar, you're part of the story.

 

2) i pretty much covered this in my first answer, but the technique allows you to be more than an audience member, you become part of the cast, experiencing what the characters are seeing and doing, for yourself. 3d movies try to accomplish this, but they really are just a visual effect to enhance the depth of the screen experience. these shots go far beyond that and emotionally pull you into the story and give you the feeling you're there, not just watching it from your seat.

 

3) the close ups, and the brief montage towards the end, and perhaps the overall tone (mood) of the scene, it is comparable to some of the other films, it's a school, but we'll still feel the foreboding nature of the scene, bad stuff is happening, and we get to experience the dread as well. there's a darkness to the situation (especially for the time), and we get to feel it too, it all adds to the success of not only seeing it, but including us in the uncomfortable story, something we might not otherwise get to do in our regular lives.

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If you subscribe to FILMSTRUCK, there are excellent restored versions of The Lodger and Downhill there.  With both films I had to keep reminding myself to only judge them within the context of the times they were made and to curb my innate bias away from silent melodramatic pieces.  I had to keep reminding myself to stick with it even though my 2017 short attention span wanted to hit return and move on to something else.  I was rewarded for my efforts by having seen Hitchcock (who’s work I hold dear) in his infancy, when he was young, brash, and experimenting with everything. 

1.    In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

a.    At the head of each tracking shot the boys are in a medium shot and they appear a bit perplexed, but hiding something.  The headmaster is first picked up in a semi long shot surrounded by a cavernous set he is almost statue/god like in his bearing.  As the camera dollies in his presence looms over the boys daring them to tell the truth and in their dolly shot they become even more disturbed.  Then as they shot brings the girl in the background into view Hitchcock has her drop her purse causing the boys to notice her presence.  We don’t need an intertitle to tell us that they know what the matter truly is.  As the camera moves in on the Headmaster he becomes even sterner and judgmental of the boys.  She’s pregnant, one of these boys is responsible and he’s going to find out which.  Hitchcock did this all with the simple dolly effect.

2.    Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

a.    Hitchcock could have been very conventional and traditional using a master, medium closeup scheme.  Then shot reverse shot, but it would not have told the story so effectively as the tracking shot he did use.  Hitchcock was oft quoted and noted to storyboard the entire film before he ever shot a frame of film.  Then he would come up with visual tricks and effects while shooting just to keep himself from becoming bored with it.  I’m sure he storyboarded this whole sequence out in pre-production and then on set played with it and the actors to liven everything up and all to tell his story better.  

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Q... Downhill 1927 ...opening scene:  Tracking shot...That would be awful to be called  into the headmaster's office & we the audience can feel the boys discomfort w/the tracking shot looming over the entire scene.  I did not really get it at first that Mabel (Annette Benson) was (w/child) but at the end of the clip she mentions money & how Roddy (Ivor Novello) has rich parents..she is saying a lie to extort money when it seems Tim (Roddy Irvine) is really the guilty one...music, dancing & then...

 

Looks like Mabel gets a bit roughed up in this scene ...she is grabbed b/c he is accused & angry w/her & she departs the scene escorted by the headmaster & throws back a defiant look

 

I will  confine my comments to this opening scene & not step out of it for now ...one reason is b/c I have yet to watch this movie ...Downhill 1927

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The POV shots increase the tension of the scene and between the characters. Hitchcock's use of a record playing and dancing seems to hint at decadence and wild living resulting in a fall from society. I appreciate the repeated symbolism of the main character continually falling in society - first the stairs to the Underground then the long downward ride in the elevator after he breaks with his high maintenance wife

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I love actively noticing what kind of art a character has on their walls, which book that is on the coffee table, what foods the person has in their fridge, etc.

Which can raise even more questions when watching filmmakers like Kubrick: I.e. Why Jack Nicholson is reading Playgirl magazine waiting in the lobby at the Overlook Hotel...

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Hitchcock’s utilization of the POV tracking shot quickly builds an anticipatory feel. In much more concise phrasing, I'll term this feel as “impending doom.” Students summoned to the headmaster's​ office typically doesn't result in friendly chatter. Hitchcock’s approach with the tracking shot expressively reveals the boys’ innermost thoughts/feelings. We see the intensity on their faces, but a very grand yet subtle addition exhibiting their sense of unease is simply the camera’s steady and slow movement. The boys seem to creep forward, nearly as though they are taking a rather lengthy amount of time to walk across the room.

 

Another POV tracking shot used involves the waitress upon her approaching the boys. This too creates anticipation, as we readily await the waitress's big reveal. Hitchcock frames her in away similar to the two school boys, as there is a type of back and forth (to and from) in between the three altogether. The tracking shot concludes displaying the back of the boys’ heads with the waitress facing the camera as she is situated in front of them. However, she is purposely standing as though she's​ in between them, not favoring either. This shot exhibits how the reveal (accusation) could swing to either boy.

 

Hitchcock likely used the POV tracking shot to heighten the anticipation for the audience by placing them directly in the characters’ position(s). It's the utmost direct effect giving a sense of walking in the shoes of the actors on screen. Hitchcock famously said, “there is no terror in the bang, only in the anticipation of it.” And what better way to craft anticipation other than to drop an audience into the position of the characters?

 

Downhill and The Pleasure Garden both employ a shot reverse shot technique. Downhill uses this technique when the accused boy laughs at the waitress's claims. He glances toward the headmaster who wears a stern expression and the boy seems to recoil into himself now understanding the severity of the accusation. The Pleasure Garden’s use of such technique is a stark contrast of events. Here, Hitchcock’s shot reverse shot reveals an atmosphere of delight. A male audience member wears a look of pleasure on his face as he watches a particular woman perform on stage.

 

Downhill also makes use of montage reminiscent of The Ring’s German Expressionism montage. Downhill shows the waitress’s reveal of the rendezvous, her face filling the frame, as new images fade in and out upon her telling of the story. This kind of technique is a reveal of what's flying through a character’s mind. The Ring's montage consists of the fighter’s wife kissing the champion, elongated guests morphing into the stretched piano keys and hands strumming other musical instruments. This clearly shows a stressed mental state.

 

Lastly, Hitchcock filled the frame with the faces of both the waitress in Downhill and the frightened woman in The Lodger. These tight shots lead to a rather German Expressionism type of storytelling, (a reveal of a rendezvous and a contorted look of fright.) Nonetheless, Hitchcock was stamping a visionary signature onto his works in the very early stages of his filmmaking career.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

As part of the audience, I felt invested in the character(s) and his/her all important plot change. It seems the young men had a narrow shot of having to walk across a long room in order to hear why they were being asked to the Dean's office. I am not sure if they were aware of the young woman sitting behind them at first.  We also know from the POV dolly shot that the dean could have seen the young woman looking "put off" and wronged upon the appearance of the young men.  The tracking shows that Roddy senses this is going to be a problematic situation as he stares at the dean.  From the young mens' POV Mabel looks mad and ready to give an accusation. All of the young people see the distance closing in on them and we can sense that as the audience.

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

This holds the audience to the sequence of events as the plot develops. As an audience member it is interesting to be in with the characters in a crisis situation and to see how the characters are reacting to one another. The camera is our eye as we look for hints of deception, judgment, and betrayal in others.

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

The Pleasure Garden has various types of anxiety with numerous characters and shared motives. Whereas, Downhill is a private scene with four people with various motives. The Ring has both components of group (mob-like) anxiety but also a private scene in another room with various character motives.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


The POV dolly shots bring me into the emotion and drama of the film.  I feel closer to the action and to the feelings of each performer.  


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 


The POV tracking shot helps to move the viewer into the story itself feeling the drama and tension experienced by the characters and the situation.  There is also a clear visual contrast between a steady shot showing characters standing and talking or close ups showing facial expressions and movements.  


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 


The similarities I noticed with this film and previous films are uses of the close up (expressions, eye movements), shots that bring you closer to the action, longer lingering shots on individuals (especially similar to The Ring), montage (record player music montage in The Ring especially giving the viewer a window into a character's mind)

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1)  For me, the POV shots help me feel the dread Roddy and Tim have making the walk into the Dean's office and well as feeling like I'm actually making the walk with them.

 

2)  The POV shots definitely give you the feel of the scene and work very well in lieu of dialogue not to mention the fact that we are feeling exactly what Hitchcock wanted us to feel and in a way we are "being treated like cattle." 

 

3)  The montage is used in both Downhill and The Ring, but we also see close ups in all of the films and we are definitely beginning to see a theme about the interactions between the sexes.  The odd, and sometimes inappropriate, use of humor continues to be theme as well (for those of you that have seen all of the movies in their entirety).  I specifically like the nose picker in The Ring. 

 

I also think that there is a similarity in the blacked out sides of the staircase in the Pleasure Garden and the dark rings in the POV shots.  We are being shown exactly what we need to see, nothing more, nothing less, the POV just adds the movement which helps us feel like we are moving with the characters. 

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Hitchcock’s utilization of the POV tracking shot quickly builds an anticipatory feel. In much more concise phrasing, I'll term this feel as “impending doom.” Students summoned to the headmaster's​ office typically doesn't result in friendly chatter. Hitchcock’s approach with the tracking shot expressively reveals the boys’ innermost thoughts/feelings. We see the intensity on their faces, but a very grand yet subtle addition exhibiting their sense of unease is simply the camera’s steady and slow movement. The boys seem to creep forward, nearly as though they are taking a rather lengthy amount of time to walk across the room.

 

Another POV tracking shot used involves the waitress upon her approaching the boys. This too creates anticipation, as we readily await the waitress's big reveal. Hitchcock frames her in away similar to the two school boys, as there is a type of back and forth (to and from) in between the three altogether. The tracking shot concludes displaying the back of the boys’ heads with the waitress facing the camera as she is situated in front of them. However, she is purposely standing as though she's​ in between them, not favoring either. This shot exhibits how the reveal (accusation) could swing to either boy.

 

Hitchcock likely used the POV tracking shot to heighten the anticipation for the audience by placing them directly in the characters’ position(s). It's the utmost direct effect giving a sense of walking in the shoes of the actors on screen. Hitchcock famously said, “there is no terror in the bang, only in the anticipation of it.” And what better way to craft anticipation other than to drop an audience into the position of the characters?

 

Downhill and The Pleasure Garden both employ a shot reverse shot technique. Downhill uses this technique when the accused boy laughs at the waitress's claims. He glances toward the headmaster who wears a stern expression and the boy seems to recoil into himself now understanding the severity of the accusation. The Pleasure Garden’s use of such technique is a stark contrast of events. Here, Hitchcock’s shot reverse shot reveals an atmosphere of delight. A male audience member wears a look of pleasure on his face as he watches a particular woman perform on stage.

 

Downhill also makes use of montage reminiscent of The Ring’s German Expressionism montage. Downhill shows the waitress’s reveal of the rendezvous, her face filling the frame, as new images fade in and out upon her telling of the story. This kind of technique is a reveal of what's flying through a character’s mind. The Ring's montage consists of the fighter’s wife kissing the champion, elongated guests morphing into the stretched piano keys and hands strumming other musical instruments. This clearly shows a stressed mental state.

 

Lastly, Hitchcock filled the frame with the faces of both the waitress in Downhill and the frightened woman in The Lodger. These tight shots lead to a rather German Expressionism type of storytelling, (a reveal of a rendezvous and a contorted look of fright.) Nonetheless, Hitchcock was stamping a visionary signature onto his works in the very early stages of his filmmaking career.

I love the phrase "impending doom." That's exactly how this POV makes me feel, I just couldn't find the right language! Thank you!

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I love the phrase "impending doom." That's exactly how this POV makes me feel, I just couldn't find the right language! Thank you!

Absolutely! Glad my phrasing helped you out a bit :)

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I love the way Hitchcock uses the subjective point of view as if we are the camera.  I can feel the suspense building more this way rather than a wide angle shot of everything going on in the room.  I can see patterns in this movie such as the expressions on the actors and actresses are maximized by the zooming in - you can see the panic on the young mens' faces.  Although there wasn't sound in this it didn't need it because you can imagine being right there in the room.  You can see how Hitchcock was influenced by the German expressionism because there is a collection of images when the girl tells her story.  He uses this montage method in many of his movies to maybe add to the build up of emotions  - seeing everything going by in a fast pace - it makes one feel rather anxious.  You can see the patterns of using close up shots and different point of views in The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger and The Ring.  The audience feels empathy for the characters because we are put in the character's place.     

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This is a very dark and foreboding clip. Roddy seems to have a look of sheer defeat and terror on his face, as Mabel, with her extremely angry eyes, spins her sordid tale.

I believe Mabel is actually doing this to try and extort money from Roddy's rich father. Although, the friend Tim looks like he may be the guilty one.

 

The POV shots add so much to the tension of the scene. You get into the character 's raw emotions, and you are actually part of the story, feeling sympathetic to their plight. We as the audience get to experience. their dread. 

 

The montage scene near the end of the clip pulls us in to the story as well and we get to see Mabel's subjective viewpoint.

 Downhill reminds me of two of Hitch's later films: Rope and Vertigo with  so much tension and instability.

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1.  As the two boys are walking you start to feel this dread and anxiety as they get closer to the headmaster.  You feel as if it is you getting in trouble for some unknown reason.

 

2.  I believe he uses POV tracking for the purpose of adding you to the film.  He doesn't just want you to see a movie he wants you to feel the emotions that the characters are feeling.  He wants you as the viewer to be part of the experience.  

 

3.  The techniques that i picked up on for example when he wants you to focus on a particular part he blacks out the background.  Also he uses montage to be able to show what the character is thinking and reminiscing about without being able to speak.

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The effect of dolly shots pulls us into the character's head and bolsters the emotional impact we feel for our new found set of eyes. Hitchcock cleverly uses Montage to jostle our POV to the next character, such as in DOWNHILL; switching us from Roddy to Maggie's vantage point.

Using the visual technique of a massive closeup on the actor's expression rallies emotional impact, used in RING and DOWNHILL. The over-sized sets convey images of a palace and the actors are swimming in luxury and the audience is invited to their world. Hitch uses this in PLEASURE GARDEN in the party scene and in DOWNHILL'S interrogation scene. The motifs of underclass and upperclass seep through with the LODGER in Hitch's portrayal of a clobbering mob, used also in 39 STEPS' bar scene, later. The theme of the wrongly accused pops up in LODGER, NORTH BY NORTHWEST (later) and DOWNHILL.

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 In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


The tracking and POV shots put me in the room with the characters. When the POV is from the men walking, it denotes a bit of dread at what's to come. But the POV from the headmaster emphasizes their fear of why they're being called into his office.


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 


It allows the audience to be a part of the storytelling rather than just sitting there and watching the story unfold.


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 


The use of montage editing to give insight into more details of the story. In Downhill, montage editing was used as a flashback as Mabel was explaining her backstory (and the reason she's wanting money now). The theme of the innocent man against a conniving female seems to be a common theme.  However, that's not to say that the woman is always conniving - she just may be appearing that way for the sake of the story.


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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

 

 

​It adds a build up of suspense.

 

 

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

 

​Its a great way to build up tension especially with out having dialogue.

 

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

 

I see a little of the similar images used to make points clear and show what someone is thinking or feeling without having to show written dialoge.  

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This scene contrasts significantly with the others we have spotlighted so far, mainly because of the stillness of the actors and the achievement of intensity through close-ups and a moving camera rather than through fast-paced editing and dizzying effects. The use of the moving POV shots allows surmise to grow, allows us to put the pieces together of what's coming and why along with Novello's main character. It's interesting, too, the way in which the boys move freely into the lavishly appointed room, while the waitress first waits seated in a corner and then comes in again only barely, staying against the wall. They move through a space to which they are accustomed, which is going to betray Novello, while she knows she doesn't really belong and is visually treated in just that way. Her acting, by the way--the somewhat twitchy, eye-darting quality of her false accusation--is really well-done.

 

Those dolly POV shots create rising tension, rising dread--a kind of ominous inevitability.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene?  The POV dolly shots puts the viewer right into the room with the actors and not passively watching the whole screen.  This truly creates more of a intensity with the scenes.  I am an active viewer verses a passive viewer.  My emotions were growing stronger in I was not liking the woman for her obvious lies (downward cast eyes) and not liking the men either for being such weaklings and just taking it all passively.

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?   Without words he is seeking another way to build the story for the viewer and not have us be lazy waiting for the word screen.  We are creating the story along with the scenes and actually, do not need the words or music for that matter.  It is brilliant and totally changes the way Silent Film was in that period.

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.  The visual techniques by the actors seem more enhanced; more make-up, more facial gestures and, more dramatic waiting periods.  The image of the big Ivy League type doors at the beginning make you feel like you are falling into the scene, especially when you have the HUGE gap between the door and the desk of the Headmaster.  The eyes of the Headmaster are quite Bella Lugosi-like as well.  What was off a bit was the way the boys dressed if the one accused truly had a rich father to support the pregnant waitress, then why were they dressed so poorly?  Body language was big in this scene with the calm, but father-like Headmaster, the over stressed drama Queen and the boys that has drooped shoulders, downcast eyes and seemed to have more deep feelings for each other that to imagine that were interested in women.  This seems like a true film of misogynistic work as the college boys seem weak and feminine and the female is loud, reactionary and bold.

 

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? The POV shots don't just show you a point of view, they make you feel the point of view. When the boys approach the head master, you feel the dread of their slow walk, as if you are about to be in a lot of trouble with them.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? He uses the POV to enable the viewer to actually experience what is happening, rather than just watch what is happening.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. He uses close ups to convey feelings and authority or lack thereof.

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What struck me at first was the extreme long shot of the headmaster at his desk from the boys' point of view. The room isn't that big! But the shot sets the intimidating tone immediately.

When you see a long shot like that, it's normally to indicate isolation, a feeling of being "small," but in this case, it has the opposite effect, an imposing quality. Brilliant.

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Watching the opening scene of Downhill from the point of view of the two boys gave me the same feeling that they felt of walking into a troubling situation.

We also see the same techinque used in this film of images over images like the face of the girl telling what happened over the images showing us what happened between her and one of the boys like Hitchcock used in yesterday's daily dose of The Ring.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene?

 ---The POV tracking shot of the boys walking toward the headmaster's desk felt like they were doomed men walking the plank; there was no way out of this punishment.  The second POV tracking shot of the girl walking toward them gave me a sense that the boys were trapped by this situation.  As the camera moves toward them, they are feeling the weight of this trouble; it presses in on them and keeps them without a way out. 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?

​ ---The POV tracking shot adds to the feeling of subjectivity that we have seen and discussed previously.  By allowing us to see the world through the eyes of his characters, Hitchcock makes it easy for us a viewers to identify with the characters and their conflicts.  The shots make the visuals feel dynamic in an otherwise static situation.  The office set is unchanging and imposing, so when it is coupled with the moving camera, the story doesn't remain stuck in place.  How much less tension would be present if this scene had been shot without the moving camera?

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

​ --- Initially I noticed the superimposing of the ghostly images over another, especially the spinning record player like in The Ring​.  Also the use of visuals to give a great deal of expository information (the girl's account of the night she got pregnant) without any spoken dialogue reminded me of the news ticker from ​The Lodger​.  The boys' situation reminds me of The Pleasure Garden​--they are trapped by a person with dark motives, just like the young lady whose letter was stolen in the earlier film.

 

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1.  The effect of watching the tracking shots was to put me in the protagonist's place.  I felt like I was moving inexorably to a predetermined conclusion, with no way out.  I was filled with a sense of dread and foreboding.  

 

2.  Hitchcock always loved the subjective camera, putting the viewer in the place of the character on the screen.  Making the camera move, instead of keeping it static is just a way of heightening the effect of walking in the character's shoes, so to speak.

 

3.  Thinking of these 4 movies chronologically, I don't see a lot of connecting themes.  From a technical aspect, there is a use of subjective camera shots, and also a very sure editorial technique that always keeps the viewer in the story.  The methods that Hitchcock employed to create the POV technique improved as he progressed as a filmmaker.  You can see his growth and experimentation just in this brief time period.  

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1. The POV shots of the boys walking into the office and of the headmaster and the girl create the feeling of going downhill, of lives tumbling down and crashing.

2. The POVs and the closeups heighten the tensions, suspense, drama and tragedy of the scene.

3. The montages, superimposition of images and scenes, and the creative use of editing in these films discussed so far show the growing development, sophistication and maturity of Hitchcock as a filmmaker and storyteller.

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