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Why is Fredric March forgotten?


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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

Now, how many times do I have to tell you people the following?!

Rob Stephenson moved from Boone City to L.A. right after he graduated high school, and ended up sharing an apartment with Chuck Cunningham who had moved from Milwaukee after HE had graduated high school a few years later. AND, with both going to postwar L.A. thinking they could become big famous movie stars.

But of course, and as is usually the case, neither of 'em could break into the biz, and so with Chuck becoming the night shift assistant manager of the Hollywood Bowl for a while (no, not that famous music venue along the Cahuenga Pass out there, the bowling ALLEY located on the 5700 block of Wilshire) AND with Rob...well, poor Rob.

(...the last anybody heard from HIM, he sent his sister Peggy back in Boone City a letter saying he was working as a pool cleaner for the rich folks along Sunset Blvd, and there was this one pool that belonged to some old silent movie actress who had caused quite a mess one night in hers, and the clean-up according to Rob, and due primarily to all the blood in the water, took forever)  

Chuck Cunningham! Don't think I don't know what you're doing there, Dargo. I watched ALL the seasons of Happy Days!

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10 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Chuck Cunningham! Don't think I don't know what you're doing there, Dargo. I watched ALL the seasons of Happy Days!

Then you would know after Season-1, Richie's older brother Chuck somehow vanished into thin air, and even talk over the Cunningham dinner table never ever seemed to touch upon the subject of Mr. and Mrs. C's eldest child and his possible whereabouts or condition, huh. ;)

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13 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Maybe Al was hurt over Rob pretty much rejecting the sword that he gave him as a gift.

Rob really didn't make much of an impression on me to really miss his presence for the rest of the film. He really was one of the most wasted characters ever in a movie.

 

:lol:  Well, in THAT movie, it was his FATHER that usually seemed to be the most "wasted". :D

Anyway, my impression of Rob is that to me, he always came off as kind of a simp.  

Sepiatone

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I don't know what you folks are talking about, but back to the original question, why is Fredric March forgotten? I'd say because he did so much work for Paramount, especially from 1929 into the mid 1930s, when he was playing leading men. He also did work for Universal in the 1940s. Since Universal owns, not only their own films but Paramount's pre 1949 talking picture catalog, and Universal has done practically nothing with either, nobody has seen him in leading roles that much. He played supporting roles in later films that get more play when he was older, but the spotlight was not on him that much by the 1950s.

It is odd he is so forgotten. He won Best Actor Oscars in 1931 and in 1946, and if you've ever seen him parody John Barrymore in  Royal Family of Broadway, for which he was up for a Best Actor Oscar but lost, you would also be impressed. He was hardly the lead in this last film, but if there had best supporting role Oscars in 1930 I am sure he would have won. His mimicry of Barrymore's movements and ways were uncanny. It's just a shame that hardly anybody alive has probably ever seen it.

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17 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

I don't know what you folks are talking about, but back to the original question, why is Fredric March forgotten? I'd say because he did so much work for Paramount, especially from 1929 into the mid 1930s, when he was playing leading men. He also did work for Universal in the 1940s. Since Universal owns, not only their own films but Paramount's pre 1949 talking picture catalog, and Universal has done practically nothing with either, nobody has seen him in leading roles that much. He played supporting roles in later films that get more play when he was older, but the spotlight was not on him that much by the 1950s.

It is odd he is so forgotten. He won Best Picture Actors in 1931 and in 1946, and if you've ever seen him parody John Barrymore in  Royal Family of Broadway, for which he was up for a Best Actor Oscar but lost, you would also be impressed. He was hardly the lead in this last film, but if they had best supporting role Oscars in 1930 I am sure he would have won. His mimicry of Barrymore's movements and ways were uncanny. It's just a shame that hardly anybody alive has probably ever seen it.

You have to forgive some folks because they tend to derail most of the threads around here.

As for your point that March is forgotten by many studio-era movie fans because of his early work for Paramount and Universal: (I single out studio-era movie fans since 99% of studio-era actors are forgotten by NON studio-era movie fans).

Yes,  those pre-code Paramount films aren't shown by TCM and other networks so that makes them less well known.    I have only seen a few on TCM,  which I assume are the 'hits';  Design for Living, Dr. Jekyell,  The Sign of the Cross,  and The Eagle and the Hawk.    (but TCM has also shown the MGM films he was in from that period).

As for those Universal 40s films:  He didn't make many with the studio, and TCM has shown An Act of Murder,  but yea,  I don't recall seeing Another Part of the Forest or Christopher Columbus. 

Bottom line is that it is largely a myth that March is forgotten by studio-era movies fans.   Maybe not as well known as some other male stars but clearly not forgotten.  

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On 12/1/2017 at 10:24 PM, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, it annoyed me the first time I read some would-be critic writing about which Oscar Best Picture winners were overrated or unjustly forgotten, and one of the ones mentioned as being sub-par was Best Years, which is one of my favorite films of the 1940's. This was several years ago, and since then I've seen it on a few other lists of Worst Best Picture winners! :o

Well, one should not cast pearls before swine, ya know. TBYOOL is a wonderful movie, full of hope and pathos and sentimentality that is genuine and not cloying. Tough subjects like coping with war injuries, dealing with marital issues resulting from separation and other issues are tackled with taste and aplomb. Only a real dunce would rate this film as unworthy of any awards so why ask why. Teresa Wright as a woman out to save Dana Andrews from a faulty marriage, was revolutionary at the time probably, and the film even has the grace of Hoagie Carmichael to lend a musical note to the proceedings. It's a time honored classic and who cares what some critic who probably is a dolt thinks. I always watch a bit of it when it's on and am always rewarded, Lawrence as I'm sure you are too being that you appreciate artistry and talent.

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On 12/1/2017 at 7:03 PM, Bethluvsfilms said:

He was an excellent actor, who always turned in a great performance (even in movies that were a little beneath his talent) yet I noticed he isn't as well known as Tracy, Bogart, Cagney, Fonda, Flynn, etc.

Which is a shame because he was considered one of the best actors during the hey day of the 30's up to the 60's, yet he is mostly forgotten today (only classic film viewers really know who he is).

He's not forgotten by me. I enjoy almost all his early and late in career films, like his Jekyll and Hyde take which to me is the best on film and much later his Paddy Chayefsky take on "Middle of the Night". I do think being that he was not often playing the anti-hero which became more attractive to later film fans, might be part of the issue, but though you can lead a horse to water ya can't make them drink any more than you can force a supposed movie fan to like an old time actor, no matter how talented and acclaimed they were in their day. Hence it is up to the fan of such a talent to tout their films for those who might skip such fodder because they only are aware of the bigger, more famous folks like Gable, Bogart, Flynn. Look at a major talent like Tyrone Power who is not particularly revered today yet is an incredible actor and could even play the Geek in "Nightmare Alley".

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3 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Well, one should not cast pearls before swine, ya know. TBYOOL is a wonderful movie, full of hope and pathos and sentimentality that is genuine and not cloying. Tough subjects like coping with war injuries, dealing with marital issues resulting from separation and other issues are tackled with taste and aplomb. Only a real dunce would rate this film as unworthy of any awards so why ask why. Teresa Wright as a woman out to save Dana Andrews from a faulty marriage, was revolutionary at the time probably, and the film even has the grace of Hoagie Carmichael to lend a musical note to the proceedings. It's a time honored classic and who cares what some critic who probably is a dolt thinks. I always watch a bit of it when it's on and am always rewarded, Lawrence as I'm sure you are too being that you appreciate artistry and talent.

BRAVO, CG! BRAVO!

Couldn't have stated such a wonderful rebuke of those who would dare diminish the quality of MY FAVORITE MOVIE OF ALL TIME, myself.

(...I always knew you had taste and style there, lady) ;)

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Yes, the thought that Fredric March(btw, you folks have NO idea how impressed I've been that no one in this thread has yet misspelled the man's given name by spelling it "Frederick" or "Frederic"...YOU know, like how some people insist of spelling a certain actress' name "Sally Fields"...ah, but I digress...and of course how I'm want to so often do with all these thread sidetrackings of mine around here, huh...LOL...now, where was I here...oh yeah) being "forgotten" by the GENERAL public is true, and which I believe was the OP Beth's original point here.

BUT, the thought that March is somehow "forgotten" by us around here--in most cases being people who are fairly well-versed in the subject of studio era Hollywood and the actors and actresses who plied their craft in the films being made within that system--would definitely be a falsehood.

 

 

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On 12/2/2017 at 12:01 AM, Dargo said:

IAWL has also been another favorite of mine since years before it was "rediscovered" by the general public, Beth. Yep, all the way back to the late-'60s and when I discovered it one afternoon after school on a local Los Angeles television matinee movie program.

However, and while the Capra film is a first rate production, I've always felt that TBYOOL is a far more "relevant"(for want of a better word) film, in so much as its story of returning battle-scarred veterans and their difficult transition back into civilian life, and in a way regardless the war or era, just seems more of a timeless story than one featuring an angel(with or without wings) sent down from Heaven in order to enlighten a guy who's frustrated with his life.

(...but STILL I have to admit, EVERY damn time Harry Bailey gives his little toast to his older brother at the end of the Capra flick, I'm a blubbering freakin' mess, alright!) ;)

LOL

Dar, and here I thought the parts that brought a tear to your dilated pupils, were anytime Sam Wainwright says "Hee Haw", or Alfalfa gets the dance floor to pull back and expose the pool, or when we find out that Violet was headed toward a life on the streets as a paid harpie? Thanks for clearing this up...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNKQkbBhgBc

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