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The song and the movie are both called "Going My Way".  The song was written by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen for the 1944 movie.  Bing Crosby sang it and won a Best Actor Oscar.  Here is a recording by Bing:

 

 

 

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Very helpful hint, Miles.  The song is Rose Marie, music composed by Rudolf Friml and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein and Otto Harbach.  Nelson Eddy sang it to Jeanette MacDonald in - what else? - Rose Marie.

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Correct, Starlit.  Of course, the remake had Howard Keel and Ann Blyth, but everyone remembers this original:

 

 

Like Nelson said, "It didn't work with Maude, but then nothing works with Maude!"

You're up next. Starlit. 

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Thanks, Miles.  Due to computer problems (I'm using someone else's computer at the moment) and other issues going on right now, I may not be showing up with any regularity on these boards for a while.  So to keep things moving along, I'm leaving this thread open.

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On 11/7/2020 at 9:34 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#1-- From the debut movie of a big classic musical movie star

Hint # 3-- The director of this musical also directed a very successful Fred Astaire musical--

NOT associated with RKO or Ginger Rogers.

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On 11/1/2020 at 9:17 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Next:

" I've A Conviction That I Must Be Wrong

 Stranger Than Fiction

You Happened Along"

 

On 11/7/2020 at 9:34 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#1-- From the debut movie of a big classic musical movie star

 

On 11/8/2020 at 6:13 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#2-- The star was from a foreign country.

 

On 11/10/2020 at 1:33 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint # 3-- The director of this musical also directed a very successful Fred Astaire musical--

NOT associated with RKO or Ginger Rogers.

A Brief Review

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On 11/1/2020 at 9:17 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Next:

" I've A Conviction That I Must Be Wrong

 Stranger Than Fiction

You Happened Along"

The star of the musical starred In 9 consecutive musicals for the same major Studio.

This song was the title song of the first musical in the long series.

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On 11/16/2020 at 3:47 PM, Princess of Tap said:

The star of the musical starred In 9 consecutive musicals for the same major Studio.

This song was the title song of the first musical in the long series.

The very big hint now--

20th Century Fox Mogul Darryl F Zanuck discovered this musical star, coming from a foreign country, who made a lot of money for his Studio.

But in the 9 consecutive musicals that the performer starred in,

the star neither primarily sang nor danced,  nor played a musical instrument to entertain the audience.

Our Song lyrics are from that performer's first starring movie-- the name of the song is the same as the name of the movie.

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Princess, I wish that you had given us that very big hint a little earlier.  It would have saved me a lot of time.  I first thought of Leslie Caron because her debut film, "An American In Paris" was directed by Vincente Minnelli, who directed Fred in "The Band Wagon".  However, the other clues didn't fit.  I checked out Carmen Miranda, and Canadian born actresses Deanna Durbin and Ruby Keeler, but I had to rule them out too.

The answer that I came up with is the song "One In A Million" from the 1936 movie of the same name.  I checked IMDB to find that the song was written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Lew Pollack.   It was sung by an actress named Leah Ray with an all female band.

The star making her Hollywood debut was Sonja Henie.  Once you said that the star did not sing, dance, or play an instrument, Sonja came immediately to mind.  The movie was directed by Sidney Lanfield who later directed Fred in "You'll Never Get Rich" with Rita Hayworth.

I couldn't find a short clip, but if you watch the first three minutes of this video, you will see the song being performed.  

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, MilesArcher said:

Princess, I wish that you had given us that very big hint a little earlier.  It would have saved me a lot of time.  I first thought of Leslie Caron because her debut film, "An American In Paris" was directed by Vincente Minnelli, who directed Fred in "The Band Wagon".  However, the other clues didn't fit.  I checked out Carmen Miranda, and Canadian born actresses Deanna Durbin and Ruby Keeler, but I had to rule them out too.

The answer that I came up with is the song "One In A Million" from the 1936 movie of the same name.  I checked IMDB to find that the song was written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Lew Pollack.   It was sung by an actress named Leah Ray with an all female band.

The star making her Hollywood debut was Sonja Henie.  Once you said that the star did not sing, dance, or play an instrument, Sonja came immediately to mind.  The movie was directed by Sidney Lanfield who later directed Fred in "You'll Never Get Rich" with Rita Hayworth.

I couldn't find a short clip, but if you watch the first three minutes of this video, you will see the song being performed.  

 

 

 

 

Whatever else that can be said about Sonja Henie, she was a fabulous figure skater and a pioneer in the sport as an art.

Miles, many thanks and you are one in a million! Your turn.....

 

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This next one is a bit different.  It's  a twofer.  That is, there are two songs by the same songwriter that are in two different movies made more than fifteen years apart.  The last line of one song is the same as the first line of the other song.  

The line is:

"It's a lovely day" 

Can you identify both songs, the movies they came from, the singers, and the songwriter?

Please don't bother to answer unless you know both songs.  If one person gets one song and another person gets the other one, we won't know who to give the thread to for the next question.  Thanks.

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Irving Berlin wrote Isn’t This a Lovely Day to Be Caught in the Rain? (have always loved that song), which Fred Astaire sang to Ginger Rogers in Top Hat.  The last line of the song islong as I can be with you, it’s a lovely day.” 

That was in 1935.  In 1953, Donald O’Connor sang Irving Berlin’s It’s a Lovely Day Today to Vera-Ellen in Call Me Madam.  The opening line of the song is the same as the title. 

Irving Berlin seemed to have a thing for lovely days.  He also wrote It’s a Lovely Day Tomorrow for Louisiana Purchase. 

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Well, we know that Cole Porter wrote it.  The song is "Hey Babe, Hey" from the 1936 movie "Born To Dance", which was shown on TCM just a few days ago.  It was sung and danced to by most of the cast with Buddy Ebsen singing to lyrics in question.  It was hard to find a clip because the YouTube clip is mislabeled.  Here it is:

 

 

 

 

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