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There are of course some notorious elements to how Hitchcock depicted and treated women characters (and sometimes actresses).  I'm sure there will be some analysis on this as we move deeper into the course.  

 

But it seems to me that this notorious aspect developed late in his career, and it is interesting to see how the women are portrayed in earlier movies.  I would observe that they are often the central character.  This is arguably true of his first talkie, Blackmail.  It is definitely true of Young and Innocent, Rebecca, Suspicion, and Shadow of a Doubt. 

 

Yes, it's interesting to note the big roles and sympathetic handling of women,

 

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There are of course some notorious elements to how Hitchcock depicted and treated women characters (and sometimes actresses).  I'm sure there will be some analysis on this as we move deeper into the course.  

 

But it seems to me that this notorious aspect developed late in his career, and it is interesting to see how the women are portrayed in earlier movies.  I would observe that they are often the central character.  This is arguably true of his first talkie, Blackmail.  It is definitely true of Young and Innocent, Rebecca, Suspicion, and Shadow of a Doubt. 

 

Yes, it's interesting to note the big roles and sympathetic handling of women,

 

Funny you mention 'notorious elements' since I would add Notorious to the list of Hitchcock women-centric films.    The entire film is based around the actions of the Bergman character.

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Yes, Notorious as well, and maybe the other two with Bergman, though I have to say I have a fuzzy memory of those.  

 

And wouldn't Grace Kelly be the equal of her male co-stars?

 

Kelly is the equal of her male co-stars but in films like Rear Window she has a relatively small part when compare to Jimmy Stewart. 

 

You know the old saying; never make a film with a kid,  a dog,  or a co-star with a broken leg!    ;)

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The Birds is definitely woman-centric as the entire film is about Tippi Hedren's experience with "The Birds."  Even in Psycho, despite Janet Leigh's character dying in the first thirty minutes or so, the entire film revolves around her disappearance.  

 

I would agree that Grace Kelly is the center of Dial M For Murder.  However, in Rear Window, she along with Thelma Ritter are more auxiliary characters.  James Stewart is the center of the action.  Even in To Catch a Thief, I would say that Cary Grant is the central character in that film.

 

Rope and Strangers on a Train are two interesting Hitchcock films in which there aren't really any central female characters.  However, there are a pair of male leads in both films who oftentimes may exhibit some traits more common in female characters.  

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I think Marnie and The Birds suffer because of Tippi. Hitch appeared to get arrogant and infatuated with turning her into a star where a more famous, accomplished,  and bankable actress would have been much better for the roles. Marnie suffered the most from that. I never liked Tippi's acting.

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I know there some who really like or are fascinated by Marnie.  I've watched it just once and thought it was dreadful--certainly one of Hitch's worst movies.

 

 

***SPOILER ALERT***

 

I didn't like Marnie.  I thought it was too over the top.  I am also not usually a fan of movies that involve rape or anything like that.  Sean Connery's character rapes Marnie and later it turns out that her emotional issues are due to an uncomfortable childhood experience with one of her mother's boyfriends.  That was not an enjoyable film to watch.

 

Starting with Psycho, Hitch's films really started to take a different turn.  While I like Psycho, I prefer his studio era films.  They had a bit of romance intertwined with the suspense.  

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I think Marnie and The Birds suffer because of Tippi. Hitch appeared to get arrogant and infatuated with turning her into a star where a more famous, accomplished,  and bankable actress would have been much better for the roles. Marnie suffered the most from that. I never liked Tippi's acting.

 

My favorite part of The Birds is when that woman screams at Tippi Hedren in the diner.  She blames her for "The Birds" showing up and then tells her that she's evil.  This woman's hysterics are so over the top--she rivals the "Hail Satan!" lady from Rosemary's Baby.  

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[

I agree I tried to watch I and didn't make it thru. I found Marnie mysognistic and I don't like movies with rape in it either. The whole premise of the movie didn't sit well with me. It was too off and strange in a bad way. But then again I don't like hitch movies after 1960. I do like the tv series Alfred Hitchcock presents

 

quote name=speedracer5" post="1537879" timestamp="1499955976]***SPOILER ALERT***

 

 

 

 

 

I didn't like Marnie.  I thought it was too over the top.  I am also not usually a fan of movies that involve rape or anything like that.  Sean Connery's character rapes Marnie and later it turns out that her emotional issues are due to an uncomfortable childhood experience with one of her mother's boyfriends.  That was not an enjoyable film to watch.

 

Starting with Psycho, Hitch's films really started to take a different turn.  While I like Psycho, I prefer his studio era films.  They had a bit of romance intertwined with the suspense.

 

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Kelly is the equal of her male co-stars but in films like Rear Window she has a relatively small part when compare to Jimmy Stewart. 

 

You know the old saying; never make a film with a kid,  a dog,  or a co-star with a broken leg!    ;)

 

That's true, but her character does have a lot of agency. I'll have to re-watch this coming week. But the rom-com parts of the movie were very clear to me when I managed to catch a screening at the local theater. She sets out to disprove Stewart's initial image of her, and she's the one who puts herself into harms way--cracking the case. I'm not sure I'd call it progressive, but Kelly's character is definitely very competitive and pro-active.

 

The movie is more centered and Stewart's POV, structurally and stylistically and with it's themes, but it gradually reveals to the audience that he and Kelly are companions and very much interested in the same things; in other words, she's not simply putting on an act or mask to "win her man." 

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Funny you mention 'notorious elements' since I would add Notorious to the list of Hitchcock women-centric films.    The entire film is based around the actions of the Bergman character.

 

Yes, she's also the most sympathetic character, in my opinion. But when you watch the film and how nasty Cary Grant is to her, at least with modern eyes, it gives a whole other sense of Hitchcock's warped relationship with romance and some of his misogyny. Not saying it's not a great movie. It is.  It might be the best 'Hitchcock' of Hitchcock movies. 

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I could think of Suspicion as a women-centric film. Lina McLaidlaw (Joan Fontaine), a timid rich girl who ran away with Johnnie Aysgarth (Cary Grant) whose intention was to obtain her wealth only to find out that she doesn't inherit any money at all....

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