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Lucio Fulci's "The New York Ripper"  (1982) is a sleazy and extremely violent thriller about a psycho killer terrorizing New York City.  I prefer his more fantasy oriented horror film . Fulci wants to out do both Brian DePalma and William Friedkin.  There is an emphasis on kinky sex and the murders are photographed like rape scenes.  Fulci can create suspense but here he seems only interested in shocks.  The  plot makes no sense and the final killer reveal seems to come out of left field- the movie ends in a heart breaking final image . If you are into gore and sleazy there is a really good print on Tubi TV.  

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7 hours ago, jaragon said:

Lucio Fulci's "The New York Ripper"  (1982) is a sleazy and extremely violent thriller about a psycho killer terrorizing New York City.  I prefer his more fantasy oriented horror film . . . .

Although I'm not a Fulci fan (because I'm not a "gorehound"), a few of his movies are in my movie library, primarily some of his gialli and a couple of his westerns:

Le Colt Cantarono la Morte e Fu... Tempo di Massacro (AKA Massacre Time)

Gatto nero (AKA The Black Cat)

I Quattro dell'Apocalisse (AKA Four of the Apocalypse)

Il Miele del Diavolo (AKA The Devil's Honey)

Murderock - Uccide a Passo di Danza  (AKA Murder Rock)

Non Si  Sevizia un Paperino (AKA Don't Torture a Duckling)

Una Lucertola con la Pelle di Donna (AKA Lizard in a Woman's Skin, AKA Schizoid)

Una Sull'altra (AKA One on Top of the Other, AKA Perversion Story )

Before I delved deeper into Fulci's oeuvre, I had written him off as a crummy hack -- waaaayyy down on the list of Italian horror filmmakers and definitely not in the same league with Mario Bava, Riccardo Freda, or even Antonio Margheriti. But after viewing the flicks on my list, I have softened my attitude about Lucio Fulci. He was a better filmmaker than I initially thought that he was. That Fulci descended into bloody splatter and grue to become "The Godfather of Gore" (his legacy), to me, was unfortunate and a shame.

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17 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Although I'm not a Fulci fan (because I'm not a "gorehound"), a few of his movies are in my movie library, primarily some of his gialli and a couple of his westerns:

Le Colt Cantarono la Morte e Fu... Tempo di Massacro (AKA Massacre Time)

Gatto nero (AKA The Black Cat)

I Quattro dell'Apocalisse (AKA Four of the Apocalypse)

Il Miele del Diavolo (AKA The Devil's Honey)

Murderock - Uccide a Passo di Danza  (AKA Murder Rock)

Non Si  Sevizia un Paperino (AKA Don't Torture a Duckling)

Una Lucertola con la Pelle di Donna (AKA Lizard in a Woman's Skin, AKA Schizoid)

Una Sull'altra (AKA One on Top of the Other, AKA Perversion Story )

Before I delved deeper into Fulci's oeuvre, I had written him off as a crummy hack -- waaaayyy down on the list of Italian horror filmmakers and definitely not in the same league with Mario Bava, Riccardo Freda, or even Antonio Margheriti. But after viewing the flicks on my list, I have softened my attitude about Lucio Fulci. He was a better filmmaker than I initially thought that he was. That Fulci descended into bloody splatter and grue to become "The Godfather of Gore" (his legacy), to me, was unfortunate and a shame.

Like  I said I like Fulci's horror films like " House by the Cemetery" but this one was really disturbing in it's anti women violence- the murders were staged like rapes- and there is a really bizarre rape by foot scene which is there just to shock. 

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"Curse of the Black Widow" (1977)  Anthony Franciosa  stars as  private detective named Mark Higbie is on the trail of a murderer whose mutilated and predominantly male victims are found encased in silken cocoons.  An effective made for TV horror with Patty Duke, Donna Mills, June Lockhart  and June Allyson.  Directed by Dan Curtis.  You can see it on Amazon Prime

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5 hours ago, jaragon said:

"Curse of the Black Widow" (1977)  Anthony Franciosa  stars as  private detective named Mark Higbie is on the trail of a murderer whose mutilated and predominantly male victims are found encased in silken cocoons.  An effective made for TV horror with Patty Duke, Donna Mills, June Lockhart  and June Allyson.  Directed by Dan Curtis.  You can see it on Amazon Prime

Whatta coinkydink! I watched Curse of the Black Widow just a couple of weeks ago.

TV movies from Dan Curtis Productions are always worth a look, IMO. This chiller had a Kolchak: The Night Stalker vibe, with Anthony Franciosa's P.I. substituting for Darren McGavin's intrepid newspaper reporter-monster hunter.

Yes, it's formulaic.

Yes, it's predictable.

Yes, it's a cookie-cutter, by-the-numbers, assembly line production.

Yes, it's all been done before by Curtis, BUT . . .

It's also and above all, entirely entertaining and a whole lotta fun!

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On 9/9/2021 at 6:31 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Whatta coinkydink! I watched Curse of the Black Widow just a couple of weeks ago.

TV movies from Dan Curtis Productions are always worth a look, IMO. This chiller had a Kolchak: The Night Stalker vibe, with Anthony Franciosa's P.I. substituting for Darren McGavin's intrepid newspaper reporter-monster hunter.

Yes, it's formulaic.

Yes, it's predictable.

Yes, it's a cookie-cutter, by-the-numbers, assembly line production.

Yes, it's all been done before by Curtis, BUT . . .

It's also and above all, entirely entertaining and a whole lotta fun!

I agree with all your points- yes did you see "The Norliss Tapes" ? That tv movie is very similar in style and tone and has one really terrifying scene. " Curse of the Black Widow" also is a hommage to the original cat people in which a woman's sexual desires unleashes a monster.

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2 hours ago, jaragon said:

I agree with all your points- yes did you see "The Norliss Tapes" ? That tv movie is very similar in style and tone and has one really terrifying scene. " Curse of the Black Widow" also is a hommage to the original cat people in which a woman's sexual desires unleashes a monster.

Yeah, I saw The Norliss Tapes -- another DCP gem!

The seventies was a wonderful decade for TV horror. Besides The Norliss Tapes, there was also A Cold Night's Death, Gargoyles, Salem's Lot, Spectre (produced by Gene Roddenberry), and, of course, Curtis' Trilogy of Terror, among many other small-screen screamers. I recently caught up with Satan's Triangle on Amazon Prime -- delightfully eerie!

Ever seen Scream, Pretty Peggy? For some odd reason, I deliberately skipped it during its initial broadcast. It's going to be released on Blu-ray Disc next month. Directed by Gordon Hessler and co-scripted by Jimmy Sangster, which gives it, IMO, an impressive pedigree.

 

 

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"Prey" (2021) 

is more suspense thriller than horror. A  brobonding  camping trip goes wrong when a group of men are stalked by a hunter.  The first hour has a lot of tension but once the hunter is revealed the film looses steam.  You can see this German made mash up of "Deliverance" and "The Most Dangerous Game" on Netflix

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Night of the Living Dead (1968)  This low-budget horror hit holds up quite well. The obvious connection to present day is the isolation. Apart from the flesh-eating zombies, the characters are fighting each other. They all want to stay alive, but this supreme instinct is subject to fissures. There’s an unstated racial tension between the take-charge African American Ben, and Harry Cooper, who resents being challenged. A mild campiness comes in further along. A small pleasure is the TV news anchor coolly reporting on a dawning apocalypse. The black and white photography gave a cinema verite to the production.  An effective score never hurts, and in Night of the Living Dead, the music signals we are in for quite a ride.      

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On 11/4/2021 at 7:26 AM, cinemaspeak59 said:

Night of the Living Dead (1968)  This low-budget horror hit holds up quite well. The obvious connection to present day is the isolation. Apart from the flesh-eating zombies, the characters are fighting each other. They all want to stay alive, but this supreme instinct is subject to fissures. There’s an unstated racial tension between the take-charge African American Ben, and Harry Cooper, who resents being challenged. A mild campiness comes in further along. A small pleasure is the TV news anchor coolly reporting on a dawning apocalypse. The black and white photography gave a cinema verite to the production.  An effective score never hurts, and in Night of the Living Dead, the music signals we are in for quite a ride.      

Romero's classic is still frightning

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TV Terrors: Journey to the Unknown

I'm currently enjoying episodes of Journey to the Unknown on YouTube. Heretofore, the only memory of that short-lived anthology series that I had was the eerie intro, which featured a roller coaster*. Broadcast in 1968 and 1969 and fashioned by Hammer Films and 20th Century Fox Television, JttU boasted a sterling pedigree that included producers Anthony Hinds, Joan Harrison, and Norman Lloyd (the latter two overseers being graduates from Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour). The casting of American stars (such as Joseph Cotten, George Maharis, Vera Miles, and Stephanie Powers) in the British series harkens back to the "quota quickies" churned out by Exclusive Films/Hammer Films during the 1950s.

For my tastes, Journey to the Unknown beats the "TV Terrors" that are currently polluting American television.

* In, according to info on the Web, "Battersea Park Fun Fair in the London Borough of Wandsworth, London."

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On 11/4/2021 at 6:26 AM, cinemaspeak59 said:

Night of the Living Dead (1968)  This low-budget horror hit holds up quite well. The obvious connection to present day is the isolation. Apart from the flesh-eating zombies, the characters are fighting each other. They all want to stay alive, but this supreme instinct is subject to fissures. There’s an unstated racial tension between the take-charge African American Ben, and Harry Cooper, who resents being challenged. A mild campiness comes in further along. A small pleasure is the TV news anchor coolly reporting on a dawning apocalypse. The black and white photography gave a cinema verite to the production.  An effective score never hurts, and in Night of the Living Dead, the music signals we are in for quite a ride.      

Even though I'm not a fan of zombie horror, Night of the Living Dead is one of my top horror movies of all time.

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