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bansi4

Gone Without Fanfare

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Liked him in 1987's "Overboard"

as Captain Karl,and numerous T.V. roles through out the 70's

 

RIP Mr.Campanella.

 

 

 

 

 

 

vallo

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I read in the NY Times this morning that the very likeable character actor Ron Carey died last Tuesday at the age of 71. He was an on-screen sweetie.

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He was great in "Barney Miller" and 3 Mel Brooks films Silent Move, and "The History of the World Part 1 and as Brophy in High Anxiety ( Side kick and Comedy Relief ).

 

Rest in Peace Mr. Carey

 

vallo

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What a shame! I remember him in Mel Brook's "High Anxiety" lifting the trunk snd suitcases...."I got it!...I got it!...I don't got it! Rest in peace Mr. Carey!

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Nah, it can't be. Not that sweet, little elfin, modern master of the very slow burn and muted longing, Ron Carey--gone. First of all, there's no way that the guy was 71. In my mind's eye he's eternally about 35, leading a life of quiet desperation and rising resentment as a desk jockey at the station house in Barney Miller. Let's not forget Mr. Carey's contributions to several Mel Brooks' comedies, notably Silent Movie (1976), High Anxiety (1977) and, as a character aptly named "Swiftus" in History of the World, Part I (1981). Maybe he was one of those guys who was born too late for the silent era, when his largely mute presence would have been even more notable as a helpmate or human obstacle in the comedies of a Chaplin or Keaton?

 

Thanks Ron, you made the world a funnier place.

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From the San Francisco Chronicle:

 

"Sneaky" Pete Kleinow lived parallel lives over his seven decades, each with enviable success. In one, he helped animate the green clay character Gumby and designed special effects for Star Wars. He received an Emmy in 1983 for his work on the Winds of War. In the other, he played guitar with John Lennon, Joni Mitchell and Billy Joel, and opened for the Rolling Stones at Altamont as the guitarist for the Flying Burrito Brothers.

 

Through much of the 1960's, he worked with Art Clokey Productions, helping with animation, design and puppets for the Gumby and Davy and Goliath cartoons. He worked separately on the television series Outer Limits and on stop-motion commercials that included the animated Pillsbury Doughboy and pancake syrup Mrs. Butterworth.

 

In the early 1970's he put his special effects work on hold while performing with the Flying Burrito Brothers, and with Joe Cocker, Frank Zappa, the Bee Gees, Fleetwood Mac, among others. He returned to special effects in 1974, when he worked on the Land of the Lost television series. In 1980, he worked with Industrial Light and Magic in San Rafael on Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back and later with Fantasy II Film Effects on Gremlins, Terminator and Dune.

 

Mr. Kleinow, who brought country music's steel guitar into the rock 'n' roll arena while creating Hollywood's special effects, died January 6 in Petaluma, of complications related to Alzeimer's. He was 72.

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I thought I was the only one who noticed this one. I was amazed that he married at 18 and was still with her at his death. How often does that happen in the entertainment business? Also fascinated that his memorial will be at Joshua Tree, infamous of course because of his friend/bandmate Gram Parsons' bizarre cremation there (dramatized in Gram Theft Parsons).

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This late report in from AOL.

 

 

'Barney Miller's' Officer Levitt, Ron Carey Dies

AP

 

LOS ANGELES (Jan. 21) - Ron Carey, an actor best known for his work as a cocky, height-challenged policeman on the 1970s TV comedy "Barney Miller," has died. He was 71.

 

Carey died of a stroke Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said Michael Ciccolini, an extended relative and family spokesman.

 

Carey had a recurring role on "Barney Miller" from 1976 to 1982 as Officer Carl Levitt, who yearned for a promotion to detective in the New York squad room run by Capt. Barney Miller (Hal Linden).

 

Carey also appeared in several Mel Brooks movies, including "High Anxiety" and "History of the World Part I."

 

"Ron Carey was truly talented, very funny and one of the dearest men I've ever worked with," Brooks said in a statement.

 

Carey played a Boston cab driver in the 1970 Jack Lemmon comedy "The Out of Towners." He also appeared in scores of commercials, and took pride in being a supporting player and a character actor.

 

"Stars are stars," he told Newsday in 1989. "But without us, the show wouldn't go on."

 

Carey was born Ronald Joseph Cicenia on Dec. 11, 1935, in Newark, N.J.

 

He launched his stand-up comedy career in New York after earning a bachelor's degree in communications from Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J., in 1956. He made his first national television appearance a decade later on "The Merv Griffin Show." Appearances on "The Tonight Show" and the "Ed Sullivan Show" followed.

 

Carey is survived by his wife, Sharon, and his brother, Jimmy Cicenia.

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Actress-Singer Barbara McNair dies

From yahoo.com

LOS ANGELES - Singer Barbara McNair, who became a film and television star in an era when such opportunities were opening up for black women, has died, her sister said. She was 72.

McNair died Sunday after a battle with throat cancer in Los Angeles, sister Jacqueline Gaither said.

 

"She was very family oriented," Gaither said. "She was more than just a star or a famous personality. She was a person of her own."

 

McNair made her Hollywood acting debut in 1968 in the film, "If He Hollers, Let Him Go."

 

She later starred opposite Sydney Poitier in "They Call Me Mister Tibbs" and with Elvis Presley in "Change of Habit."

 

She hosted television's "The Barbara McNair Show," a musical and comedy program in the late 1960s and early 1970s. As a singer, one of her biggest hits was "You Could Never Love Him."

 

vallo

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During the 1960's Barbara McNair performed regularly at the Playboy Club, and appeared frequently on the once a week Jack Eigan TV talkfest, on local Channel 5. I loved her, but she smoked constantly while on the program. This is not meant as a criticism of her, but back then, and now for that matter, I don't like to see women smoke. Call it snobbery or whatever you will, I just find it a very distasteful habit. That men do distasteful things just goes with territory

 

Message was edited by:

ken123

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I know what you mean Mongo. The only female that made "Smoking" sexy was Lauren Bacall.....

 

vallo

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<<"This is not meant as a criticism of her, but back then, and now for that matter, I don't like to see women smoke. Call it snobbery or whatever you will, I just find it a very distasteful habit. That men do distasteful things just goes with territory">>

 

I could never imagine Bette Davis without a cigarette. Remember when she was interviewed by Barbara Walters and she commented on her smoking? Bette said something like, "I think I will have one NOW." LOL. I love her.

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Hi,

 

I always thought Barbara McNair was so beautiful and such a good singer. She should have been a bigger name, like Dorothy Dandridge or Dihann Carroll or Halle Berry, she certainly had the talent.

I'm sorry she had throat cancer but when you smoke - Yikes.......

 

R.I.P. Barbara.

 

Larry

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Barbara McNair was so beautiful and such a good singer. She should have been a bigger name, like Dorothy Dandridge or Dihann Carroll or Halle Berry, she certainly had the talent.

 

She performed (half-hour or so) for us at either the 2002 or 2003 Western Carolina Film Fair, near Asheville. It was wonderful, and she was so kind in working with a local big band that didn't "quite" have it together. They played well but had no sense of segues from one number to the next. Really fantastic singing, and a little dancing beside.

 

Bill

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Here's another one

 

OBITUARIES

Tige Andrews, 86; Capt. Greer in 'Mod Squad'

 

By Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer

February 3, 2007

 

Tige Andrews, a character actor who earned an Emmy nomination for portraying Capt. Adam Greer, the officer who recruited the undercover cops of television's "The Mod Squad," has died. He was 86.

 

Andrews, who often played detectives during a TV career that spanned five decades, died of cardiac arrest Jan. 27 at his longtime home in Encino, his family said.

 

"Dad was really proud of 'The Mod Squad.' He felt the show made a big difference because it was one of the first television series to address social issues such as drugs, prostitution and teen pregnancy that were more hush-hush before that time," said Barbara Andrews, one of his six children

 

He also loved "working with 'the kids,' " which was how he always referred to the show's young stars ? Clarence Williams III, Michael Cole and Peggy Lipton, his daughter said.

 

Andrews appeared in several episodes of the ABC series that aired from 1968 to 1973.

 

After seeing Andrews in "Mister Roberts" on Broadway, director John Ford cast him in the 1955 film version and at least two other projects.

 

"To us, John Ford was Uncle Plum because Ford loved him and kept giving him more lines here and there," Barbara Andrews said. "He was a huge influence in his life."

 

The actor worked on more than 60 television shows, including a lead role as tough-talking Lt. Russo in "The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor," which aired from 1959 to 1962.

 

Tiger Andrews was born March 19, 1920, in Brooklyn, N.Y. His immigrant parents, following Syrian custom, named him after a strong animal because it was supposed to ensure good health, his family said.

 

When Andrews was 3, his mother, Selma, died and his father, George, later remarried. He grew up in a large family in Middlesex, N.J., where his father ran a fruit stand.

 

During World War II, Andrews served in the Army but returned home after being wounded in Sicily.

 

A former standout in high school plays, he graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City.

 

In an off-Broadway revival of "The Threepenny Opera" that debuted in 1955, he appeared as Streetsinger, an experience his family said he cherished.

 

His wife of 46 years, Norma Thornton, a dancer who appeared regularly on "The Ed Sullivan Show," died in 1996.

 

In addition to his daughter Barbara, Andrews is survived by children John, Gina, Steve, Julianna and Tony; and 11 grandchildren.

 

I know The Mod Squad's Mike Cole, a sweet guy, who feels that Andrews really held the show together, giving it a grounding in believability, and the young stars a role model of benevolent, yet strict, professionalism (something whose value, by Mike's own admission, he, Peggy Lipton and Clarence Williams didn't always appreciate back then).

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[nobr] The wonderfully elegant and sharp-featured actor, Ian Richardson has passed away in London. Classically trained and a former member of the Royal Shakespeare Company, he will be immortal in my memory for his skilled playing of the Machiavellian politico in the parliamentary series seen in the U.S. as House of Cards on Masterpiece Theatre. Look up the word "hauteur" and Mr. Richardson's face should be found there: [/nobr]

IanRichardson.jpg

[nobr]

From the New York Times, February 10th, 2007:[/nobr]

 

Ian Richardson, 72, Versatile Scottish Actor, Dies

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

Ian Richardson, the Scottish film, television and stage actor who was a major figure at the Royal Shakespeare Company before gaining international fame for his television portrayal of a deliciously villainous politician, died yesterday at his home in London. He was 72. [/nobr]

 

His agent, Jean Diamond, said the cause had not yet been determined.[/nobr]

With his sharp features and honeyed accent, Mr. Richardson was almost destined to play the seductive villain Francis Urquhart in the series ?House of Cards? and its two sequels. But he first became known as a versatile stage actor, and as a founding member of the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1960. [/nobr]

 

He made his first impact on the American theater scene as Jean-Paul Marat in Peter Brook?s groundbreaking production of Peter Weiss?s ?Marat/Sade? when it came to Broadway in 1965. Stanley Kauffmann, writing in The New York Times, called his performance ?outstanding.? Mr. Richardson believed the role of the madman playing Marat also made him the first actor to expose his hind parts on a Broadway stage.[/nobr]

 

Mr. Richardson remained with the company for the next decade, winning praise for his portrayals of the two Richards as well as Berowne in ?Love?s Labour?s Lost.? Other roles included Prospero, Angelo and Cassius, the conniving senator for whom Mr. Richardson once said he had a soft spot. In 1974, in the middle of a brief nervous breakdown, Mr. Richardson left the company. Two years later he came to Broadway to play Henry Higgins in a revival of ?My Fair Lady,? for which he won a Tony Award. He also appeared on Broadway in 1981 in Edward Albee?s adaptation of Nabokov?s ?Lolita.?[/nobr]

 

By then he had already been moving to television, playing a double agent in an adaptation of John le Carr??s ?Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy? and Sherlock Holmes in two different television movies. But it was his portrayal of the alluringly evil Francis Urquhart, a scheming, icily sardonic Tory member of Parliament, that finally made him a household name in Britain and a celebrity abroad. The character of Urquhart, whom Mr. Richardson compared to Richard III, was introduced in 1990 in the BBC series ?House of Cards,? an adaptation of a book by Michael Dobbs. Two sequels followed: ?To Play the King? in 1994 and ?The Final Cut? in 1995. By that time, Mr. Richardson, a British superstar, was being described in newspapers as ?the Voice.?[/nobr]

 

Urquhart?s slippery catchphrase, ?You might say that ? I couldn?t possibly comment,? became so popular that both John Major and Tony Blair have reportedly said it jokingly on occasion.[/nobr]

 

Mr. Richardson had recently returned to the stage for several productions. In 2002 he was in an international tour of ?The Hollow Crown,? with Diana Rigg and Derek Jacobi, and in 2005 he starred in a revival of ?The Creeper? on London?s West End. Americans might also know him from commercials, as the man who asked, out of the window of a Rolls-Royce, for Grey Poupon mustard.[/nobr]

 

Ian William Richardson was born on April 7, 1934, in Edinburgh, to a homemaker and a biscuit factory manager. He worked as a radio announcer in Libya for the British National Service, where he first received diction lessons, before going to the Glasgow College of Dramatic Art. At 25, while playing Hamlet at the Birmingham Repertory Theater Company, he was seen by Peter Hall, who asked him to join a troupe he was starting. That troupe became the Royal Shakespeare Company.

During a read-through of ?The Merchant of Venice,? his first production there, Mr. Richardson, who played the Prince of Aragon, was introduced to an actress named Maroussia Frank. They married the next year. In addition to Ms. Frank, Mr. Richardson?s survivors include their two sons, Jeremy and Miles; several grandchildren; and two sisters. To the end, Mr. Richardson was conflicted about the fame Urquhart brought him. ?Beforehand I was an anonymous jobbing actor known only to the cognoscenti,? he said in a 2000 interview with The Scotsman. ?Now, when my wife wants to go to the supermarket, I have to stand at the side entrance, looking furtive in a hat and sunglasses. Is that any way for an actor to have to behave??[/nobr]

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Thank you, songbird2. I just read about this on a Brit board I frequent, wherein they spoke of Helen Mirren winning a BAFTA and giving a tribute to Ian Richardson. And my stomach sank.

 

I adored House Of Cards, and thought Mr. Richardson worthy of hunk status in the best tradition of Warren William. :)

 

His films in the States were of not much consequence, but that is only because he was undervalued.

 

I would have liked to see him take a turn as Holmes, I believe he would have been a worthy successor to Jeremy Brett.

 

I will miss him. Seventy-two is much, much too young.

 

Thank you, Mssrs. Thaw, Brett and Richardson, for adding to my life. Oh, and of course thank you as well, Ms. Hickson.

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I'm sorry to hear about Ian Richardson, who was one of those steady talents we probably take for granted.

 

After having seen him for years playing government officials, professional men and Shakespearean tragic characters, it was a real revelation to see him in an RSC filmed version of "Midsummer Night's Dream" from the 1970s, wherein he played the most sexy Oberon, King of the Fairies, imaginable. And shirtless, too.

 

Wasn't he wicked in "House of Cards," though. He will be missed.

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>

> I would have liked to see him take a turn as Holmes,

> I believe he would have been a worthy successor to

> Jeremy Brett.

> ...

Stoneyburke, a little good news.

Ian Richardson did play Sherlock, 2 times . My Mom was a huge Sherlock/Mystery fan, and I recall these running sometime within the last 5 years, perhaps on Encore, Hallmark, or perhaps A&E even?

http://www.amazon.com/Sherlock-Holmes-Baskervilles-Ian-Richardson/dp/6305609330

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/6305871396/imdb-adbox/

 

Had no idea he had died. But, I sure know every detail of Anna Nichole Smith's death.....

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Thanks, ziggyelman. In looking for info on Ian, I did see mention made of the fact that he played Holmes in the early 1980s, after Tinker Tailer Soldier Spy (which I have never seen). Long before Brett did.

 

Since Richardson did such a good job in Murder Rooms, I would be very interested in seeing him as Holmes. No, A&E never had these as part of their mystery lineup, and now that they are as crappy as AMC, they never will.

 

But thank you for the info, I appreciate it.

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Matte artist extraordinaire, Peter Ellenshaw, has passed away. Before computer generated backgrounds came along, backgrounds were often created with paint and glass and Ellenshaw was the master craftsman. He worked for much of his career at Disney.

 

 

Among his more famous films Stairway to Heaven, Black Narcissus, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Mary Poppins, Treasure Island, Island at the Top of the World, Darby O'Gill and the Little People and many more.

 

Here's his obit from the LA Times:

 

Peter Ellenshaw, 93; Oscar-winning special effects artist for Disney

By Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer

February 15, 2007

 

Peter Ellenshaw, an Academy Award-winning special effects artist who worked on Disney classics such as "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," "Darby O'Gill and the Little People" and "Mary Poppins," for which he won his Oscar, has died. He was 93.

 

Ellenshaw, who also was a renowned sea and landscape artist, died of age-related complications Monday at his home in Santa Barbara, said his son, Harrison.

 

The British-born Ellenshaw's more than 30-year association with Walt Disney Studios began in 1947 when he was hired in London to do matte paintings for Disney's first live-action film, "Treasure Island" (1950).

 

In 1953, he was brought to California to work on "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," for which he created several matte paintings of Capt. Nemo's secret island base of Vulcania.

 

He went on to do matte paintings and other special effects for more than 30 other Disney films, including "The AbsentMinded Professor," "Pollyanna," "Swiss Family Robinson," "The Happiest Millionaire," "The Love Bug" and "The Black Hole." He also did matte paintings for Disney TV fare, such as "Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier," "Zorro" and "Texas John Slaughter."

 

"He's one of the titans of visual effects in an era before people took visual special effects for granted," film critic and historian Leonard Maltin told The Times on Wednesday.

 

Unlike the digital special effects of today, Maltin explained, "a matte painter literally painted on panes of glass that, when suspended properly in front of the camera or double-exposed, give a perfect illusion.

 

"So when you see London Harbor full of tall-masted schooners in 'Treasure Island,' that's an Ellenshaw painting. When Mary Poppins sails over the rooftops of London, that's an Ellenshaw painting. And when Davy Crocket rides down the path to Washington, that's an Ellenshaw painting."

 

Ellenshaw also contributed to the design of several rides at Disneyland and painted the first map of the Magic Kingdom, which appeared on early postcards and souvenir booklets at the Anaheim theme park.

 

"Peter was a Disney legend in every sense of the word and played a vital role in the creation of many of the studio's greatest live-action films from the very beginning," Roy E. Disney, former vice chairman of the Walt Disney Co., said in a statement. "He was a brilliant and innovative visual effects pioneer who was able to consistently please my Uncle Walt and push the boundaries of the medium to fantastic new heights."

 

Born in London on May 24, 1913, Ellenshaw moved to Essex, England, with his parents and two sisters during World War I, when he was 3. He later recalled seeing German zeppelins in the sky.

 

"My mother put us under the kitchen table while they were overhead and gave us pencils and paper to draw with," he recalled in a 1980 interview with The Times. "After the age of 4, I learned to draw airplanes; in fact, that got me interested in art."

 

His father died while Ellenshaw was still young and his mother married a gardener who worked on an estate. To help support the family, Ellenshaw dropped out of school at 14 and spent the next six years working on cars in a garage while continuing to paint.

 

By then living in the small town of Oxbridge, near the London film studios, he became friends with renowned matte artist Walter Percy Day, who eventually offered him a job. From 1935 to 1941, Ellenshaw worked as an uncredited assistant matte artist on a dozen films, including "The Thief of Bagdad" and "Major Barbara."

 

Ellenshaw served in the Royal Air Force during World War II, and then worked as a matte artist on "Black Narcissus," "Stairway to Heaven," "Quo Vadis" and other films.

 

After doing special effects and the production design on the 1974 Disney adventure-fantasy "The Island at the Top of the World" ? for which he shared an Oscar nomination for best art direction ? Ellenshaw and his wife moved to Ireland, where he painted landscapes for a couple of years before returning to California.

 

From then on, he did only occasional film work, including the 1979 Disney space adventure "The Black Hole," for which he shared an Oscar nomination for best visual effects.

 

Ellenshaw, who also shared an Oscar nomination for art direction for the 1971 film "Bedknobs and Broomsticks," came out of retirement for the last time to do matte paintings for the 1990 film "Dick Tracy."

 

Bobbie, Ellenshaw's wife of 58 years, died in 2000. In addition to his son Harrison, who is a visual effects artist, Ellenshaw is survived by his daughter, Lynda Ellenshaw Thompson, a visual effects producer, and two grandchildren.

 

Funeral services will be private. Instead of flowers, donations may be made to Direct Relief International, 27 S. La Patera Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93117.

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Heigh-ho, the Pale Rider continues to gaze coldly on both the gentle and the hard, showing little understanding that this sorry world needs more people who can appreciate life. The announcement of the death of Sheridan Morley reminds me that his gifted, generous writing in newspapers and books about such legendary figures as Audrey Hepburn, Noel Coward, John Gielgud, James Mason and the British colony in Hollywood's golden era was always tinged with kindness, as well as keen insight.

 

One of the several books that he wrote, Tales From the Hollywood Raj; The British, The Movies and Tinseltown, remains a personal favorite and an entertaining guide to the sometimes ersatz depictions of the English at home and abroad. Mr. Morley came by his intimate knowledge of the lives and times of such folk quite legitimately--he was the son of actor Robert Morley and grandson of legendary beauty and Hollywood character actress par excellence, Gladys Cooper. This background may have also blessed him with a healthy lack of awe about the famous and the talented. If you're moved to seek out any of his books, you will be entertained and informed in his company. The New York Times published the obituary that appears below for Mr. Morley:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

February 19, 2007

Sheridan Morley, British Theater Critic and Biographer, Dies at 65

By Benedict Nightingale

 

Sheridan Morley, the prominent British critic, biographer and broadcaster who devoted his career to chronicling and, often, celebrating plays and players, died on Friday at his home in London. He was 65.

 

The cause has not yet been determined, but his death was widely reported in the British press. A lifelong lover of the theater, Mr. Morley came from thoroughbred theatrical stock. The actor Robert Morley was his father, the actress Gladys Cooper was his maternal grandmother, the actor Robert Hardy was his uncle by marriage. His godfather and the subject of his finest biography, ?A Talent to Amuse,? (1969) was No?l Coward.

 

Sheridan Morley was born on Dec. 5, 1941, the day his father opened as Sheridan Whiteside, the grotesquely self-absorbed critic, based on Alexander Woolcott, in the West End production of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart?s comedy ?The Man Who Came to Dinner.? It was this, along with Robert Morley?s admiration for the dramatist Richard Brinsley Sheridan, that explained his unconventional first name, which Mr. Morley preferred to hear reduced to Sherry.

 

A large, ebullient figure, Mr. Morley was more introverted than his father, whom he resembled physically. His childhood, like his name, was unconventional, much of it dictated by his father?s work and enlivened by encounters with the famous. He spent time both in Hollywood, where he recalled witnessing cricket matches between expatriate British actors and watching Greta Garbo help wash the dishes after a game, and New York, where his father starred in his own play, ?Edward, My Son,? in 1948. But at age 9 Sheridan was sent to a progressive co-educational boarding school in England, spending his holidays wherever Robert Morley was filming.

 

He eventually proved a good enough scholar to secure a place at Merton College, Oxford, where he became active in undergraduate theater, which was flourishing. At Oxford he first met Ruth Leon, who became his second wife in 1995. But it was during a year teaching at the University of Hawaii that he met his first wife, the Boston-born Margaret Gudejko, to whom he was married from 1965 to 1990; the marriage ended in divorce. Ms. Leon, a critic and writer, survives, along with a son and two daughters from his first marriage.

 

After his year in Hawaii, Mr. Morley, always a confident, articulate speaker, became a late-night newscaster and commentator on British independent television. (He covered the lying-in-state of Winston Churchill in 1965.) He later moved to the BBC, where he was featured on the magazine program ?Late Night Line-Up.?

 

In the 1960s, he also became active as an arts writer, contributing reviews, articles and interviews to The Times of London, among other publications. Something of a workaholic, he continued to combine journalism with a career on radio and television. (He once suggested in an interview with Margaret Thatcher that Britain was a great place ?if you are neither very poor nor black,? and got the immortal answer, ?Well, I?m not, am I??)

 

He became deputy features editor and then television critic of The Times and, in 1975, arts editor and theater critic of the humor magazine Punch, a position he held until its demise in 1992. He also wrote theater reviews from London for The International Herald Tribune and regular articles for the American program-magazine Playbill.

 

In recent years, he was successively drama critic for The Spectator, The New Statesman and The Daily Express while trying to build a another career, within the theater. In 1983 he devised and staged a revue, ?No?l and Gertie,? about No?l Coward and Gertrude Lawrence, which ran for nine months in the West End; in 1999 he scored a substantial critical success by directing Corin Redgrave in Coward?s seldom-performed ?Song at Twilight,? again in the West End.

 

Aside from Coward, his subjects as a biographer included Gertrude Lawrence, Marlene Dietrich, both Katharine and Audrey Hepburn, David Niven, James Mason, his own father, and John Gielgud. He held the authorized Gielgud biography until after the actor?s death, in 2000, to avoid running into Gielgud?s unease at seeing references to his homosexuality in print.

 

It was characteristic of Mr. Morley that this book was packed not only with judicious assessments of Gielgud?s art ? with also with stories of his famous eccentricities. In life as well as in print, genially reminiscing about the theater and jovially sharing theatrical anecdotes was just what Mr. Morley liked best.

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