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LawrenceA

December Schedule Is Up

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The Albert Brooks doubling as director and star two-fer is certainly deserved, though they are going with his two earliest career efforts in that area, I think. However, though I've read extensively about both of these films, I've never actually checked them out, so I'm planning to. However, I certainly wouldn't have minded seeing the theme expanded beyond those two films: I love Lost in America, which hasn't aired on TCM for three years now. And, since they show so many Debbie Reynolds movies, I wish TCM could get the rights to Mother, which I think is her final big-screen appearance?

Debbie Reynolds made a few more films after Mother, but never again with such a central role. She was the soul of that film, and gave some of her very best work in it.

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I've only looked at the first two weeks of the schedule. Are they showing The Big Cube as part of Lana Turner's SOTM showcase?

 

Edit: Yep, found it finally. At 4:15 am ET the morning of Dec. 27. Set your alarm clocks!

 

I just saw that The Big Cube is showing Thursday night at 11:00pm (PST).  It's scheduled as part of the counter culture series. 

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The Big Cube is an example of how late 1960s-early 1970s Hollywood turned on its glamorous stars of the earlier era with disrespect.

 

While not the Hag films per se, Lana, Jennifer, Eleanor Parker, Veronica Lake and others were flippantly and openly mistreated during this dark period..

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I'm disappointed that Lana Turner is SOTM. She is just so bland to me. In her early MGMs she just went around looking doe-eyed and beautiful, and as she aged she just got this hard edge to her performances that did not interest me.

 

I realize TCM usually picks crowd pleasers for December SOTM whose catalog of films they largely have in their library already. Past December choices have been  William Powell, Mickey Rooney, and Barbara Stanwyck, for example. I realize that Lana fits that bill with so much of her career being at MGM,  but except for a few rarities I may not have seen I'm going to sit these pics out.

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I always look forward to the December schedule because it's a lot of fun to see which Christmas movies TCM will be showing.

 

This year, they're showing a lot of the classics I love -- everything from various versions of A Christmas Carol and Little Women, to Christmas in ConnecticutThe Man Who Came To Dinner, Lady in the Lake, Love Finds Andy Hardy, Fitzwilly, The Bishop's Wife, On Moonlight Bay, Remember the Night, and short Star In The Night, to name just several among many others.  There don't seem to be any interesting themes, however (a la "Noir Christmas" from a few years ago, the idea for which originated on this message board).  Most of the Christmas-themed programming looked like pretty standard holiday fare -- very good movies but nothing surprising.

 

Until I got to Christmas Eve.  Just after midnight, as part of about 36 straight hours of Christmas-related movies, TCM will be showing The Cheaters (1945), for only the second time that I'm aware of.  It's a wonderful movie about how a spendthrift formerly rich family that's almost broke is redeemed by an alcoholic actor whom they've taken in as a "charity case" for the holiday -- although he actually gives them more than they can ever give him.  It stars Joseph Schildkraut, Billie Burke, and Eugene Pallette.  

 

I was so glad that I recorded it the first time TCM showed it several years ago.  My wife and I (along with any visiting family members) have watched The Cheaters almost every year since then.  Just as Remember the Night was recently re-discovered as a Christmas classic, The Cheaters also deserves that kind of attention.

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I'm disappointed that Lana Turner is SOTM. She is just so bland to me. In her early MGMs she just went around looking doe-eyed and beautiful, and as she aged she just got this hard edge to her performances that did not interest me.

 

I realize TCM usually picks crowd pleasers for December SOTM whose catalog of films they largely have in their library already. Past December choices have been  William Powell, Mickey Rooney, and Barbara Stanwyck, for example. I realize that Lana fits that bill with so much of her career being at MGM,  but except for a few rarities I may not have seen I'm going to sit these pics out.

 

 

This is what, her third time as SOTM? I guess they want someone inexpensive (as far as film rentals go) as Dec. isnt a high viewing month......

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The Big Cube is an example of how late 1960s-early 1970s Hollywood turned on its glamorous stars of the earlier era with disrespect.

 

While not the Hag films per se, Lana, Jennifer, Eleanor Parker, Veronica Lake and others were flippantly and openly mistreated during this dark period..

 

Lana is at least glamorous in this. But it's pretty boring........

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The Big Cube is an example of how late 1960s-early 1970s Hollywood turned on its glamorous stars of the earlier era with disrespect.

 

While not the Hag films per se, Lana, Jennifer, Eleanor Parker, Veronica Lake and others were flippantly and openly mistreated during this dark period..

 

This wasn't the studio-era where actors were under contract with a studio and if they refused to play a part were placed on suspension,  receiving zero pay.   

 

Instead actors were offered parts,  they accepted these parts and were paid for their work.    How is that mistreatment?

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I'm disappointed that Lana Turner is SOTM. She is just so bland to me. In her early MGMs she just went around looking doe-eyed and beautiful, and as she aged she just got this hard edge to her performances that did not interest me.

 

I realize TCM usually picks crowd pleasers for December SOTM whose catalog of films they largely have in their library already. Past December choices have been  William Powell, Mickey Rooney, and Barbara Stanwyck, for example. I realize that Lana fits that bill with so much of her career being at MGM,  but except for a few rarities I may not have seen I'm going to sit these pics out.

 

I agree about Lana Turner's blandness. She seems like "generic pretty blonde woman" to me.  I kind of like her hard edge performances, they at least make her more interesting.  I know Lana is considered one of the great beauties of her era, but personally, I don't think she's anything special. 

 

I understand this was the Backlot selection, the other choice was Lucille Ball.  I would have chosen Lucy.  1) Because I love Lucy and 2) because Lucy has a wider variety of types of films, and personally, I find her more interesting.  Lucy deserved to be a bigger movie star than she became.  Although, perhaps it's just as well, because if she'd become a big movie star, she may have never become a big TV star. 

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I'd forgotten about the Backlot. So that's why Lana got it.

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15 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

I checked out the listing and at first I believed many of these 'pre-code' films were not, as I view what defines a 'pre-code' film.

Yea, they were all made and released prior to the Production code being enforced in July 1934,  but to me a film has to have pre-code themes or scenes.    BUT what a great website!   They have ' Proof That It’s Pre-Code' and this gives the reason they classify the film as a pre-code film.    

Wow,  even if I don't always agree with that 'proof' it is interesting and the site provides a lot of info about each film.

So thanks a million for exposing me to this pre-code site.   It was as nice as seeing Joan Blondell get undressed for no reason than,  well,  seeing Joan get undressed (solid proof that it's a pre-code!).

 

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4 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I checked out the listing and at first I believed many of these 'pre-code' films were not, as I view what defines a 'pre-code' film.

Yea, they were all made and released prior to the Production code being enforced in July 1934,  but to me a film has to have pre-code themes or scenes.    BUT what a great website!   They have ' Proof That It’s Pre-Code' and this gives the reason they classify the film as a pre-code film.    

Wow,  even if I don't always agree with that 'proof' it is interesting and the site provides a lot of info about each film.

So thanks a million for exposing me to this pre-code site.   It was as nice as seeing Joan Blondell get undressed for no reason than,  well,  seeing Joan get undressed (solid proof that it's a pre-code!).

 

I've always thought "pre-code" is a lot of hype.  If you look at the boxes for the DVD sets or pre-code movies, it looks and sounds almost like soft core porn.  Then if you look at TV ratings, they are classified as PG, if not G.

I know you have to accept a lot of innuendo, etc., but still...

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One of my favorite movies will be showing Tuesday Dec 26, Bachelor in Paradise with Turner and Bob Hope.

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26 minutes ago, TheCid said:

OK, who are they and what movie are they in?

I assume you're joking but I'll answer for those that might not know:  This is from the 1933 Little Women and the actresses from left to right are Joan Bennett, Jean Parker, Kate Hepburn and Frances Dee.  

As for pre-code being hype;   of course when hawking product (like noir films), there is a degree of hype and many will market almost any talking film released prior to Code enforcement as pre-code.   E.g. I don't view Little Women as pre-code. 

But there is a degree of open sexually (both visual and the dialog) and more graphic violence, that one just doesn't find in post-Production code films.     Film like Red Headed Women and Baby Face where the lead female character is clearly sleeping her way to the top or Public Enemy or Little Caesar with the multiple shooting and violence. 

 

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51 minutes ago, TheCid said:

I've always thought "pre-code" is a lot of hype.  If you look at the boxes for the DVD sets or pre-code movies, it looks and sounds almost like soft core porn.  Then if you look at TV ratings, they are classified as PG, if not G.

I know you have to accept a lot of innuendo, etc., but still...

Yes, I think people like the sex (racy) part of them. And that's how they are marketed. 

I always get a kick out of people who abhor post-code films, complaining about the sex and violence, but a lot of these same people embrace precodes-- as if nudity and gunfire was somehow better in 1933.

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On ‎9‎/‎21‎/‎2017 at 9:37 PM, speedracer5 said:

I'm indifferent to Lana Turner.  I don't dislike her, but I don't go out of my way to watch her.  I did like her in The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Bad and the Beautiful, and Imitation of Life.  

 

 

 

 

That's pretty much how I feel about Turner as well. Postman and The Bad and the Beautiful are really the only starring roles of hers that made much of an impression on me.

 

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39 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

That's pretty much how I feel about Turner as well. Postman and The Bad and the Beautiful are really the only starring roles of hers that made much of an impression on me.

 

Postman and TBATB are here best films and best performances but I also like her in Johnny Eager, an early noir with Robert Taylor and Van Heflin (won Oscar for best supporting),  and A Life of Her Own with Ann Dvorak giving the best performances in the film (but her on screen time is limited) and Ray Milland.    The Three Musketeers is a very good movie,  but Lana is rather flat in this film (I find all the actresses to be), but the male leads,  Gene Kelly, Heflin, and and Vincent Price carry this adventure film.

While I'm partial to brunettes but I do find Turner to be very attractive.   Her first appearance in Postman is one of the most classic entrances of an actress of all time. 

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2 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

That's pretty much how I feel about Turner as well. Postman and The Bad and the Beautiful are really the only starring roles of hers that made much of an impression on me.

 

She must have left an impression on Red Skelton (or his songwriter in Du Barry Was A Lady)...

"If Lana Turner doesn't set you in a whirl, then you don't love a lovely girl."

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3 minutes ago, limey said:

She must have left an impression on Red Skelton (or his songwriter in Du Barry Was A Lady)...

"If Lana Turner doesn't set you in a whirl, then you don't love a lovely girl.

Obviously Red or the songwriter never heard that song "If you wanna be happy for the rest of your life, never make a pretty woman your wife...." LOL.

Which poor Nick (Cecil Kellaway) in The Postman Always Rings Twice probably would have been better off heeding this bit of wisdom if he had known his sweet young thing of a wife was going to throw him over for John Garfield.

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If you're looking for soft porn in pre-codes you're watching for the wrong reason.....the aspect people enjoy is how clever the sexual or drug references can be without putting it right in the viewer's face. It's the reason Mae West is so beloved: the creative cleverness of her wordplay.

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On 9/26/2017 at 3:59 PM, BingFan said:

Until I got to Christmas Eve.  Just after midnight, as part of about 36 straight hours of Christmas-related movies, TCM will be showing The Cheaters (1945), for only the second time that I'm aware of.  It's a wonderful movie about how a spendthrift formerly rich family that's almost broke is redeemed by an alcoholic actor whom they've taken in as a "charity case" for the holiday -- although he actually gives them more than they can ever give him.  It stars Joseph Schildkraut, Billie Burke, and Eugene Pallette.  

 

I was so glad that I recorded it the first time TCM showed it several years ago.  My wife and I (along with any visiting family members) have watched The Cheaters almost every year since then.  Just as Remember the Night was recently re-discovered as a Christmas classic, The Cheaters also deserves that kind of attention.

I believe you're correct, BingFan, that this will only be the second broadcast of The Cheaters, a charming film with a lovely cast, providing the little remembered Ona Munson (outside of playing Belle Watling in GWTW and Mother Gin Sling in Shanghai Gesture) with one of her best roles.

The film has a wonderful cast of character players, including Joseph Schildkraut, Eugene Pallette and Billie Burke.

I recall that in his introduction to the film Robert Osborne said it was a personal favourite that he hoped would become a TCM Christmas staple. It's sadly ironic that it's in the year of Robert's death that it will finally be coming on again.

The Cheaters is heartily recommended, and I realize that 99% of viewers have probably never heard of the film. They'll be glad they tuned in.

70144bd2cb6d6802d8dc7511d2de98c4--billie

 

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December programming is singularly uninspiring. Too many repeats. Lots of repeats in November as well. 

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