Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

When Two Ladies Meet/Holiday Inn


DonnaMc
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was watching this morning (12/26) and was noticing some similarities in the sets of these two movies. I was wondering if anyone knew if these two movies might have been shot using the same set - or parts of it or if I am imagining things.

 

The stage area in Holiday Inn resembles the stair area in the house where the Two Ladies Meet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sets were used and reused throughout the history of moviemaking. It's a way to save time and money. There's a staircase that was used in the Magnificent Ambersons, and used again the next year in Cat People, and probably many more times. The set decorators work magic with a little paint, and the right lighting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not likely, Donna, as "When Ladies Meet" was made by MGM, while "Holiday Inn" was filmed over at Paramount.

 

I've heard it said that parts of the "Holiday Inn" set were used in "White Christmas," but I don't know whether that is true or not.

 

It's interesting that you should bring this up; I was watching RKO's "A Man to Remember" yesterday and noticed a set from "The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle" (made the following year) in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know Dracula (1931) In the early days of sound, it was common for Hollywood studios to produce foreign language versions of their films (usually in French, Spanish and German) using the same sets, costumes and etc., because early sound film audiences regarded dubbing as a cheat on the magic of talking pictures. Unfortunately, most of these foreign language versions no longer exist. The Spanish version of Dracula is an exception. The Spanish language version of Dr?cula was made by director George Melford who simultaneously filmed the movie using the same sets at night.

 

In "Young Frankenstein" when Mel Brooks was preparing "Young Frankenstein," he found that Ken Strickfaden, who had made the elaborate electrical machinery for the lab sequences in the Universal Frankenstein films, was still alive in the Los Angeles area. He visited Strickfaden and found that Strickfaden had saved all the equipment and had it stored in his garage. Brooks made a deal to rent the equipment for his film and gave Strickfaden the screen credit he'd deserved, but hadn't gotten, for the original films.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...