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FAMOUS MOVIE QUOTES


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Okay, here's one that you might remember:

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

Who said that, and in what film? Hint: The film was made in the 1930s.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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No, not "Things to Come" (1936).

 

That H.G. Wells film was a bleak drama, whereas the guy we are looking for made his statement (the quote) in a comedy. But coincidentally, in that comedy there's a scene that is very reminiscent of "Things to Come."

 

The quote, again:

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

Additional hint: The speaker says that quote in several different scenes of the movie we're looking for.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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No, not "Topper" and not "Here Comes Mr. Jordan." It should be mentioned that HCMJ is a 1941 picture, so it would not qualify as a movie made in the thirties.

 

Additional hint: The quote is spoken -- several times -- by the man who plays the father of the movie's main star.

 

Here is the quote, again:

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

The film in question, as I've said, was made in the 1930s.

 

Who said that? And in what film?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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cmvgor wrote:

 

 

 

Is that comment buried in one of the long-winded speeches of "Grandapa Vanderhoff" (Lionel Barrymore) in You Can't Take It With You (1938) ??

 

 

 

Sorry, no. Martin Vanderhoff was a rather benevolent character. But our guy -- the character he plays, that is -- is more self-absorbed.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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No, not "Pygmalion" (1938) and not "Bachelor Mother" (1939).

 

Here's a new hint: The movie in question is a _musical_. There were a lot of musical films in the 1930s.

 

 

 

 

 

Here is the quote, again:

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

The film in question, as I've said, was made in the 1930s.

 

Additional hint: The quote is spoken -- several times -- by the man who plays the father of the movie's main star.

 

Who said that? And in what film?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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sixes wrote:

 

 

hey, after 3 guesses, don't we get 2 more clues?

British production? director? actors? plot?

 

 

Hey sixes, now THAT'S the spirit! That's getting into the spirit of the game. My last two threads were eventually abandoned by me, because nobody was making any real attempt to solve the questions.

 

Okay. You want more clues? How about these:

 

The character that speaks the quote is the father of the film's main character. When he asks for hush money to cover up a scandal, he says the quote as a salve to his conscience, since essentially he is blackmailing the young man in the scene. Thus, the quote:

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

He repeats the line several times during the course of the film. As I've said, it's a musical, so in the style of most 1930s musicals the film ends with a rousing musical number, with lots of singing. But the last _spoken_ line of the film is, again, the quote above.

 

"I'm a reasonable man. As long as I can keep body and soul together, that's all I ask for, here below."

 

Who said that, and in what movie?

 

As for giving you names of actors, film studio, and plot... sorry, sixes. You are asking me to give the game away. But I will add this:

 

The young man who is being blackmailed is played by an actor who would later play one of the most famous nephews ever, in a movie based on Charles Dickens.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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mudski wrote:

 

"Gold Diggers Of 1933 ?"

 

 

No. But wow, now I'm going to have to dig into the cast list of that movie, to see if there is anyone who could possibly satisfy this question.

 

I've told you that the speaker of the quote plays the father of the movie's main character.

 

In "GDs of '33," the principal male characters are played by Warren William, Dick Powell, Guy Kibbee, and Ned Sparks. But guess what? All four (4) of those characters are unmarried and childless.

 

WHY would you pick that movie title? What is it about "GDs of '33" that would make you think that film is part of the correct answer to the question?

 

Puzzled,

Dan

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In my case, it wasn't a lack of attempt. It was just that I have more interest in questions involving classic movies and the classic film period, rather than recent stuff. This is, after all, the Turner Classic Movies message board, not the Turner Recent Movies message board.

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After doing some homework, I'm guessing that the movie is EVERGREEN, and that the actor being blackmailed is Barry Mackay, who played nephew Fred in the lackluster MGM version of A CHRISTMAS CAROL.

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phroso wrote:

 

 

After doing some homework, I'm guessing that the movie is EVERGREEN, and that the actor being blackmailed is Barry Mackay, who played nephew Fred in the lackluster MGM version of A CHRISTMAS CAROL.

 

 

Phroso, that is correct... in part. But I am so glad to receive even a partially correct answer to this question, I'll waive the rest and tell you:

 

Hartley Power is the actor who blackmails Barry Mackay, and the film is, indeed, "Evergreen" (1934).

 

If you folks haven't seen "Evergreen" (1934), you're missing out. It's a delightful romp starring the exquisite Jessie Matthews, in the role that made her a star. In later years, Ms. Matthews would reappear on screen as Russ Tamblyn's mother in "Tom Thumb" (1958), and she had a long-running radio show in England called "Mrs. Dale's Diary."

 

I had the honor and privilege of meeting Jessie Matthews and holding her little hand in mine, when she came to the States and presented a one-woman show at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in 1980. She was exquisite in the 1930s, and exquisite still, in 1980. She passed away the following year.

 

Phroso, you're up at bat.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Thanks, eldorado, and 6's, for the shout-out. I'm not an operetta buff, but I saw EVERGREEN about a year ago, and thought Jessie Matthews was captivating.

 

 

 

Next line:

 

"Lawyers should never marry other lawyers. This is called inbreeding, from which comes idiot children and more lawyers."

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David Wayne in ADAM'S RIB is correct. It's nice to know that the public perception of the legal profession was just as sterling 60 years ago as it is today. Nice going, mudskipper. The board is yours . . .

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