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1 hour ago, starliteyes said:

One of the songs from this film that became a standard was sung by the male star of the film, who would go on to have a lengthy career in the movies, but not in musicals.

" Swingin the Jinx Away"--  Born To Dance by Cole Porter

( just a guess)

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6 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

Excellent guess, Princess, because you got it right!

And now it's your turn.

Now, what kind of a tap dancer would I be if I couldn't get a question about Eleanor Powell's "Born To Dance" right?

Rap tap on wood.

Star-- Thank you for this question. I shall return.

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That's from "Bonjour, Paris" from the 1957 movie "Funny Face".  It, however, was written by Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe, not the Gershwins.  It was sung by Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson, and Audrey Hepburn as they walked around Paris.

 

Princess, when you lived in Paris, did you ever try to do that same walking tour, singing all the way of course?

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46 minutes ago, MilesArcher said:

That's from "Bonjour, Paris" from the 1957 movie "Funny Face".  It, however, was written by Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe, not the Gershwins.  It was sung by Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson, and Audrey Hepburn as they walked around Paris.

 

Princess, when you lived in Paris, did you ever try to do that same walking tour, singing all the way of course?

Miles, I did it all except, I never had the guts to go all the way to the top of the Eiffel Tower. I only made it halfway.

What's going on with you, is it too hot to play golf?

Anyway, it's great to have you back full time or I guess I should say back in the saddle again.

Bonsoir, Miles and it's your turn.....

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Princess, as hot as it is, we had a two week tournament at my golf club and Sunday I shot my best round in several years.  I finished second in my division by one stroke, one lousy stroke!  Oh well, back to the boards. 

Let's continue with our French theme with this next one:

Est-ce que
Parce que
Vous m'aimez? 
 

 

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2 hours ago, MilesArcher said:

Princess, as hot as it is, we had a two week tournament at my golf club and Sunday I shot my best round in several years.  I finished second in my division by one stroke, one lousy stroke!  Oh well, back to the boards. 

Let's continue with our French theme with this next one:

Est-ce que
Parce que
Vous m'aimez? 
 

 

"Dites-Moi"-- South Pacific by Rodgers and Hammerstein

Miles: Congratulations on the golf and congratulations on the perfect French.

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The song is The Song Is You by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein from Music in the Air.  I believe it was also a number that was deleted from Till the Clouds Roll By, in which it would have been sung by Kathryn Grayson.

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9 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

The song is The Song Is You by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein from Music in the Air.  I believe it was also a number that was deleted from Till the Clouds Roll By, in which it would have been sung by Kathryn Grayson.

Star, the song was also deleted from "Music in the Air". Frank Sinatra performed it on his famous TV special "A Man and his Music". Also, It was the last song that Frank Sinatra sang with Tommy Dorsey. You can hear that performance on YouTube.

Star, this was easy, but I wanted to do it because it's such a beautiful song that you don't hear often enough.

Now, I've got to go because for some reason smoke got in my eyes.

Star, it's all yours.....

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4 hours ago, starliteyes said:

Song was sung by one of the female stars of this 1950's musical.

Jack Cole was one of the innovators in jazz dance choreography in the 1950s. He choreographed " Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and in particular this number was a favorite of his, "Ain't there anyone here for love?

It was sung by Jane Russell and written by Hoagy Carmichael and Harold Adamson.

 if you think the number is sexy, I will tell you that Jack Cole had all of his male dancers rehearse in the nude.

 That way he could tell whether or not they were making any mistakes in technique.

And who said the 1950s were dull?

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Oh, that's an easy one.  It's Well, Did You Evah!, sung by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in High Society.  It was originally introduced in 1939 by Betty Grable and future film director Charles Walters in the Broadway production of Du Barry Was a Lady.

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12 minutes ago, starliteyes said:

Oh, that's an easy one.  It's Well, Did You Evah!, sung by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in High Society.  It was originally introduced in 1939 by Betty Grable and future film director Charles Walters in the Broadway production of Du Barry Was a Lady.

Oh, this isn't meant to be hard. It's one of my favorite and really my first Cole Porter song. And of course, I only know it from " High Society ". Like all Cole Porter songs from Broadway, the original lyrics are a lot more fun and risque'. LOL

And now Star, you can continue this swellegant, elegant party..... your turn!

 

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