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I have a question about the lecture notes from the last module of Week One.  One of the elements of suspense as pointed out in the notes is locale - being topical and relevant.  I'm a little confused about this.

Hitchcock isn't necessarily the screenwriter, who is the most likely person to have chosen the locale.  Am I wrong?  The screenwriter would have been the person to have written 'the man and woman are  climbing about Mt. Rushmore'.  'The hero and villain are at the top of the Statue of Liberty'.

Isn't all of this hard-coded into a script presented to the director?

I guess what I am really asking is how these particular locales (Mt. Rushmore, Statue of Liberty) are specifically relevant to the plot of the movie?

Am I over-thinking this?   Even by watching the interview with Hitchcock, I am still not clear.   Would love if someone could break this down for me.

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It is well-known that Hitch liked famous locales. But you certainly raise a good point.  Did he have more input than we realized on the screenplays?  Were the writers completely aware that this was something that Hitchcock sought?

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Did he have more input than we realized on the screenplays?  Were the writers completely aware that this was something that Hitchcock sought?

Hitchcock collaborated extensively with his screenwriters. There would be many story conferences. Hitch was definitely involved with the structure of the story, the events of the narrative. Other writers also contributed to building this structure, but the primary thing he needed them for was dialogue. 

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Yes, that does familiar from what I've read of Hitchcock.

 

And yet he never took any screenplay credit past the very early days of his British sound period.  I wonder why he made that choice.   

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Hitchcock collaborated extensively with his screenwriters. There would be many story conferences. Hitch was definitely involved with the structure of the story, the events of the narrative. Other writers also contributed to building this structure, but the primary thing he needed them for was dialogue. 

 

Thanks!   That makes total sense.

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