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Someone who's job is to time the films corectly keeps screwing up!!!!!


ziggyelman
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Wheeler and Woosley film Kentucky Kernels was on early today, and was supposed to fit in a 1:15 slot, but it sure didn't!!! Last 2 minutes cut off,....at least I could see the ending since I recorded the Nitwits afterwards as well.

Honestly, I know no one is perfect, but this happens too often. I know one of William Wellman pre codes was cut off, as was Age of Consent (It was a restored version so that makes some sense) Shouldn't it be the job of someone at TCM to make sure there is enough time in each block for the film scheduled??? It really doens't make sense happening in the AM. I can see having Robert talk before and after would throw times off, but why now????

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With 15-minute scheduling blocks, they can't always be perfect. That 75-minute movie was scheduled for a 75-minute slot, so chances were good that it would run over. After checking the film length, I program five minutes prior to start, ten minutes after, no matter the official start time. Haven't missed any beginnings or endings in over eighteen months now. I don't have a DVR, but I can't imagine that you can't program those things manually rather than just punching in a title.

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Give thanks that TCM is not run like our airports as far as timing schedules go. I always place a 5 min head start and ending time whenever I am away just in case. If I am recording when I am at home then its about 2 min (for editing).

 

I like to edit out commercials when I am recording - a little tricky but can be done if one knows the stations habits like TNT and AMC. TCM has no commercials but an annoying "anti pirating" - (what a joke) station icon at the bottom right. That bugs me more then timing.

 

HBO, Starz, etc are great at timing their shows.

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I understand the problem, I think I would leave the timers alone if two shows/movies are back to back, and let it shout off and restart on its own, You then can edit the tail end of the first on on to the end of its movie when you recored it to dvd later, just pause the dvd recorder and cue up the next movie when the tail of the 1st movie starts unpause the dvd recorder and finish recording the last couple -3 minutes.. and your done... That clear as mudd....? ....lol

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No to me - strange, I've been recording since the early 1980's and never recorded 2 movies back to back. Never thought of that.

 

I have no plans to get a DVR but hoping to get (when my present DVD goes out) a DVD recorder with a built in hard drive. It can actually serve as a DVR.

 

I don't bother worrying about missing a few minutes if someones at the door. Anyone who NEEDS to PAUSE live TV needs a life !

 

No offense to DVR lovers intended.

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I can understand how you might feel that having a dvr is a bit excessive, What a dvr is essentially a hard drive that records what you tell it to and aves it so you can watch it when you want. for millions of folks having a dvr allows them to watch what they want to watch when they are are home and have the time to watch, they can watch what they want without having to worry about being around when the show airs, As far a pausing live tv, that is a minor ,but very hand feature, I use the pause mostly for the phone, when the phone rings I can pause the tv and talk on the phone and deal with customers as long as I need to in quiet. My other favorite feature is auto tune, Say theres somethings coming on at a cartion time every day and you know you want to to at least have it on you can set it up to auto tune to that show every day with out your remembering to change the channel,

Many of the movies that I have recorded to dvd spent time on my dvr before I had time to play them and record them to dvd, it also makes much easier to go in edit out comericails, or in the case of PBS pledge breaks, I have mine set up to auto- tune and tune on every morning at 6:30 am it tunes in my favorite music station off the satilete,

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You probually got a lot more to watch then I have. In the past year, I only recorded about only 4 feature length movies. Most of my viewing is the news, Jay Leno, History - Science Channel (and the like). Few networks like CSI. TCM on weekends if somethings on.

 

Most of them repeat every 3 hours or so and because I got both the east and west coast NBC. CBS, etc. they are also repeated. My viewing is The Peoples Court and the news in the morning and the rest at 10:00 pm - 2:00am. That's about it.

 

Now unfortunately because of the writers strike virtually eveything is a rerun.

That strike might make a good thread for those that are bored by reruns.

 

So you can see a DVR is almost useless to me and would probually wind up being a paper weight.

 

Right now, 300 channels and nothings on !

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I have the 250 package which gives me more then I can watch even if I wanted to, I don't do the sports, news and shopping channels once in a while if the weather is really bad, I watch the weather channel. I watch a lot of th history and Hgtv, diy, fine living and the like, most of the stuff I watch is not new, so I guess it don't count,...lol Of course I have the locals, which I don't watch, So I collect movies and stuff of PBS and I like almost anything that involves concerts, and behind the senses of music production If nothing elses is on I can turn on the musi statio, usually 968 smooth jazz, best part of that is no comericals and announcers,, just good music... Having the pvr gives me the flexibility to save a bunch of esposiodes of a show and put them all on one disc and save them.. all my audio runs through my sourond sound system so it sounds good..

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I watch very little of TCM "live" as I prefer to watch at more convenient times. (I am a "geezer" so my viewing hours are not the same as those of the youngsters in our midst.)

 

There have been earlier discussions (in several threads) concerning "tight programming."

 

It is only necessary to avail oneself of resources to-hand: Now Playing and, as the day approaches, the schedule posted on this website. From these resources one may find confirmation of, and/or adjustments to, the "final schedule."

 

Be sure to notice "tight programming" (i.e., running times within allocated scheduling blocks) so that you may set (or reset) your time shifting device to record that which you wish to see.

 

Often, I have set my Panasonic DVD recorders with "buffer time" and/or "blocks" of adjacent programming in order to avoid cutting off endings of "tightly scheduled" movies (and shorts). Where movies are tightly scheduled I "bulk" record two or more movies as a single recording. With two of my recorders enslaved to my digital cable box (one connected to the coaxial cable and the other to the RCA yellow, white and red jacks) I generally overlap the ending and beginning times where one recorder transitions to the other recorder in the next programming block.

 

My advice is to plan ahead. Let me say this again, PLAN AHEAD!

 

At the moment I have the next five days pre-programmed into the Panasonics. Sometimes I have pre-programmed a week or more in advance. Each Panasonic programs sixteen pre-scheduled recordings. This pre-scheduled programming may be revised as there are programming or schedule adjustments or where interesting shorts appear in the online schedules.

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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I have a question, you said you have two dvd recorders, one hooked to the coaxial cable, one to the RCAs do you get a noticeably better picture from or the other, or are the pictures on the dvd about the same, when your all done and finalized, I just wondered is all, I have my dvd recorder hooked up to the RCAs off the back of my sat receiver,

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Ken,

 

Most of my time-shifting is of early talkies through the film noir era.

 

I have found the picture quality of finalized DVDs to be very nearly the same, perhaps somewhat better with a coaxial connection. Of course, the quality difference may be from performance variables between the two Panasonic DVD combo recorders connected to the Comcast digital cable box. The coaxial connection is to a Panasonic DMR-ES35V (a 2006 model) and the RCA connections are to a DMR-ES30V (a 2005 model). Both DVD combo recorders have had heavy use since new. (The DMR-ES30V had its DVD drive replaced under warranty by Panasonic after eleven months' use.)

 

When watching the "live" feed I notice a louder volume on the "RCA" feed to the DMR-ES30V than that from the coaxial feed to the DMR-ES35V. Both DVD recorder signals are fed to a Westinghouse 27" widescreen LCD HDTV through the component RGB connection. The DMR-ES35V serves as the "master" connection. (The DMR-ES30V output is currently connected to RCA input 1 on the DMR-ES35V.)

 

I have other Panasonics set up for dubbing or for "standby" use, including another DMR-ES30V, three other DMR-ES35V, and DMR-ES15 and DMR-EZ17 models (the last two models are DVD recorders without VHS sections). The DMR-EZ17 (a 2007 model) has analog and digital tuning (up to the 135 channel range); the others have analog tuners. Our Comcast service places TCM on channel 501.

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You may be an old geezer, but you are certainly more technologically adept than I. I still use video tape and when I program it, I allow for a few minutes before and after the scheduled times.

 

I admire your use of DVD recorders. I didn't even know that they were available at a reasonable price.

Obviously, you put blank videos in, just like videotapes, but are the DVDS reusable like tapes?

 

Thanks.

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Simply put:

 

There are two basic kinds of blank DVD's...ok..three...but basically two :

 

There are DVD +/- R blanks - These are basically one time use blanks which need to be

'finalized' to be played in most players other than the unit they were recorded on. If you have recorded a 1 hour program, then erase it, that space on the disc is basically unusable. These are cheap as dirt, and getting cheaper every day. There is no real difference as far as I can see between DVDR and DVD-Rformats, although the DVD R is a tad newer and finalizes a bit faster I think...

 

Then there are DVD RW blanks. THESE blanks can be recorded on, then erased with the original space being available after erasing. Most of the time, these are playable in most newer DVD players without 'finalizing' - however some older units will not recognize the format. The DVD RWs are closest to a regular VHS tape as far as flexibility is concerned. I think each disc can be recorded over about 1000 times!

 

It is important to note all DVD players do tell you which formats they will support for recording and playing!

 

Personally, I have a Philips 160 GB HDD recorder with a DVD burner built in. The HDD recorder has very nice editing features, so when recording TCM, I always check the movie run time, and then record about 10 minutes after. I have yet to lose the end of ANY film from TCM. This unit burns VERY good DVDs that have played in some very 'old' DVD players when finalized. The nice thing about this unit is that one can be burning a DVD, and still watch TV through the hard drive.

 

Message was edited by: exapno

 

Message was edited by: exapno

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Almost forgot - My HDD recorder is connected to my cable box with the standard RCA R/L connectors for audio, and the 6 pin S-video jack for video, and with the same for audio/video outs.

 

Actually my 'outs' go through a multiswitch connector to which my Panasonic DVD multi disc player is also connected.

 

more on the cable thing later.....

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222characteractor,

 

To Expano's posts I would add that certain name brands of media (TDK, Maxell, Verbatim) function better than others (Memorex, and "store" brands). I have settled upon DVD-R as the most compatible, reliable and inexpensive blank media. I watch the Sunday papers for sale prices at office supply and chain stores. Name brand DVD-R media spindles of 100 are usually priced less than $25.00.

 

With my Panasonics I generally put four to six hours of black and white programming on a disc. With color movies I generally use the four hour per DVD speed. Panasonics may also be set to record up to eight hours per DVD.

 

At less than twenty five cents per blank disc, DVD recording is much less expensive than videotape and takes up very little space. After dubbing to DVD selected portions of my home-recorded videotapes (from the 1986-2005 period) I have recently disposed of nearly 1,800 videotapes. My whole home-recorded DVD archive (placed in book-type albums) now occupies less than five linear feet of shelf space.

 

You may find some of the discussions in this thread interesting:

 

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=101421&tstart=45

 

TalkieTime

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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