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FAMOUS MOVIE QUOTES


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mr6666 wrote:

 

dan, it's been 2 days, want to give any more clues, or just the answer?

 

 

Yes. The film is "Live Free or Die Hard" (2007). Maybe I should have said it's a recent film, to distinguish it from Golden Age classics.

 

mr6666, here is what film historian William K. Everson had to say about Griffith's "The Escape" (1914):

 

"...it is perhaps indicative of his faith in the medium and of his over-generous estimation of audience intelligence and taste that he would have selected this story -- from a Paul Armstrong play -- as having commercial potential. For 'The Escape,' despite an ultimately happy ending for two of its protagonists, is an almost unrelievedly sordid procession of brutality, madness, sex, disease, and death....

 

"If nothing else, 'The Escape' might well qualify as the first feature-length film noir...."

 

This film starred Donald Crisp, F.A. Turner, Robert Harron, Blache Sweet, and Mae Marsh.

 

"The Escape" is apparently a lost film. There is a lengthy synopsis of it in The American Film Institute Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-1920, but it is too lengthy to replicate here. The AFI catalogs are, I believe, available at any good public library.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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> (though my referance has Mitchum/'Coyle' saying the line, who am I to argue with imdb?)

 

It may be that you and imdb are both right. It may be that Coyle said it to Jackie, and Jackie

in turn said it to the larcenous G Is he was buying from. Anyway:

 

"It looks to me like three grandmothers with brooms could brush us off that cliff like flies off a

sugar cake."

 

Who, to whom, what context?

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> "It looks to me like three grandmothers with brooms could brush us off that cliff like flies off a

> sugar cake."

>

> Who, to whom, what context?

 

...In The Longest Day, that was a comment made to Fabian by Paul Anka as the Rangers

were about to climb the fortified cliffs at Normandy.

 

This next short quote is the curtain line of a well-known movie. In context it carries a lot of irony:

 

"I wonder who won."

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> This next short quote is the curtain line of a well-known movie. In context it carries a lot of irony:

>

> "I wonder who won."

 

I didn't change movies to get to this quote. At the end of The Longest Day, Richard Burton

(shot-down RAF pilot) and Richard Beymer (paratrooper seperated from his unit) are sitting in

a French farmyard, both exhausted. Beymer has the final line."

 

Now another curtain line from another well-known movie:

 

"Boy, oh boy, oh boy, killin' Generals could get to be a habit wit me!"

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Charles Bronson/'Wladislaw' in *The Dirty Dozen*?

 

If right, try: "One man's hymns of praise became other men's curses. People spoke the same language, but could not understand each other"

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mr6666 wrote:

 

"One man's hymns of praise became other men's curses. People spoke the same language, but could not understand each other"

 

 

 

Kinda sneaky, mr6666, using a silent film. But hey, if it works....

 

That's Brigitte Helm, in "Metropolis" (1927).

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Okay, see how fast you can come up with this one:

 

"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."

 

Who said that, and in what famous film?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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mr6666 wrote:

 

The Last Woman (1976)?

 

 

No, not "L'Ultima Donna" (1976), but I'd be interested to hear why you associated the quote with that film.

 

On the basis of the reviews available on the Internet, it doesn't seem to have anything to do with the quote. Let me add this: The film in question has A LOT to do with the quote I mentioned.

 

Here it is again:

 

"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."

 

Who said that, and in what famous film?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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sixes wrote:

 

Google made the association. Never saw it & probably never will.

 

 

 

Good! Finally, I create a Google-proof question!

 

Don't worry though, I have posted other questions that I thought were Googleproof, and somebody always answers them.

 

Here's the quote again, with an extra clue.

 

*"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."*

 

Who said that, and in what famous film?

 

Extra clue: It's a Robert Blake film.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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cmv wrote:

 

In Cold Blood ?

 

 

No, not "In Cold Blood" (1967). There is a lot of moralizing about homicide and its various degrees in that film, but the quote in question is not in it.

 

Here it is again:

 

 

 

*"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."*

 

Who said that line, and in what famous movie?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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sixes wrote:

 

Electra Glide in Blue?

 

 

 

No, not "Electra Glide in Blue" (1973).

 

Here is the quote again, and I've added a new clue.

 

 

*"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."*

 

Who said that line, and in what famous movie?

 

And the new clue is:

 

One of the main characters -- indeed, a KEY character -- is seen very briefly in the first reel, and is not seen again until the movie is more than an hour old.

 

When I say the person is seen "briefly," I mean in the twinkling of an eye.

 

But the movie would not work without this character in it.

 

Who said the above quote, and in what movie?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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cmv wrote:

 

*Money Train?*

 

 

 

No, it isn't "Money Train" (1995). I would love to know, cmvqor, how you came up with that title.

 

Is the quote I gave you guys even REMOTELY associated with "Money Train?"

 

I'd just like to know how you're coming up with these titles.

 

To repeat:

 

*"The various legal categories such as first and second degree murder, the various degrees of homicide, manslaughter, are civilized recognitions of impulses of various degrees of culpability."*

 

Who said that line, and in what famous movie?

 

A new clue is:

 

One of the main characters -- indeed, a KEY character -- is seen very briefly in the first reel, and is not seen again until the movie is more than an hour old.

 

But the movie would not work without this character in it.

 

Who said the above quote, and in what movie?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Yo, dan;

 

I knew that was a longshot, but I don't go into deep delving on trivia questions. With the name of Mr. Blake and the subjects of Law and Law enforcement being in the mix, I take guesses

and I'm surprised at how often I get lucky. By the way, is the source one of those plots where

Mr. Blake is priest in a tough neighborhood, always getting involved in legal matters? I more-or-

less ignored those, because I thought they were TV movies.

 

By the way, was it The Purple Gang or that TV biopic about that guy John List?

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