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new, but so cool Coen Bros. "MILLER'S CROSSING"


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Super cool, noir Gangsta' film w/ crackin' dialogue and too many memorable lines to list...

"What's the rumpus?", "So take yer flunkie & dangle"...on & on, gotta'love it!!!

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Hi, Rebelene -- Welcome to the board!

 

The Coen Brothers are my favorite filmmakers of today. I'm hoping to see No Country for Old Men this Friday. Blood Simple is my favorite film of theirs, followed by Fargo and Barton Fink. I also like Miller's Crossing, Raising Arizona, and The Man Who Wasn't There.

 

millerscrossing1.jpg

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[Welcome, Rebelene] -- *Miller's Crossing* is enjoyable every time I watch it. And Joel Coen, along with Tim Burton and Jim Jarmusch, is a favorite contemporary American director. The only two features of his that I haven't seen are *Crimewave* and *No Country for Old Men* . The only ones that made me cringe are *Intolerable Cruelty* and *The Ladykillers* , so I'm hoping that *No Country for Old Men* is (for me) a return to form.

 

Yes, I'm a h-u-g-e fan of *The Big Lebowski* . There's no accounting for taste.

 

And, *Miller's Crossing* was released in 1990. That's 17 years ago. When does a movie cease to be "new"? Oh, the debate rages on.

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I'm also a fan of this film. I think it's greatest aspect is it's ability to use the old style hardboiled lines and humor to create something that has that old familar feel with modern production values. Many times when people use this type of language in a modern film, it just sounds stupid, but it actually works here.

 

Themewise the film borrows quite a bit from THE GLASS KEY (1942) with a bit of THIRD MAN (1949) ending, but it's a nice homage.

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> {quote:title=Arkadin wrote:}{quote}

> I'm also a fan of this film. I think it's greatest aspect is it's ability to use the old style hardboiled lines and humor to create something that has that old familar feel with modern production values. Many times when people use this type of language in a modern film, it just sounds stupid, but it actually works here.

>

> Themewise the film borrows quite a bit from THE GLASS KEY (1942) with a bit of THIRD MAN (1949) ending, but it's a nice homage.

 

Pretty sharp analysis, Arkadin. I think also the violence is much more explicit that it would have been in most of the movies it pays homage to. Looking at it almost 20 years after its initial release, it seems to me to have a very nice, almost timeless quality, it doesn't feel to me like a 90s movie, but one that could have been made at almost any time in the last quarter-century.

 

One of the interesting topics of discussion about the movie is how much Gabriel Byrne's character was really able to "plan ahead" what was going to happen, and how much of it he simply improvised. It is an element of the movie that I feel can keep it fresh through repeat viewings.

 

And there is the interesting theory that the image of the hat blowing in the wind is really a kind of analogy for what Tom's life is like with all the apparent double-crossing going on, that he has become like a hat blown by the wind in somewhat unexpected directions and with something of an uncertain destination. But at least, there's a sense that you at least know in which general direction the wind is blowing.

 

Interesting stuff.

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