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Thanks, Starlit.  Now, here is one that all of you should know:

Ridin' the range once more,

Totin' my old forty-four,

Where you sleep out every night,

And the only law is right 

 

It was actually featured in several movies. but it is really associated with one singer.

Oh yes,

Happy Thanksgiving from Rep. Grant Wehrli, Shop Small this Holiday Season  

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I've waited a very long time and given some giveaway clues,  and no one has even ventured a guess.  Am I the only one on these boards who  watches old westerns?  The song is Back In The Saddle Again.  It was the theme song of Gene Autry for many years.  It was actually written by Ray Whitley, a singer/songwriter/actor.   He usually played singing sidekicks in "B" westerns.  He sang it in a 1938 movie called Border G-Man that starred George O'Brien.  Gene Autry was not in the movie, but he liked the song and together with Ray Whitley, revised it a little.  Gene sang it in a 1939 movie called Rovin' Tumbleweeds.  It became Gene's theme song on his radio show in 1940.  In 1941 he sang it in a movie called, strangely enough, Back In The Saddle.  Later it became the theme song of his TV series.  

 

 

  

Now, let's try one that may be more familiar.

Have you heard? It's in the stars
Next July we collide with Mars. 

 

It's not from a western!

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, MilesArcher said:

Well, I've waited a very long time and given some giveaway clues,  and no one has even ventured a guess.  Am I the only one on these boards who  watches old westerns?  The song is Back In The Saddle Again.  It was the theme song of Gene Autry for many years.  It was actually written by Ray Whitley, a singer/songwriter/actor.   He usually played singing sidekicks in "B" westerns.  He sang it in a 1938 movie called Border G-Man that starred George O'Brien.  Gene Autry was not in the movie, but he liked the song and together with Ray Whitley, revised it a little.  Gene sang it in a 1939 movie called Rovin' Tumbleweeds.  It became Gene's theme song on his radio show in 1940.  In 1941 he sang it in a movie called, strangely enough, Back In The Saddle.  Later it became the theme song of his TV series.  

 

  

Now, let's try one that may be more familiar.

Have you heard? It's in the stars
Next July we collide with Mars. 

 

It's not from a western!

 

 

 

 

 

Those lyrics are from a Cole Porter song called:

"Well, Did You Evah!", which he wrote for his 1939 Broadway show "Du Barry Was A Lady".

Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra reprised it for "High Society" in 1956.

BTW, Miles, the very sophisticated High Society Cole Porter did write a western tune once called "Don't Fence Me In", which had some success for him in the movies.

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Very good, Princess.  "High Society" was just shown on TCM on Tuesday.  Here are Bing and Frank:

 

 

And by the way, Princess,   "Don't Fence Me In" was performed by another of my western favorites, Roy Rogers, in "Hollywood Canteen".  His partner was a four-legged tap dancer, which even you will agree is something you don't often see.

 

   

 It's your turn now, Princess.

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On 12/12/2020 at 5:13 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#2-- The song is from a 1940s movie.

 

On 12/11/2020 at 10:59 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Hint#1-- The song was written by 2 songwriters who are well-known for their Broadway hits and their Hollywood movies--

However they are Not known as a team.

Hint#3-- The song was sung by a movie star not noted for their singing.

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I'm surprised that no one has gotten it yet.  The song is "They're Either Too Young Or Too Old".  It was written by Frank Loesser and Arthur Schwartz for the 1943 movie "Thank Your Lucky Stars", and it was sung, and danced to a little, by Bette Davis.  Check out this clip:

 

 

Strangely, Bette wasn't called upon to sing or dance a lot in future films. 

 

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Actually I have heard this one recently while watching Sunny Side Up.  It's If I Had a Talking Picture of You and was sung by Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell and was written by DeSylva, Henderson and Brown.  From 1929, this was an early original musical comedy written for the screen.  Janet Gaynor may not have been the greatest singer or dancer, but she had lots of charm.

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The song is "Innamorata" from the 1955 movie "Artists And Models".  It was written by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks and sung by Dean Martin in a scene with Dorothy Malone and Shirley MacLaine.  Later it is sung by Shirley in a scene with Jerry Lewis.

Check out this clip:

 

 

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