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Are there really that many 4th of July pictures?


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   I'm well aware there are several motion pictures that either celebrate & or have something to do with (THE 4th of JULY)

 

Most notably of course is>

 

1942' tremendous "Yankee Doodle Dandy" (Warner Bros.)

1972's "1776"-(unfortunately some genius got the idea when we were only about age 10 or so to take us to see this musical as a "Field Day thing?"  Many were snoring throughout. It may be well-made, but us kids were too young to appreciate uit & for me I was yet to become a bona-fide moviebuff-(l979)

& all I then cared about in the movies was "The King of Movie Cool: Steve McQueen"-(l930-l980)

 

"Drums Along the Mohawk" (l939) is obviously another

"The Patriot" (2000) ($113m.) (***)

"Born on the 4th of July" (l989) ($81m.) (***1/2)-(deservedly won *O. Stone his 2nd BD *Oscar)

 

& I'm certain I've neglected to list many, so please do? :huh:

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I'd pay somebody at TCM real money if they would STOP PLAYING "1776" for just one July 4th.  Really not a fan of that movie though there are some good actors in it.  How about the "Un-4th" featuring movies that have nothing to do with the founding of the country just for a change of pace??? OK, rant over.

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Interesting topic.  Any that I can think  of were already mentioned.

 

I might question "Yankee Doodle Dandy"  because it really isn't about the fourth.  Sure, the big song does have George M. Cohen singing, "I'm a real live nephew of my Uncle Sam, born on the fourth of July..."  When actually, Cohen was born on the THIRD.

 

A few others, ranging from older to more recent are:

 

THE SCARLET COAT ('55)

JOHNNY TREMAIN ('57), a Disney production

THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE ('59)

THE CROSSING ('03)

 

Any others I'm not aware of.  Too bad.  This all too important story deserves a first class thoroughly examined historical film presentation.  NOT a typical big money production packed with big-name "stars", half of which would probably just "phone it in".

 

 

Sepiatone

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Not your average 4th of July movie but it's plot has our victory over the aliens on the date.

 

"Independence Day" (1996) - the title speaks for itself.

 

The president 4th of July speech.

 

 

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Not your average 4th of July movie but it's plot has our victory over the aliens on the date.

 

"Independence Day" (1996) - the title speaks for itself.

 

The president 4th of July speech.

 

 

 

And this same sort of speech as it would be done today...

 

"Oh, this is bad...very bad. Aliens invading our wonderful country. This is why I kept pushing for that wall. What's that you say? Different kind of aliens? Never mind then. And may God Bless America!"

 

(...yeah, yeah, I know...MUCH too easy, huh...sorry)

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TCM got a plug from my local paper;   On the front page was a 'things to do on the 4th other than watch fireworks' and one of the items was a picture of Preston and Jones from The Music Man with 'see the Music Man on TCM' written under the picture.

 

 

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   I neglected toi include a couple others already did & one that instantly gained cinematic infamy in 1985's hugely expensive Revolutionary War epic w/*Al Pacino-(in what he calls his first career, his 2nd started in '89 w/"Sea of Grass" & then of course "Dick Tracy" (l990-9s. actor nod.)

 

It is Hugh Hudson's awful mess of an epic "Revolution" (*)

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And this same sort of speech as it would be done today...

 

"Oh, this is bad...very bad. Aliens invading our wonderful country. This is why I kept pushing for that wall. What's that you say? Different kind of aliens? Never mind then. And may God Bless America!"

 

(...yeah, yeah, I know...MUCH too easy, huh...sorry)

 

Obviously 1 I also 4-got         Good goin pal  I'll always recall when the scene of "the White House" being blown up the audience cheered  it's obvious it won Best Visual effects that year over "Twister" for that sequence alone

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Interesting topic.  Any that I can think  of were already mentioned.

 

I might question "Yankee Doodle Dandy"  because it really isn't about the fourth.  Sure, the big song does have George M. Cohen singing, "I'm a real live nephew of my Uncle Sam, born on the fourth of July..."  When actually, Cohen was born on the THIRD.

 

A few others, ranging from older to more recent are:

 

THE SCARLET COAT ('55)

JOHNNY TREMAIN ('57), a Disney production

THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE ('59)

THE CROSSING ('03)

 

Any others I'm not aware of.  Too bad.  This all too important story deserves a first class thoroughly examined historical film presentation.  NOT a typical big money production packed with big-name "stars", half of which would probably just "phone it in".

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Good point! & I always pondered how *Cagney felt, when the real George M. Cohan-(l878-l942)

was famous for saying-(after like *Ford, watching him repeatedly on stage in "The Last Mile"   *"Spencer Tracy, Your The Best Damn Actor I've Ever seen" unquote

 

Another unique thing about that era of performers-(what's lately been dubbed as "The Hemingway Generation")

Is that most of them started on the stage first

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TCM got a plug from my local paper;   On the front page was a 'things to do on the 4th other than watch fireworks' and one of the items was a picture of Preston and Jones from The Music Man with 'see the Music Man on TCM' written under the picture.

 

On my 2nd vacation to whats left of an empire called HOLLYWOOD-(November of '99) I got to go on what turned out to easily be the mt . summit of all the studio tours-(now of course that Kirk Kirkorian sold-off most of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's 200 acres, now barely 40 & Sony)

 

The Warner Bros. VIP tour was absolutely tremendous!!! :)  :D    & to me it's start was the best pt of it, the museum.  Though I look nowadays at it & it's virtually all "Batman'/."Dark Knight" memorablelia & the little cart took us all past & stopped for over an hour at it's well-known "Town Sq.' Where "Music Man" & tons more were filmed

 

Don't know about now as much, but it then still had instat "Dead End Kids/"Angels With Dirty Faces'/"Hells Kitchen" areas & the more upper crust areas where *Bette Davis worked so much. & the in betweens as well

 

Even 2 elderly gents that worked there-(in the museum) so long & for decades 1 knew Edward G. Robinson a wee-bit. I always regret not inquiring about NATALIE WOOD though!? :wub:   & the massive mountain you see in the background a lot (

​"Daisy Clover") was used on the opposite side as the mountains for TV's "M*A*S*H" "Little House on the Prairie" & others

 

& got to go past what was still the worlds largest sound stage-(4-get it's # right now)

& my friend told me, after the driver said George Clooney & crew were filming 2000's "A Perfect Storm" inside. He said look for a basketball hoop & there it was

(TRIVIA: After attempting to film 1958's magnificent epic "The 0ld Man and the Sea" off the coast of Cuba,etc  *Tracy-(loathed location shoots) & fought a lot w/original director *F. Zinnemann. so WB's changed the director to J. Sturges & they eventually shot the rest in that very same s. stage)

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But, man, man, o, man do I loath that song!!!

 

Don't blame you,  it's the result of bad wanna-a-be singers in Entresto commercials.

 

 

 

Tomorrow, tomorrow......

SHUT UP AND HAVE ONE!!!

 

entresto-tomorrow-large-3.jpg

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Good point! & I always pondered how *Cagney felt, when the real George M. Cohan-(l878-l942)

was famous for saying-(after like *Ford, watching him repeatedly on stage in "The Last Mile"   *"Spencer Tracy, Your The Best Damn Actor I've Ever seen" unquote

 

Another unique thing about that era of performers-(what's lately been dubbed as "The Hemingway Generation")

Is that most of them started on the stage first

Yeah.  But in CAGNEY'S case, HE started on stage as a GIRL!

 

Then there's that period (mostly mid'60's through some of the '70's) when STAGE actors REFUSED to denigrate themselves by making MOVIES.  Thought it beneath them.  I read an article from the early '80's in which an up and coming Broadway "star" named JOHN MALKOVICH said, "Movies are dumb.  A complete waste of an actor's skills and craft.  I feel I'd be better off just sticking with the theater."

 

Since then he's been in more than 70 movies!

 

 

Sepiatone

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A great movie for the 4th would be "Avalon", about grandfather and his family who come to America, and the assimilation and lives of the later generations. A beautiful movie. He arrives in Baltimore on the 4th of July, and wonders at all the celebrating going on around him; his story about coming to America is repeated later in the movie. (Here's a clip of his arrival on the 4th: 

). 
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My apologies for getting in on this great topic a little late.  Here are a few 4th of July movies that we watch at my house:

  • Ah, Wilderness! (1935): My favorite 4th of July movie and one of my favorites of all movies.  It's the story of the Miller family in the summer of 1906, when the second son Richard is just graduating from high school and wanting to experience life and love to their fullest before he goes off to college, while the older generation grapples with Uncle Sid's drinking problem and his unrequited love for Aunt Lilly (they're unmarried in-laws who live with the family).  A great comedy with a great cast -- Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Spring Byington, Aline MacMahon, Eric Linden, Cecilia Parker, Charlie Grapewin, Mickey Rooney, Bonita Granville, Frank Albertson, and Margaret Marquis.  Most of the film takes place on the 4th, as does the underlying wonderful Eugene O'Neill play, which starred the real George M. Cohan (who was replaced on tour by Will Rogers).  But with all due respect to the great O'Neill, I think the movie is better, with some very humorous and true-to-life scenes added by the screenwriting couple Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich.  (Yes, true-to-life: the scene in which Richard delivers a speech at his high school graduation ceremony is exactly what I experienced at mine -- except that I actually did what Richard was prevented from doing.)  This movie inspired the Hardy Family series, and the cast of the first Hardy movie (A Family Affair) was largely drawn from this film, with Lionel Barrymore as Judge Hardy (later replaced by Lewis Stone), Mickey Rooney as Andy Hardy (of course), Spring Byington as Mrs. Hardy (later replaced by Fay Holden), Cecilia Parker as Marion Hardy, Margaret Marquis as Polly Benedict (later replaced by Ann Rutherford), Charlie Grapewin as Frank Redmond, and Eric Linden as Wayne Trent.
  • Houseboat (1958):  Everyone knows that Cary Grant was a master of comedic acting, but who knew that his co-star, Sophia Loren, could also be so funny.  While it's mostly a comedy, there are also touching scenes as Cary tries to take over raising his kids after his estranged wife is killed in a car accident.  The 4th of July is prominently featured.
  • Two Weeks With Love (1950): A very enjoyable musical starring Jane Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Louis Calhern, Ann Harding, Carleton Carpenter, and Ricardo Montalban.  An early 20th-Century New York family visits a Catskills resort over the 4th, and love is in the air for the two sisters, Jane and Debbie.  I don't think it's too much of a spoiler to tell you that a fireworks mishap results in a "grand and glorious 3rd" of July, as hotel owner Clinton Sundberg puts it.  And this has to be one of the only movies in which a corset is a major plot element.
  • Jaws (1975): The big fish is the main attraction, of course, but the story does take place around the 4th of July, which is the reason the island's business leaders are so worried about the beaches being closed because of the shark attacks.  Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, and Murray Hamilton (who's also in Houseboat) are superb.  Although I was in high school when this movie came out, I didn't join my friends who paid to see it over and over.  It's not the kind of movie I'm usually interested in, but once I did see it years later, I had to agree that it's a pretty gripping film, and has a lot of humor, too.

I'm also on board with some of the movies others have mentioned: Yankee Doodle Dandy and The Music Man are among the movies that we sometimes watch over the 4th.

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My apologies for getting in on this great topic a little late.  Here are a few 4th of July movies that we watch at my house:

 

  • Ah, Wilderness! (1935): My favorite 4th of July movie and one of my favorites of all movies.  It's the story of the Miller family in the summer of 1906, when the second son Richard is just graduating from high school and wanting to experience life and love to their fullest before he goes off to college, while the older generation grapples with Uncle Sid's drinking problem and his unrequited love for Aunt Lilly (they're unmarried in-laws who live with the family).  A great comedy with a great cast -- Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Spring Byington, Aline MacMahon, Eric Linden, Cecilia Parker, Charlie Grapewin, Mickey Rooney, Bonita Granville, Frank Albertson, and Margaret Marquis.  Most of the film takes place on the 4th, as does the underlying wonderful Eugene O'Neill play, which starred the real George M. Cohan (who was replaced on tour by Will Rogers).  But with all due respect to the great O'Neill, I think the movie is better, with some very humorous and true-to-life scenes added by the screenwriting couple Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich.  (Yes, true-to-life: the scene in which Richard delivers a speech at his high school graduation ceremony is exactly what I experienced at mine -- except that I actually did what Richard was prevented from doing.)  This movie inspired the Hardy Family series, and the cast of the first Hardy movie (A Family Affair) was largely drawn from this film, with Lionel Barrymore as Judge Hardy (later replaced by Lewis Stone), Mickey Rooney as Andy Hardy (of course), Spring Byington as Mrs. Hardy (later replaced by Fay Holden), Cecilia Parker as Marion Hardy, Margaret Marquis as Polly Benedict (later replaced by Ann Rutherford), Charlie Grapewin as Frank Redmond, and Eric Linden as Wayne Trent.
  • Houseboat (1958):  Everyone knows that Cary Grant was a master of comedic acting, but who knew that his co-star, Sophia Loren, could also be so funny.  While it's mostly a comedy, there are also touching scenes as Cary tries to take over raising his kids after his estranged wife is killed in a car accident.  The 4th of July is prominently featured.
  • Two Weeks With Love (1950): A very enjoyable musical starring Jane Powell, Debbie Reynolds, Louis Calhern, Ann Harding, Carleton Carpenter, and Ricardo Montalban.  An early 20th-Century New York family visits a Catskills resort over the 4th, and love is in the air for the two sisters, Jane and Debbie.  I don't think it's too much of a spoiler to tell you that a fireworks mishap results in a "grand and glorious 3rd" of July, as hotel owner Clinton Sundberg puts it.  And this has to be one of the only movies in which a corset is a major plot element.
  • Jaws (1975): The big fish is the main attraction, of course, but the story does take place around the 4th of July, which is the reason the island's business leaders are so worried about the beaches being closed because of the shark attacks.  Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, and Murray Hamilton (who's also in Houseboat) are superb.  Although I was in high school when this movie came out, I didn't join my friends who paid to see it over and over.  It's not the kind of movie I'm usually interested in, but once I did see it years later, I had to agree that it's a pretty gripping film, and has a lot of humor, too.
I'm also on board with some of the movies others have mentioned: Yankee Doodle Dandy and The Music Man are among the movies that we sometimes watch over the 4th.

One additional 4th of July movie that I can't believe I forgot: Judge Hardy and Son (1939). School's out and the 4th is almost here. What could possibly go wrong for Andy Hardy? Start with his jalopy needing new tires, Polly requiring flowers and box seats for the upcoming fireworks, and Andy needing a new white dinner jacket for the event. There's an essay contest focused on the founding-father-of-the-hour Alexander Hamilton, which Andy thinks will bring him the prize money to solve his problems. And the Judge is trying to find the daughter of some elderly immigrants who are about to lose their home. Meanwhile, Mrs. Hardy comes down with a life-threatening illness. In other words, another outstanding story about the Hardys!

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