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4 hours ago, jaragon said:

It's interesting to compare to another movie "Haunted Summer" (1988) which tells the same story in a more conventional matter.  The plot of both movies is the same but in "Haunted "is more psychological than Russell's craziness.  Shelly gets naked in both films-but Erich Stoltz goes full frontal for  dip in a river.   Alice Kriege seems smarter as Mary.   The biggest difference is the portrayal of Dr Polidori- he is a grotesque sexually repressed freak in "Gothic" but he is a bit more sensitive in "Haunted" and even gets a discreet sex scene with Byron.  Alex Winter is more attractive than Timothy Spall. , In both films we are teased with  a sexual encounter between Shelly and Byron which never goes beyond a kiss . And does anyone know what happened to Philip Anglim- his last IMBD credit is from 1998.   Here is the trailer for "Haunted Summer" which over sells the Shelley- Byron bromance

 

The movie has a good cast and the trailer looks interesting. Thanks!

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All the Colors of Giallo (2019) - Tuvi

all_the_colors_of_giallo.jpg?w=450&ssl=1

Currently available on Tuvi, this documentary directed by Federico Caddeo is a top-level overview of Italian giallo (what else?) films which primarily focuses on Mario Bava (The Girl Who Know Too Much, Blood and Black Lace and A Bay of Blood), Dario Argento (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, The Cat o' Nine Tails, Four Flies on Grey Velvet, Deep Red, Tenebrae and Giallo), Lucio Fulci (One on Top of the Other, A Lizard in a Woman's Skin, Don't Torture a Duckling and The Psychic), Umberto Lenzi (So Sweet...So Perverse, Orgasmo, Paranoia, Knife of Ice, Spasmo and Eyeball) and Sergio Martino (The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh, Your Vice Is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key and All the Colors of the Dark). But also includes references to other directors (Aldo Lado (The Short Night of the Glass Dolls and Who Saw Her Die?), Giuliano Carmimeo (The Case of the Bloody Iris), Duccio Tessari (Death Occurred Last Night and The Bloodstained Butterfly) and Luciano Ercoli (Forbidden Photos of a Lady Above Suspicion, Death Walks on High Heels and Death Walks at Midnight)).

Fairly talkative (or, in my case, readative (is that a word?) since it is in Italian with English subtitles) as it is mostly narrated by a historian. But it does include interviews (some archived, most not) with many of the aforementioned names plus various screenwriters and actors (Barbara Bouchet, Edwige Fenech, George Hilton, Nieves Navarro and Daria Nicolodi). But still fairly interesting and would serve as an ideal introduction (albeit with some spoilers) to someone new to this genre or, in my case, an ideal reintroduction to someone who hasn't really watched any of these movies since the 1970s. And definitely provides one with a nice list of what movies to start with (and, I'll be honest, I do hear Ms. Fenech call to me in that regard!).

And, yes, this should probably have been posted somewhere in the "Documentaries" genre forum. But, audience-wise, this forum seems way more appropriate.

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46 minutes ago, LiamCasey said:

All the Colors of Giallo (2019) - Tuvi

all_the_colors_of_giallo.jpg?w=450&ssl=1

Currently available on Tuvi, this documentary directed by Federico Caddeo is a top-level overview of Italian giallo . . .

Streaming, Screaming Gialli

Here is the link to Federico Caddeo's documentary on Tubi.

https://tubitv.com/movies/496155/all-the-colors-of-giallo

Yesterday I subscribed to ARROW, the streaming service offshoot of Arrow Films. Several gialli thereon. Ditto on Shudder.

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10 hours ago, jaragon said:

This poor guy suffers so much no wonder he goes nuts-another excellent Scream Factory Blu ray

 

Never seen Silent Night, Deadly Night. Do you recommend it? What about it grabs you?

The almost similarly titled 1972 chiller Silent Night, Bloody Night is a favorite of mine. Featuring an impressive cast that includes Patrick O'Neal, John Carradine, Walter Abel, and desirably dangerous Mary Woronov, it is further distinguished by a stylishly filmed and intensely creepy flashback (that features Philip Bruns and alumni of Andy Warhol's "Factory" Ondine and drag queen Candy Darling). The low budget and grimy, grainy photography paradoxically enhance the plot's morbid tone and eerie atmosphere. Co-star James Patterson (a Tony award winner) is dubbed in the movie; he died shortly after the production of SNBN ended. Co-produced by Lloyd Kaufman of Troma fame.

 

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14 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Never seen Silent Night, Deadly Night. Do you recommend it? What about it grabs you?

The almost similarly titled 1972 chiller Silent Night, Bloody Night is a favorite of mine. Featuring an impressive cast that includes Patrick O'Neal, John Carradine, Walter Abel, and desirably dangerous Mary Woronov, it is further distinguished by a stylishly filmed and intensely creepy flashback (that features Philip Bruns and alumni of Andy Warhol's "Factory" Ondine and drag queen Candy Darling). The low budget and grimy, grainy photography paradoxically enhance the plot's morbid tone and eerie atmosphere. Co-star James Patterson (a Tony award winner) is dubbed in the movie; he died shortly after the production of SNBN ended. Co-produced by Lloyd Kaufman of Troma fame.

 

"Silent Night Deadly Night" is a well done slasher- some of the murder scenes are cleverly staged- the guy playing the psycho Santa is effective because he looks like the All American boy next door not the the usual monster

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George Romero uses horror film imagery to expose the terrors of growing old- not really a horror film but worth watching if you admire Romero. You can see it on Shudder

 

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"Attack of the Giant Leeches" Tennessee Williams meets Roger Corman in this low budget horror film which spends more time on sexy Yvette Vickers than the blood sucking monsters

 

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On 7/30/2021 at 11:46 AM, jaragon said:

I re-watched the new "Suspiria" which is better if one does not think of it as remake- it's still too long

 

I recently watched the original 1977 Suspiria. It nicely blended camp, humor and terror.  The score, and colors (so much red) I also liked.  It was very violent, and I was guessing how the violence was going to play out, until it happened, and it was jolting.  Sexually it was restrained, but the lesbian subtext was there.  I can see why it’s considered a horror classic.

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7 hours ago, jaragon said:

"Attack of the Giant Leeches" Tennessee Williams meets Roger Corman in this low budget horror film which spends more time on sexy Yvette Vickers than the blood sucking monsters

 

I saw Attack of the Giant Leeches at a drive-in*. It was the bottom-half of a double-feature top-lined by House of Usher. For many years, I didn't realize that I had seen it until I watched it on TV and heard the sound made by the leeches.

* For all the children out there, an outdoor venue -- resembling a parking lot -- where movies were shown and babies were made.

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22 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I saw Attack of the Giant Leeches at a drive-in*. It was the bottom-half of a double-feature top-lined by House of Usher. For many years, I didn't realize that I had seen it until I watched it on TV and heard the sound made by the leeches.

* For all the children out there, an outdoor venue -- resembling a parking lot -- where movies were shown and babies were made.

Thank you for letting the 21st century kids know about drive ins  but I think there are still some around

 

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'The Blood Beast Terror" (1968) Peter Cushing investigates a series of murders in which the male victims have been drained of blood.  The movie lacks the Hammer look and budget but it's interesting to see the female monster go after men. You can see it for free on Tubi Tv

 

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On 8/21/2021 at 8:51 AM, jaragon said:

'The Blood Beast Terror" (1968) Peter Cushing investigates a series of murders in which the male victims have been drained of blood.  The movie lacks the Hammer look and budget but it's interesting to see the female monster go after men. You can see it for free on Tubi Tv

 

Reportedly, Peter Cushing considered this his worst movie*.

I, OTOH, think Cushing made worse movies -- a whole lot worse -- than The Blood Beast Terror (AKA The Vampire Beast Craves Blood -- a movie marquee-hog if I ever saw one) -- YMMV: Incense for the Damned (AKA Bloodsuckers), Mystery on Monster Island, and Night of the Big Heat (AKA Island of the Burning Damned).

Sorry, PC (wherever you are), I happen to like The Blood Beast Terror, a production from Tigon, a small British outfit that doesn't get much respect but which I also happen to fancy (Tigon's The Beast in the Cellar being a particular favorite among its slim catalog of chillers and exploitation fare). My initial interest in seeing Cushing's "worst movie" was compelled by Robert Flemyng's melodramatic expression in a still used in Movie Monsters by Denis Gifford.

Again according to report, Cushing appeared in TBBT to pay for his ailing wife Helen's medical treatments.

* Co-star Robert Flemyng (who replaced Basil Rathbone) shared Cushing's poor opinion of TBBT, but expressed his criticism in more vehement and profane terms.

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1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Reportedly, Peter Cushing considered this his worst movie*.

I, OTOH, think Cushing made worse movies -- a whole lot worse -- than The Blood Beast Terror (AKA The Vampire Beast Craves Blood -- a movie marquee-hog if I ever saw one) -- YMMV: Incense for the Damned (AKA Bloodsuckers), Mystery on Monster Island, and Night of the Big Heat (AKA Island of the Burning Damned).

Sorry, PC (wherever you are), I happen to like The Blood Beast Terror, a production from Tigon, a small British outfit that doesn't get much respect but which I also happen to fancy (Tigon's The Beast in the Cellar being a particular favorite among its slim catalog of chillers and exploitation fare). My initial interest in seeing Cushing's "worst movie" was compelled by Robert Flemyng's melodramatic expression in a still used in Movie Monsters by Denis Gifford.

Again according to report, Cushing appeared in TBBT to pay for his ailing wife Helen's medical treatments.

* Co-star Robert Flemyng (who replaced Basil Rathbone) shared Cushing's poor opinion of TBBT, but expressed his criticism in more vehement and profane terms.

It lacks the class and production values of a Hammer production but it's not that bad. The story borrows a lot from Hammer's "The Gorgon" but that had beautiful Technicolor and the stylish direction of Terrence Fisher.  But the creature is effective monster

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"Rest in Pieces" (1987)  is really bad. A greatly disliked woman poisons herself and leaves her money and estate to her niece.  Dorothy Malone at the end of her legendary career plays the aunt. The woman who plays the niece was hired  to show of her breast. She is topless so many time it becomes a running joke. The plot makes no sense - but it has something to do with madness, medical experiments and homicidal zombies. A must watch for fans of bad horror films you can watch it for free on Tubi TV-

 

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On 8/27/2021 at 9:38 AM, jaragon said:

"Rest in Pieces" (1987)  is really bad. A greatly disliked woman poisons herself and leaves her money and estate to her niece.  Dorothy Malone at the end of her legendary career plays the aunt. The woman who plays the niece was hired  to show of her breast. She is topless so many time it becomes a running joke. The plot makes no sense - but it has something to do with madness, medical experiments and homicidal zombies. A must watch for fans of bad horror films you can watch it for free on Tubi TV-

 

Director José Ramón Larraz [Gil] is, perhaps, better remembered for the celebrated Vampyres (another chiller by Larraz, Symptoms, is also highly regarded). Those are the only two of Larraz' movies that I've seen (and own). Based on the little about him that I've read and a cursory glance at his filmography, I'm not certain that I want to see more of his efforts.

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On 8/27/2021 at 9:24 PM, mr6666 said:

Candyman  ( 2021)- Official Trailer (Universal Pictures) HD

 

orig. CANDYMAN  '92 was pretty cool!

we'll have to see about THIS  :unsure:

I never saw the original, and I'll probably skip the remake. I know that Jordan Peele is, I guess, supposed to be the modern "Master of Horror." But, I wasn't all that thrilled by Get Out and Us.

Although the horror film is my favorite genre, I must admit, in all honesty, lately it isn't. The last horror movie that I ventured outside my residence to actually see in a movie theatre was The Unholy, which I liked but didn't love.

I prefer "period horror" (particularly Gothic and Victorian horror) to horror movies set in modern/contemporary times. More, I prefer horror movies that are macabre -- rather than sadistic -- and supernatural in tone. I like old-fashioned "monster movies," and I prefer my monsters to be "old school" vampires, werewolves, mummies, ghosts, and creations of mad scientists. I'm not into "slashers" and "torture porn" nor "human" monsters: maniacs, serial killers, terrorists, and psychos . . . unless they are essayed with restraint (by which I mean no explicit, gruesome, "splatter" violence), élan, and theatrical flair by grand masters. I abhor explicit, graphic savagery -- I want to enjoy a movie, not be subjected to an endurance test.

Being old enough to remember when there were Horror Film Stars ("See the Master of Evil in his last and most shocking role!"), I nostalgically miss the era of the Silver Screen Boogeymen.

I prefer stories involving adults, preferably educated, cultured, articulate, and above all, mature. Upon seeing "a group of teens . . ." or "college students terrorized by . . ." in a synopsis, I pass.

Further diminishing my interest in 21st century horror films are the rise of "femme-centric" horror pix and the invasion of the genre by women filmmakers. <_<  Feh!

Fortunately, I have alternative choices, thanks to home video and Internet streaming services . . . and, of course, TCM.

 

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20 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I never saw the original, and I'll probably skip the remake. I know that Jordan Peele is, I guess, supposed to be the modern "Master of Horror." But, I wasn't all that thrilled by Get Out and Us.

Although the horror film is my favorite genre, I must admit, in all honesty, lately it isn't. The last horror movie that I ventured outside my residence to actually see in a movie theatre was The Unholy, which I liked but didn't love.

I prefer "period horror" (particularly Gothic and Victorian horror) to horror movies set in modern/contemporary times. More, I prefer horror movies that are macabre -- rather than sadistic -- and supernatural in tone. I like old-fashioned "monster movies," and I prefer my monsters to be "old school" vampires, werewolves, mummies, ghosts, and creations of mad scientists. I'm not into "slashers" and "torture porn" nor "human" monsters: maniacs, serial killers, terrorists, and psychos . . . unless they are essayed with restraint (by which I mean no explicit, gruesome, "splatter" violence), élan, and theatrical flair by grand masters. I abhor explicit, graphic savagery -- I want to enjoy a movie, not be subjected to an endurance test.

Being old enough to remember when there were Horror Film Stars ("See the Master of Evil in his last and most shocking role!"), I nostalgically miss the era of the Silver Screen Boogeymen.

I prefer stories involving adults, preferably educated, cultured, articulate, and above all, mature. Upon seeing "a group of teens . . ." or "college students terrorized by . . ." in a synopsis, I pass.

Further diminishing my interest in 21st century horror films are the rise of "femme-centric" horror pix and the invasion of the genre by women filmmakers. <_<  Feh!

Fortunately, I have alternative choices, thanks to home video and Internet streaming services . . . and, of course, TCM.

 

I saw the trailer which seem a bit woke to me - which I will not rush out to see it- "Us" was a mess- the final twist made no sense and added more questions than it answered but I thought "Get Out" was good and Mr Peele is obviously a fan on Ira Levin.     Did you see "The Nun" ?  It felt like a period horror film to me

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13 minutes ago, jaragon said:

I saw the trailer which seem a bit woke to me - which I will not rush out to see it- "Us" was a mess- the final twist made no sense and added more questions than it answered but I thought "Get Out" was good and Mr Peele is obviously a fan on Ira Levin.     Did you see "The Nun" ?  It felt like a period horror film to me

I have not yet seen The Nun. Based on the trailer, it looks appealing. I'll definitely check it out. Thanks for the alert!

The last period horror movie that I saw and liked -- but not as much as I wanted to like it -- was Crimson Peak. I thought that it should have at least gotten an Oscar nod for production design. Instead the motion picture academy gave its "Best Picture" award to another Guillermo del Toro flick, The Shape of Water . . . which I didn't dig.

 

 

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17 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I have not yet seen The Nun. Based on the trailer, it looks appealing. I'll definitely check it out. Thanks for the alert!

The last period horror movie that I saw and liked -- but not as much as I wanted to like it -- was Crimson Peak. I thought that it should have at least gotten an Oscar nod for production design. Instead the motion picture academy gave its "Best Picture" award to another Guillermo del Toro flick, The Shape of Water . . . which I didn't dig.

 

 

I totally agree about "Crimson Peak" one of the most beautiful horror films ever made- should have been nominated for costume and art direction.  Yeah I was not that impressed by "The Shape of Water" either- I mean it was good but not Oscar worthy- DelToro had made better films-"Pan's Labyrinth" and "The Devil Backbone" are more Oscar worthy.  

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On 8/29/2021 at 4:34 PM, jaragon said:

"Us" was a mess- the final twist made no sense and added more questions than it answered but I thought "Get Out" was good and Mr Peele is obviously a fan on Ira Levin

 

On 8/29/2021 at 5:01 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Crimson Peak. I thought that it should have at least gotten an Oscar nod for production design. Instead the motion picture academy gave its "Best Picture" award to another Guillermo del Toro flick, The Shape of Water . . . which I didn't dig.

I enjoyed Get Out to a certain degree, but I didn't think it was very good. A mixture of horror styles from Hammer to Levin that ultimately didn't gel; even 2AM: The Smiling Man is referenced in the movie.

Us is pretty bad and doesn't make much sense. The only good thing about it is Lupita Nyong'o's performance; I think she is very good.

I liked The Shape of Water. Not among his top movies, but it is well directed and Sally Hawkins is excellent in the lead role.  On the other hand, I didn't care much for Crimson Peak.

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14 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

 

I enjoyed Get Out to a certain degree, but I didn't think it was very good. A mixture of horror styles from Hammer to Levin that ultimately didn't gel; even 2AM: The Smiling Man is referenced in the movie.

Us is pretty bad and doesn't make much sense. The only good thing about it is Lupita Nyong'o's performance; I think she is very good.

I liked The Shape of Water. Not among his top movies, but it is well directed and Sally Hawkins is excellent in the lead role.  On the other hand, I didn't care much for Crimson Peak.

I loved the look of "Crimson Peak" but was not crazy about the story which seems to want to be both supernatural and psycho horror.  "Us" might have made sense if he had gone the supernatural route

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8 hours ago, jaragon said:

I loved the look of "Crimson Peak" but was not crazy about the story which seems to want to be both supernatural and psycho horror.  "Us" might have made sense if he had gone the supernatural route

Yeah, the look (cinematography and especially the production design) of Crimson Peak is what redeems the rather blah plot for me.

I've yet to see a Guillermo del Toro movie that totally grabs me (and I haven't seen all of del Toro's movies). I've come to expect "style over substance" when I watch a del Toro flick.

Another problem that I have with del Toro is his conception of the horror film as a fairy tale. It's his infusion (for me, infection) of a childlike (or, to be nasty about it, childish) sensibility into The Shape of Water that put me off del Toro's "most personal film" and  "old-fashioned love story" (not what I'm looking for in a horror movie).

     " The idea for me is that if the movie connects with you the way I want it to connect with you, you should be experiencing both the horror and the wonder as a child would.
       From a child's point of view. When we're kids, brutality registers differently than when we are adults. Because as adults, we get too used to violence.
"

Thus, I shouldn't be surprised that del Toro has ventured into the sandbox of kid's movies. Oh well.

I digested my "inner child" long, long, long ago. Now that I'm a man, I've given up childish things. Such as a child's sense of "wonder" . . . and, it seems,  Guillermo del Toro movies.

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13 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Yeah, the look (cinematography and especially the production design) of Crimson Peak is what redeems the rather blah plot for me.

I've yet to see a Guillermo del Toro movie that totally grabs me (and I haven't seen all of del Toro's movies). I've come to expect "style over substance" when I watch a del Toro flick.

Another problem that I have with del Toro is his conception of the horror film as a fairy tale. It's his infusion (for me, infection) of a childlike (or, to be nasty about it, childish) sensibility into The Shape of Water that put me off del Toro's "most personal film" and  "old-fashioned love story" (not what I'm looking for in a horror movie).

     " The idea for me is that if the movie connects with you the way I want it to connect with you, you should be experiencing both the horror and the wonder as a child would.
       From a child's point of view. When we're kids, brutality registers differently than when we are adults. Because as adults, we get too used to violence.
"

Thus, I shouldn't be surprised that del Toro has ventured into the sandbox of kid's movies. Oh well.

I digested my "inner child" long, long, long ago. Now that I'm a man, I've given up childish things. Such as a child's sense of "wonder" . . . and, it seems,  Guillermo del Toro movies.

Yes Del Toro has a fairy tale sensibility when it comes to horror- had done kid's tv shows like "Troll Hunters"

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