Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Party Girl: The Last Film Noir ?


Recommended Posts

Does anyone agree with me that the MGM film Party Girl was the final Film Noir after Hollywood gave goodbye to this mysterious yet unique genre. You are most welcome to either agree or disagree with this topic.

post-60817-0-03311100-1500987673_thumb.jpg

post-60817-0-03311100-1500987673_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone agree with me that the MGM film Party Girl was the final Film Noir after Hollywood gave goodbye to this mysterious yet unique genre. You are most welcome to either agree or disagree with this topic.

 

 

If one doesn't include neo-noir films, E.g. Chinatown,   then Party Girl,  released in 1958 is one of the last noir films from the 'classic noir era'.

 

But I say Odds Against Tomorrow,  released in 1959 by United Artist,  is the last one from that era.     The film has noir icons Robert Ryan and Gloria Grahame, has strong noir visuals and themes (e.g. Ryan needing to feel 'big' again, with one last score).

 

Of course others say films like Underworld USA released in 1961 and Cape Fear in 1962 are clearly noir films so in that vein,  there isn't really a cutoff.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I guess I'm on the fence about whether or not "Party Girl" is film noir.  All I know is that I've enjoyed the movie for a long time, with a great cast.  Besides, it provided Cyd Charisse with two tremendous musical numbers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'm on the fence about whether or not "Party Girl" is film noir.  All I know is that I've enjoyed the movie for a long time, with a great cast.  Besides, it provided Cyd Charisse with two tremendous musical numbers.

 

Party Girl has many noir elements and themes.   Yea,  it is in color but I still say the film has enough noir elements to be 'noir'.  

 

PS: So does the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

I've never cared for lines, limits or borders when it comes to art. I like to think that noir, like so many other movements will continue to evolve and still be relevant as time goes on.

I guess after the WWII, the studio system and the Cold War ended, some things did end for sure.

 

Quote

PS: So does the book Film Noir (Ward \ Silver).

I have that book. Bought it long ago when I first started to watch TCM.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/29/2018 at 11:52 PM, GGGGerald said:

I've never cared for lines, limits or borders when it comes to art. I like to think that noir, like so many other movements will continue to evolve and still be relevant as time goes on.

I guess after the WWII, the studio system and the Cold War ended, some things did end for sure.

 

I have that book. Bought it long ago when I first started to watch TCM.

Lines, limits and borders (categorization \ classification) are useful for discussion purposes.   I.e. when 'anything can be everything' it makes it more difficult to communicate. 

What I don't care for is when one gets too serious about these artificial, but useful for discussion purposes,  categorizations.   E.g. when I see 'pure' or 'true' used,   I tend to run for the hills!   :lol: 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Film Noir seems to be in the eyes of the viewer. I think there are strict requirements for meeting the genre, as well as loosey goosey ones. One of my fave pics of all time is Laura. Some have classified it as Noir, I would not. I'm new to this, and I hope I'm doing things right.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, casey said:

Film Noir seems to be in the eyes of the viewer. I think there are strict requirements for meeting the genre, as well as loosey goosey ones. One of my fave pics of all time is Laura. Some have classified it as Noir, I would not. I'm new to this, and I hope I'm doing things right.

Of course there is a subjective viewpoint as it relates to what makes a film a noir film (e.g. the criteria like lighting and use of motifs,   themes,   character types etc...).

As for Laura;  well 99.9% of books on Film Noir lists Laura as one of the classic noir films.   The basic reasons are that it contains most of the 'standard' noir criteria.     But it is missing a femme fatale  (unlike,  say Out of The Past another film that is often mentioned as a classic noir).    I point this out since no film meets all of the criteria  (some 50 noirs attempt to and they come off as heavy handed;   i.e. trying too hard to be too noir).

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...