Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recently Watched Horror


Recommended Posts

A Quiet Place Part II (2020) picks up where the first one ended.  There is a small backstory about the first day the creatures landed on earth. Director John Krasinski builds suspense through pacing, a slow buildup to when someone, as careful as they are, inevitably makes a loud noise that unleashes the slaughter. Krasinski likes to use wide angle shots of people running for their lives as the monsters fly into the frame. Silence is followed by a cacophony of screams.  We see more of the creatures this time, a sort of reptilian extraterrestrial concoction.  Newcomer Cillian Murphy plays a survivalist who has lost everything.  But the strength of the first A Quiet Place, as with the sequel, are the emotional, powerful performances from Emily Blunt, and her onscreen children, played by Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe.  Simmonds especially, blends courage and compassion, garnering our support, so that she becomes the hero. The ending leaves the door open to a third installment.    

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

220px-Deathdream.jpg

Dead of Night aka Deathdream 1974. Directed by Bob Clark. With John Marley, Lynn Carlin, Richard Backus.

A married couple receives news that their son is killed in Vietnam, but soon thereafter the son appears at their door.

The movie has some good moments, especially a scene between the soldier and the doctor, and another between the soldier and his girlfriend, but director Clark is so focused on making a horror movie that any anti-war message and the plight of veterans with PTSD are lost. The combination of genres didn't work for me.

Not very good, but watchable.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

220px-Deathdream.jpg

Dead of Night aka Deathdream 1974. Directed by Bob Clark. With John Marley, Lynn Carlin, Richard Backus.

A married couple receives news that their son is killed in Vietnam, but soon thereafter the son appears at their door.

The movie has some good moments, especially a scene between the soldier and the doctor, and another between the soldier and his girlfriend, but director Clark is so focused on making a horror movie that any anti-war message and the plight of veterans with PTSD are lost. The combination of genres didn't work for me.

Not very good, but watchable.

The last time I saw it I saw it was a very effective variation on "The Monkey's Paw" - even Stephen King uses it as flash back story in "Pet Sematary"  -  I don't think it's suppose to be a serious  statement about Vietnam or veterans for PTSD just a horror film about the horrors of war coming home

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/25/2021 at 10:51 AM, jaragon said:

"Don't Listen" (Voces) (2020) a family moves into a haunted house in this familiar horror film from Spain.  You can see it on Netflix

 

I didn't think it was very good. Lots of jump scares and not enough tension and really scary scenes. The ending feels contrived and unconvincing.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

I didn't think it was very good. Lots of jump scares and not enough tension and really scary scenes. The ending feels contrived and unconvincing.

This is the directors first movie and you can see his influences- I think the script that probably started off as a short was a set up for the final twist- which actually makes no sense- you are telling me the father who spend so much time in the boy's room did not notice the images before?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jaragon said:

This is the directors first movie and you can see his influences- I think the script that probably started off as a short was a set up for the final twist- which actually makes no sense- you are telling me the father who spend so much time in the boy's room did not notice the images before?

That was one big "what the ...?" moment. There is also a scene that was unnecessarily gory and out place with the rest of the movie.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

That was one big "what the ...?" moment. There is also a scene that was unnecessarily gory and out place with the rest of the movie.

 

The film seems to be setting up a Conjuring series with the Old Man and the daughter- also if you move into a house and flies are coming out the wall - wouldn't you check to see what's causing  that?

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jaragon said:

The film seems to be setting up a Conjuring series with the Old Man and the daughter- also if you move into a house and flies are coming out the wall - wouldn't you check to see what's causing  that?

 

Yes, I got the Conjuring connection. It's as if Gómez Hernández is trying to emulate James Wan, especially with the blurry shadows in the background and all those noisy jump scares. And about the flies, most people would check why flies are coming out of the wall, but in this movie nobody even tried to use a bug spray.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

Yes, I got the Conjuring connection. It's as if Gómez Hernández is trying to emulate James Wan, especially with the blurry shadows in the background and all those noisy jump scares. And about the flies, most people would check why flies are coming out of the wall, but in this movie nobody even tried to use a bug spray.

Yeah that was strange specially if they bought the house to renovate and sell?! 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, jaragon said:

Yeah that was strange specially if they bought the house to renovate and sell?! 

On a positive side, I've seen much worse horror movies.

Maybe I'll find one movie over the weekend and if I do, I'll post about it.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/28/2021 at 9:59 PM, Arsan404 said:

I didn't think it was very good. Lots of jump scares and not enough tension and really scary scenes. The ending feels contrived and unconvincing.

It seems modern horror movies require lots of jump scares.  Too many of them and the scare factor gets diluted. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"She-Wolf of London" (1946) this seems to want to be Universal's answer to "Cat People" but it lacks that films scares not too mention a sexy leading lady.  The story is more mystery than horror and at times feels like a radio play.  It needed a bit more shocks

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Y231Lp8xeRL1fUh_69Do4RFC6CZG4oB7tZ4MRNnY

Re-Animator. 1985. Directed by Stuart Gordon. With Jeffrey Combs, Bruce Abbott, Barbara Crampton, David Gale, and Robert Sampson.

A young, high-strung student creates a serum that brings the dead back to life. He convinces a classmate to test the serum on the dead bodies at the hospital morgue, with horrific results.

Based on a story by Lovecraft that I never read, this movie is a terrific little gem of horror with plenty of humor.  Stuart's  direction is inventive, the horror scenes are staged imaginatively, and the humor is sardonic and very funny.

Jeffrey Combs as the Mad Scientist and David Gale as his nemesis overact in a fun, enjoyable and useful way; their overacting sets apart from the rest of the characters.

Surprisingly, I found this movie by chance on YouTube, and I say surprisingly because the movie has plenty of full frontal nudity.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

Y231Lp8xeRL1fUh_69Do4RFC6CZG4oB7tZ4MRNnY

Re-Animator. 1985. Directed by Stuart Gordon. With Jeffrey Combs, Bruce Abbott, Barbara Crampton, David Gale, and Robert Sampson.

A young, high-strung student creates a serum that brings the dead back to life. He convinces a classmate to test the serum on the dead bodies at the hospital morgue, with horrific results.

Based on a story by Lovecraft that I never read, this movie is a terrific little gem of horror with plenty of humor.  Stuart's  direction is inventive, the horror scenes are staged imaginatively, and the humor is sardonic and very funny.

Jeffrey Combs as the Mad Scientist and David Gale as his nemesis overact in a fun, enjoyable and useful way; their overacting sets apart from the rest of the characters.

Surprisingly, I found this movie by chance on YouTube, and I say surprisingly because the movie has plenty of full frontal nudity.

 

And plenty of gore! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I acquired the Severin Films collection The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee, which includes the following chillers:

The Castle of the Living Dead

Crypt of the Vampire (AKA Terror in the Crypt)

Katarsis (AKA Challenge of the Devil)

Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace

Theatre Macabre

The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (based on the little-known novella by Louisa May Alcott no doubt)

IMO, none of Severin Films offerings in the Eurocrypt collection represent highlights in the prolific Lee's considerable oeuvre. Arguably the best of the batch is The Castle of the Living Dead, distinguished as the first movie for Donald Sutherland (who plays two roles, one in drag). Runner-up Torture Chamber has a laudable style and gusto quirkily punctuated with an eccentric score by Peter Thomas (a key contributor in defining the German krimi). Considering the impressive filmmakers involved (screenwriter Curt Siodmak and director Terence Fisher), Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace is a frustrating disappointment. Crypt of the Vampire evinces notable style . . . in service to a middling script (the major detriment in all of Severin Films Eurocrypt selections) and sluggish pace. The most outré and slapdash feature, Katarsis, represents-- as far as I'm concerned -- the nadir in the collection. To date, I've watched only two episodes of Theatre Macabre, a Polish TV series hosted by Lee. Neither episode was macabre, to me.

Severin Films package includes the highly regarded soundtrack for The Castle of the Living Dead. I would  have preferred Thomas' score.

For my money, the treasures in The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee are the compendium Relics from the Crypt, which features interviews with Christopher Lee, and the booklet Christopher Lee: The Continental Connection penned by estimable and always informative and entertaining Jonathan Rigby.

There are worse ways to spend an evening -- several evenings -- than visiting The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee. But to really relish and appreciate the iconic honoree, I prefer to leave the crypt and spend time in the House . . . of Hammer.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I acquired the Severin Films collection The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee, which includes the following chillers:

The Castle of the Living Dead

Crypt of the Vampire (AKA Terror in the Crypt)

Katarsis (AKA Challenge of the Devil)

Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace

Theatre Macabre

The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (based on the little-known novella by Louisa May Alcott no doubt)

IMO, none of Severin Films offerings in the Eurocrypt collection represent highlights in the prolific Lee's considerable oeuvre. Arguably the best of the batch is The Castle of the Living Dead, distinguished as the first movie for Donald Sutherland (who plays two roles, one in drag). Runner-up Torture Chamber has a laudable style and gusto quirkily punctuated with an eccentric score by Peter Thomas (a key contributor in defining the German krimi). Considering the impressive filmmakers involved (screenwriter Curt Siodmak and director Terence Fisher), Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace is a frustrating disappointment. Crypt of the Vampire evinces notable style . . . in service to a middling script (the major detriment in all of Severin Films Eurocrypt selections) and sluggish pace. The most outré and slapdash feature, Katarsis, represents-- as far as I'm concerned -- the nadir in the collection. To date, I've watched only two episodes of Theatre Macabre, a Polish TV series hosted by Lee. Neither episode was macabre, to me.

Severin Films package includes the highly regarded soundtrack for The Castle of the Living Dead. I would  have preferred Thomas' score.

For my money, the treasures in The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee are the compendium Relics from the Crypt, which features interviews with Christopher Lee, and the booklet Christopher Lee: The Continental Connection penned by estimable and always informative and entertaining Jonathan Rigby.

There are worse ways to spend an evening -- several evenings -- than visiting The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee. But to really relish and appreciate the iconic honoree, I prefer to leave the crypt and spend time in the House . . . of Hammer.

Thanks for the review I was thinking about getting this one

Link to post
Share on other sites

jaragon,

Don't let my post persuade you to acquire or dissuade you from acquiring The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee -- please!

Chacun à son goût, de gustibus non est disputandum, one man's meat, etc.

Some of the movies in the Severin Films collection are freely available on the Web. So, you can give them a "test drive" to see if they are to your liking.

Jonathan Rigby's commendable treatise explains why Lee appeared in the movies comprising the Eurocrypt collection. Not suprisingly, Lee's decisions were not for "artistic" reasons.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

jaragon,

Don't let my post persuade you to, or dissuade you from,  acquiring The Eurocrypt of Christopher Lee -- please!

Chacun à son goût, de gustibus non est disputandum, one man's meat, etc.

Some of the movies in the Severin Films collection are freely available on the Web. So, you can give them a "test drive" to see if they are to your liking.

Jonathan Rigby's commendable treatise explains why Lee appeared in the movies comprising the Eurocrypt collection. Not suprisingly, Lee's decisions were not for "artistic" reasons.

 

Lee was working actor I imagine he did a lot of films just for the paycheck- he was in "Airport 77" after all

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Christopher Lee -- like his co-star in House of the Long Shadows, John Carradine* -- was an indefatigable workhorse who, arguably, squandered his talent by appearing in lots of shlock.

* Whose voluminous filmography surpasses Lee's lengthy catalog.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jaragon said:

This one is more thriller than horror but it'd effective gimmick free film from William Castle  https://youtu.be/s5wHLYT61fs

I agree.

I Saw What You Did reminds thriller fans that William Castle proved his mettle on "B movie" gems such as The Whistler, The Mark of the Whistler, and When Strangers Marry before he became "King of the Gimmicks."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I agree.

I Saw What You Did reminds thriller fans that William Castle proved his mettle on "B movie" gems such as The Whistler, The Mark of the Whistler, and When Strangers Marry before he became "King of the Gimmicks."

It was his Hitchcock period- it was very effective and that shower murder is shocking- but  I thought the girls were too naive- I think there was a made for cable remake.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...