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That's what it looked like to me (quite risque)...  or ... he was paying her to keep quiet about their "dealings"... or... he was paying her to help with her "trouble" after the fact. Eit her way, apparently she didn't think the amount of money she got was enough.

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Now that I've seen the whole film, I am seeing early themes, Hitchcock explores in so many films.  I also am beginning to see his use of tracking POV shots and now have more understanding.  I also love how he used yellow, blue and black and white to convey not only symbolism, mood and emotion.

I am grateful to part of this class.

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No, he was a Gigolo, women paid him for companionship and sex, but the sunlight showed her true age as well as the true condition of his life.  In the flashback, he realized just how he had been used and how he had used others.  I don't think he had sex with the last lady but he did have sex with some of them.  He also had to deal with a hard-hearted Madam or Pimp, whichever way you choose to see the old, bossy hag.

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Daily Dose #4

 

POV Downhill and tracking shots

 

Listening to Professor Edwards and Professor Gehring discuss the development of the tracking shot and Hitchcock’s first use of it in Downhill brought to mind a movie I just watched the other night, Youth, and a line that caught my attention in it. Harvey Keitel says to a young woman, while looking in a spotting scope over a Swiss alpine valley, "This is what you see when you're young. Everything seems really close. That's the future. And now,” he has her look through the opposite end, “That's what you see when you're old. Everything seems really far away. That's the past." Similarly, in this clip, the tracking/dolly shot serves to set up a meeting that telescopes the future of the main character. It’s going to zoom in on the crisis he’s about to face, accompanied by the close-up of the young woman accuser, with her malice and spite, and the nervous twitiching hand, surprise, and backing away of his guilty friend, and a foreshadowing of the grim play-out of his young life that is about to follow. I think the dolly-shot is part of the dream/nightmare effect I have experienced in watching the best of Hitchcock, even in my earliest exposure to glimpses of his films, that create a feeling of vertigo, and déjà vu, that have made me sit up and take notice of him.

 

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I felt fear, anxiety, and a sense of panic - being zeroed in as the dolly camera drew closer to the actors - almost like being singled out. Aside from the actor Ivor-- the overlap / Double Exposure type of filming - used as a flashback or a dream sequence - gay, happy, Carefree. Rules were loose or just followed along the border of reality.

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I had some trouble interpreting in answering these questions

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