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ChiO

"A" Is for Auteur

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Hey, Miss Awakening (it looks great on you) -- I'll rent that A Place in the Sun dvd to check out those extras!

 

I think you'll enjoy it since you really like Mankiewicz and I'm pretty sure you appreciate Capra, Mamoulian, Zinnemann, and Wise. The DVD also has a commentary track done by George Stevens Jr. and Ivan Moffat, which I still have to listen to myself, and interviews with Liz, Shelley, Stevens Jr., and Moffat. It's a really good DVD, especially for the price.

 

Hi, ChiO -- I'm still checking off films from the Fritz Lang list. I watched this film for the first time on Wednesday:

 

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I've seen 24 of Lang's 39 films now. I have ordered Lang's Indian Epic and The Spiders. I hope to watch these epics in December. I still have to watch Western Union, which I have on tape.

 

I taped Anthony Mann's Desperate off of TCM on Friday. Mann is another director that I'm trying to watch all of his films.

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Well, I don't think I will [buy] the dvd since I'm not crazy about the movie (I don't really like Montgomery Clift) but I am curious to see all the extras. Especially if, as you say, Elizabeth gives an interview.

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Well, I don't think I will buy the dvd since I'm not crazy about the movie (I don't really like Montgomery Clift)

 

No? I really like the film, but I'm someone who likes Monty Clift, too.

 

but I am curious to see all the extras. Especially if, as you say, Elizabeth gives an interview.

 

Liz is in a documentary that lasts about 22 minutes. You also get the 8 filmmakers talking about George Stevens and film in general. It's a fascinating journey. It's not short, either. And then there's the commentary, too. I haven't listened to that yet, though.

 

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My late-Birthday/early-Christmas gift to myself arrived today:

 

Fritz Lang's The Spiders

 

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Fritz Lang's Indian Epic

 

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I never heard of either of those two Lang films, let us know how you like them. The title alone of *The Spiders* is creepy enough already!

 

Looks like Ellen's lake there in the background. People who are in the way tend to sink fast in that one.

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Well hello there, Nightowl. This is a pleasant surprise.

 

I never heard of either of those two Lang films, let us know how you like them. The title alone of The Spiders is creepy enough already!

 

From IMDb:

 

A desperate, haggard-looking man puts a message into a bottle, and is able to throw it into the sea just as he is shot by an arrow. Some time later, well-known sportsman Kay Hoog announces to a large audience that he has found the message, which tells of a lost civilization that possesses an immense treasure. Hoog immediately plans an expedition to find it. But Lio Sha, the head of a criminal organization known as the Spiders, plans her own expedition, and she is determined to get the treasure for herself.

 

The Spiders was to be a four-part series but Lang only made two parts of the film. The final two were never made. The Spiders is one of the first Indiana Jones-type of films.

 

The Indian Epic is also a two-film series in the vein of Indiana Jones, too. Here's a quick little backstory on the film:

 

From IMDb:

 

Joe May contracted with authoress Thea von Harbou to write the script for THE Indian TOMB, based on her 1917 novella, assigning young Fritz Lang as her co-writer. Lang, who married von Harbou after starting the writing project, desired to direct the films himself, but he was deemed too inexperienced for such an important project by the financiers and May enthusiastically became the director. Furious, Lang left May's employ; it would be more than 35 years before he was able to direct his own Indian TOMB films. (After their divorce, von Harbou became Nazi Germany's official screenwriter; because of his Jewish ancestry, Lang felt it wisest to settle in Los Angeles.)

 

Looks like Ellen's lake there in the background. People who are in the way tend to sink fast in that one.

 

Good one! I see you haven't lost your sense of humor so deep in the night.

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Interesting, I never would have imagined Lang wanting to direct films of that nature. I guess I am locked into thinking of him as a "noir" director when in fact he did so many other kinds of films (which I have to get around to watching).

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