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Yes, Starlit.  When Princess said "Miles, a little hint please", I was trying to tell her and others that she had inadvertently mentioned the title.

It was a big hit for Bing in 1932.  Here is a clip:

 

 

 

Nice work, Starlit,   It's your turn now.

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This one's just a little bit obscure.  The song is "Never Swat A Fly".  which, I believe, is a favorite song of Mike Pence.  It was written by the team of DeSylva, Brown, and Henderson for the 1930 film "Just Imagine".  I wish that TCM would show it if it's available.  It's a science fiction musical comedy made in 1930 but set way into the future in 1980.  People have numbers instead of names and they travel in planes instead of cars.   The movie features a young Maureen O'Sullivan actually singing several years before her first Tarzan movie.  The song was performed by Frank Albertson and Marjorie White as you will see in this clip:

 

 

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You got it, Miles!  It's a very bizarre musical to say the least, but I thought the Never Swat a Fly number was kind of cute.  Actually it's the only song I can remember, although I know there were some others.

Now it's your turn.

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I had hoped somebody else would answer this, but since no one has…

The song is Oh, You Beautiful Doll, written by Nay Ayer and A. Seymour Brown in 1911.  Its been featured in at least a half a dozen films.  I don’t know which one you were going for, Miles; so I’ll just list them all chronologically.

In 1939, it was sung by a male chorus and danced to by Frances Mercer in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle.

In 1942, George Murphy sang it to Judy Garland in For Me and My Gal, and then they both danced to it.  (This is the rendition of it with which I am most familiar.)

In 1944, it was heard again in another movie with George Murphy, only this time it was sung by Charles Winninger.  The film was Broadway Rhythm.

In 1949, it was the title of a June Haver musical, but it was sung by Gale Robbins.

In 1953, it was featured in The Eddie Cantor Story, with Keefe Brasselle portraying Eddie Cantor. 

I’m not 100% certain, but it may have also been heard in another 1953 biopic, The I Don’t Care Girl, starring Mitzi Gaynor as Eva Tanguay.

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To the surprise of no one, Starlit is correct again.  Many musicals of the late thirties and early forties were set in the years just prior to World War I and they needed vintage songs of that era.  Twentieth Century Fox made quite a few of these films, but the one that first came to mind was the MGM film from 1942.  Here is a clip:

 

 

I purposely posted an easy one, hoping for more participation, but it didn't happen.  We'll keep on plugging away.  Starliteyes, you're up next.  

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The song is "Between You And Me".  It was written by Cole Porter and was sung by George Murphy in "Broadway Melody Of 1940".   George and Eleanor Powell then dance to it.  Fred Astaire is the other star of the movie.   Here is a clip:

 

 

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 Thanks,  Now here is one that I've always liked.  Do you know it?

Someday look and you'll find
Two hearts were blessed
Someday fate may be kind
Pray for the future, hope for the best 

 

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I've always liked this song, too, Miles.  It's One Never Knows, Does One?  It was written by Harry Revel and Mack Gordon and sung by Alice Faye in Stowaway.  I don't seem to be able to download clips from youtube like I used to any more, but I'll give it a try anyway.

 

Oh my goodness (as Shirley Temple used to say), it worked!

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It's a little known song from "Meet Me In St. Louis" called "Over The Bannister.  It was written by Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin.  It was sung by Judy Garland in the scene when she asked Tom Drake to stay after the party at her house to help her turn off the lights.

 

 

 

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That is correct, Miles.  Not the first, or even the second song for that matter, that people think of where Meet Me in St. Louis  is concerned, but I always thought it was a nice little song.

And now it's back to you!

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1 hour ago, MilesArcher said:

Thanks.  This one may be familiar.

We should be like a couple of hot tomatoes
But you're as cold as yesterday's mashed  potatoes 

 

 

 

 

"A Fine Romance" from "Swing Time" by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields performed by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers

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Very good, Princess"Swing Time" was just shown very recently on TCM.  Here is a clip:

 

 

Hey, Princess, that's a rarity.  Fred and Ginger sang a duet without any dancing!

Princess, you're up next.  What can you dazzle us with?

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