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Why no Labor Day Movies?


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The trailer said...One single continuous shot.  :huh:

 

It is claimed no editing at all?  Now c'mon, no actor / actress is THAT perfect. The director didn't yell CUT once?  Somebody is bragging.

 

Seen it before but forgot most of it.

 

 

It is one continuous shot.

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Not familiar with it.  But, if it follows the same storyline, then why not?

 

It does:  It was all the "restored" version (90 minutes) they had in 1984, back when nitrate film preservation was literally only just beginning--

Giorgio funded the restoration and did the (very good) 80's-synth soundtrack, but in trying to sell a silent film to 80's audiences, came up with the idea of persuading young people that wild abstract German-expressionist silent movies with music and no dialogue were "Sort of like MTV music videos"...And ended up writing eight songs for Pat Benatar, Freddie Mercury and other 80's-stars to Greek-chorus the onscreen action, and turned the complete film soundtrack into "Metropolis: the Rock-Video Musical".

It's also BETTER than the Ultimate Restored version, that bends your ear off with Lang's Weimar-era pro-union propaganda.  As one critic put it, "There's the version of Metropolis that's 'good for you', and then there's the one you actually enjoy."

 

(The whole thing's also on YouTube somewhere, if you can't find the Kino Lorber disk.  Yes, the Moroder version, not Kino's three or four existing restorations.)

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like I sad...

 

slackers!

 

the tcm wine club must be their single thought now. personally, I doan drink but I think I would like a carbonated raspberry sparkler.

 

:)

 

 

You mean the Grapes of Wrath Raspberry Sparkler.

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I may be in the minority, but I view On the Waterfront (1954) as anti-worker.

 

Yea,  having a mob-run union (especially one that has no problem with killing off their own members) certainly isn't pro-union and therefor could be viewed as anti-worker.

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It's also BETTER than the Ultimate Restored version, that bends your ear off with Lang's Weimar-era pro-union propaganda.  As one critic put it, "There's the version of Metropolis that's 'good for you', and then there's the one you actually enjoy."

 

 

I don't mind pro-union propaganda.  If it gets too thick, well, that's just a flaw in the movie.  Anyway, at the end of the movie, labor and management reconcile.  It's theme is one of the finest sentiments:

 

The mediator between the head and the hands must be the heart!

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I don't mind pro-union propaganda.  If it gets too thick, well, that's just a flaw in the movie.  Anyway, at the end of the movie, labor and management reconcile.  It's theme is one of the finest sentiments:

 

The mediator between the head and the hands must be the heart!

 

I have both versions of Metropolis too.  The 1984 Giorgio Moroder-produced version sounds much like early 80s music, because he (together with Harold Faltermeyer) produced much of the early 80s electronic hits in Germany, making extensive use of Moog and Mini-Moog synthesizers.  The sound is apparent on select songs from Top Gun (Berlin- Take My Breath Away), the theme to Fletch, the theme to Flashdance (Irene Cara - What A Feeling), and Midnight Express as well as working with Donna Summer.

 

In this picture is Moroder seated at a full Moog synthesizer, and in the far left you see a little bit of his Mini-Moog (a highly scaled down version of the Moog created for concert touring)

Giorgio+Moroder.jpg

 

So it is no surprise that the Metropolis soundtrack is going to be along these lines.  Personally I love it.

 

The 1984 version itself is short, it is like a flyover compared to the full version.  There is one character who is not included, a "thin man".  No big loss.  Also missing is the back story on one of the characters.  The main theme is still there, albeit with certain parts of the story unexplained or not elaborated on in depth.

 

The sequence of the editing is fixed in the long version.  For the first time, they had a non-edited version to use as an example of the complete work.  It was a 16mm copy, so there were a few points in the fully restored version where 16mm patches were the only choice.

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A labour day movie?

 

How about Rosemary's Baby?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorry. The Devil made me say it.

 

Tom, you have no idea how many times since slayton started this baby, I started to post something along these lines myself(minus of course that superfluous-'u' that you included in your post) and then thought the better of it before hitting that enter button.

 

(...bottom line here?...I can't believe that for once I had more self-control than you, ol' buddy!) ;)

 

LOL

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Tom, you have no idea how many times since slayton started this baby, I started to post something along these lines myself(minus of course that superfluous-'u' that you included in your post) and then thought the better of it before hitting that enter button.

 

(...bottom line here?...I can't believe that for once I had more self-control than you, ol' buddy!) ;)

 

LOL

 

Congratulations, Dargo.

 

Unfortunately, my self control is out of whack.

 

Perhaps I should start attending Bad Jokesters Anonymous meetings.

 

 

 

Err . . . having just seen Movie Madness's comment now, he might do with a class or two himself.

 

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As one who hails from a long line of labor union organizers and members, and a 40+ year U.A.W. member myself,  I'd appreciate if any anti union statements, usually based on total ignorance of the history of labor/management relations in this country, be kept  to a minimum, please.

 

And since much of the movie does focus on WOODY GUTHRIE'S involvement in union organization, BOUND FOR GLORY might be another good choice.

 

 

Sepiatone

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On that note, has anyone here seen Last Exit to Brooklyn (1989), based on the novel by the same author as Requiem for a Dream?

I never see any mention of it in discussion boards.

 

It's a fine movie, I and others mentioned it in the "Favorite Performances" thread.

 

Joe Hill (1971) is a noble attempt to make a film about one of the great union organizers:

 

 

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Congratulations, Dargo.

 

Unfortunately, my self control is out of whack.

 

Perhaps I should start attending Bad Jokesters Anonymous meetings.

 

 

 

Err . . . having just seen Movie Madness's comment now, he might do with a class or two himself.

 

 

HEY, not a bad idea, Tom.

 

Maybe the three of us could attend those classes together?!

 

(...with MM of course sitting way off to the right of us and where he'd feel the most comfortable!)

 

LOL

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HEY, not a bad idea, Tom.

 

Maybe the three of us could attend those classes together?!

 

(...with MM of course sitting way off to the right of us and where he'd feel the most comfortable!)

 

LOL

 

Yup, I can see us all at Bad Jokesters Anoymous now, Dargo.

 

You'd be telling them how you don't want to be at any anonymous meeting that would have you as a member.

 

Movie Madness would say, "Why was Barack Obama at the golf club? Because the way he swung his club everyone there would have to file for Obamacare before it self destructed."

 

And then I would stand up.

 

"Hello, everybody. My name's Jimmy-Crack-Corn And-I-Don't-Care (also known to my southern Baptist friends as Jimmy Datoldtimereligion), and I'm a bad jokester.

 

Why did the chicken cross the street? I don't know but it sure was a break for Road Kill Cafe just down the road."

 

Of course, it also helps to have the right face when you tell jokes this bad. This one is perfect:

 

373985-zelda.png

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I may be in the minority, but I view On the Waterfront (1954) as anti-worker.

..But it's still a film about workers, darn hard workers, and their struggles. That's all I meant by my recommendation. Perhaps it is I who is in the minority.

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I may be in the minority, but I view On the Waterfront (1954) as anti-worker.

 

Yeah, that might be true, slayton.

 

However, I'VE always looked at On the Waterfront as being a little more "pro-Lee J. Cobb chewing the scenery again"!

 

(...heck dude, he even makes Rob Steiger's performance seem "understated" in this baby...and THAT'S some feat!)

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..But it's still a film about workers, darn hard workers, and their struggles. That's all I meant by my recommendation. Perhaps it is I who is in the minority.

 

 

No, you're not in the minority.  The performances of Marlon Brando, Lee J. Cobb, and Rod Steiger, and the eye-opening way the movie was done obscure the underlying message against labor organizing to promote its interests.  That's why I don't think it's an appropriate movie for Labor Day.

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I'VE always looked at On the Waterfront as being a little more "pro-Lee J. Cobb chewing the scenery again"!

 

(...heck dude, he even makes Rob Steiger's performance seem "understated" in this baby...and THAT'S some feat!)

 

Waterfront_118Pyxurz.jpg

 

"Oh yeah, wiseguy? Well you look like another guy who needs a good sock in the nose!"

 

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No, you're not in the minority.  The performances of Marlon Brando, Lee J. Cobb, and Rod Steiger, and the eye-opening way the movie was done obscure the underlying message against labor organizing to promote its interests.  That's why I don't think it's an appropriate movie for Labor Day.

 

Kinda missed the "message" there a bit.

 

Wasn't necessarily an "anti-labor" movie, but an expose of organized crime  and it's encroachment into labor unions in order to promote THEIR interests, not really the union's.  And the mob's involment assuring financial benefits and job security for the MOB and not the workers.

 

So, it still works as an appropriate Labor Day movie for me too.

 

 

Sepiatone

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