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If the ord. man placed in ext. circumstances, the "Mcguffin", and drama/thriller laced with humor were the foundation of Hitchcock's "British Thriller Sextet"( 34-38), I would argue that "Foreign Correspondent" not "Shadow of Doubt" was Hitchcock's most significant film during the 1940's. Foreign Correspondent linked the earlier " Sextet Era" with Hitchcock's " High Era"(53-63) with films like N/NW and " To Catch a Thief" as prime examples of this genre. This trend was also seen in Hitchcock's "Declining Era"(64-76) in films like "Torn Curtain". "Shadow of Doubt's" greatest impact was during the brief "Low Period"(47-52) in films like "Stage Freight" and "I Confess". This is why the adv/thriller type film like "Foreign Correspondent" is more a significant type of genre than the "Noir" influenced film "Shadow of Doubt" in Hitchcock's body of work with the exception of "Psycho" which in many ways is his most famous picture. On second thought, with "Psycho" in mind maybe I'm wrong, "Shadow of Doubt" might be Hitchcock's most significant film from the 1940's.

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That was an interesting reversal at the end!

 

Foreign Correspondent is OK, but it never struck as a major Hitch film.  It just seems to be a variation on the films from the "thriller sextet."

 

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If the ord. man placed in ext. circumstances, the "Mcguffin", and drama/thriller laced with humor were the foundation of Hitchcock's "British Thriller Sextet"( 34-38), I would argue that "Foreign Correspondent" not "Shadow of Doubt" was Hitchcock's most significant film during the 1940's. Foreign Correspondent linked the earlier " Sextet Era" with Hitchcock's " High Era"(53-63) with films like N/NW and " To Catch a Thief" as prime examples of this genre. This trend was also seen in Hitchcock's "Declining Era"(64-76) in films like "Torn Curtain". "Shadow of Doubt's" greatest impact was during the brief "Low Period"(47-52) in films like "Stage Freight" and "I Confess". This is why the adv/thriller type film like "Foreign Correspondent" is more a significant type of genre than the "Noir" influenced film "Shadow of Doubt" in Hitchcock's body of work with the exception of "Psycho" which in many ways is his most famous picture. On second thought, with "Psycho" in mind maybe I'm wrong, "Shadow of Doubt" might be Hitchcock's most significant film from the 1940's.

Shadow of a Doubt and Notorious. Don't forget that one. Those two films are his best of the 40's and are the ones you pick from that decade to show someone who Hitchcock was as a director and maker of movies. Foreign Correspondent may be the link but Notorious is the true masterwork.

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Jones/Haverstock (is this a joke on having to change your name, as many did in Hollywood?  Constantly losing the bowler hat.  In hotel calling for everyone to go to his room, almost like Marx Brothers in the ships cabin in Night at the Opera.  Comedy.

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i love this film! I like it because of it's oddities. It starts off very American, then European, then there is that old man that gets senile and mumbles everytime the reporter asks him a questions.  The windmill, George Sanders. I think this film is  brilliant! No one else could pull together so many plot and character changes!

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Great film! I suspect it's often overlooked because it doesn't feel as personal as some of his more celebrated works and perhaps because it doesn't seem to represent any kind of advance or anything different.

 

I think it takes a little time to get going, but once it does it's a lot of fun. The chemistry between the two leads is not all it could be (which is more the fault of the screenplay than the performers), but on the other hand, it's got the marvelous scene where everyone gathers together to talk over there differences on the flight back to the US, and one realizes that deep down this film is utterly mad.

 

"Ring up Crescent Dancing Academy and cancel my rhumba lesson!"

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Great film! I suspect it's often overlooked because it doesn't feel as personal as some of his more celebrated works and perhaps because it doesn't seem to represent any kind of advance or anything different.

 

I think it takes a little time to get going, but once it does it's a lot of fun. The chemistry between the two leads is not all it could be (which is more the fault of the screenplay than the performers), but on the other hand, it's got the marvelous scene where everyone gathers together to talk over there differences on the flight back to the US, and one realizes that deep down this film is utterly mad.

 

"Ring up Crescent Dancing Academy and cancel my rhumba lesson!"

 

I agree.  As for 'this film is utterly mad';    you didn't even need to mention the so called bodyguard,  played by Edmund Gwenn, to make this point.    His small role has to be one of the most 'out-there' one can find in any Hitchcock film.

 

Another thing that draws me in is the role of the Marshall character;   he is a well balanced person,  and not just a cardboard 'bad-guy'.    Oh,  he will allow torture when necessary,  but clearly wishes it could be avoided.    He deeply loves his daughter as much as the cause he is fighting for.    Too often bad-guys are portrayed as one-dimensional characters.    Not the case here.

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Just finished viewing Foreign Correspondent. The plane crash scene is amazing! The last part of the movie was interesting in that it turned into a war propaganda film; I got a little teary eyed, as I do. Makes me think a future course might be war-time propaganda films; what do you think? One thing that confused me about the film was how cordial the newspaper men (McCrea and Sanders) were to Fisher: a traitor, kidnapper, and accomplice to murder. I felt no sympathy toward the character at all until he went off the side of that wing.

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Just finished viewing Foreign Correspondent. The plane crash scene is amazing! The last part of the movie was interesting in that it turned into a war propaganda film; I got a little teary eyed, as I do. Makes me think a future course might be war-time propaganda films; what do you think? One thing that confused me about the film was how cordial the newspaper men (McCrea and Sanders) were to Fisher: a traitor, kidnapper, and accomplice to murder. I felt no sympathy toward the character at all until he went off the side of that wing.

 

The only reason both the Sanders and McCrea characters treated  Fisher cordially was because they had empathy for his daughter (and of course the McCrea character was in love with her).

 

So it wasn't sympathy towards Fisher but his daughter.  

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