Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

The song is "Back To Back" by Irving Berlin.    It was sung by Mary Healy in the 1939 film  "Second Fiddle".    Berlin was obviously poking fun at his song "Cheek To Cheek" that he had written for the 1935 film  "Top Hat".    It wasn't easy to find a film clip, but I did.  Here is Mary Healy at about the 9:20 mark of this clip:

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's one that became a familiar song.  It was featured in a thirties musical and was sung by a well known male singer and a woman who would make a few movies, but would become better known for her later TV work.

My heart was a desert

You planted a seed

And this is the flower

This hour of sweet fulfillment 

 

It would become associated with a famous entertainer who was not in the movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That hint really helped, Miles.  It could only be Love in Bloom, which became associated with Jack Benny, even though it was first introduced by Bing Crosby in She Loves Me Not.  Music by Ralph Rainger, lyrics by Leo Robin.  Here's Bing singing it to Kitty Carlisle:

  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good, Starlit, and you get to post the next one..  That movie was from 1934 and a year later there was a movie called "Love In Bloom" that featured George Burns and Gracie Allen, as well as Bing Crosby's wife, Dixie Lee, but the song "Love In Bloom" was not there.   I wondered how it came to be associated with Jack Benny.  I found this when I looked up www.jackbenny.org.

 

Can it be the trees
That fill the breeze
With rare and magic perfume?
Oh no, it isn't the trees
It's Love In Bloom...

Not so much in bloom as over-ripe. It was by the team of Robin & Rainger - Leo Robin (words), Ralph Rainger (music) - who would go on to win the award four years later with "Thanks For The Memory". This time around they lost, yet the song stuck around for 40 years due to a happy accident. One night, while Crosby's record was still a big hit, Jack Benny and his wife Mary Livingstone wandered into a nightclub, and the bandleader invited Benny, a competent violinist, to sit in on the next number. It happened to be "Love In Bloom", so Jack borrowed a fiddle, played along and it turned up as a squib in a gossip column: "Jack Benny playing 'Love In Bloom' was a breath of fresh air," cracked the wiseacre. "If you like fresh air." A couple of nights later, he and Mary strolled into another supper club, and immediately the orchestra struck up "Love In Bloom". It took off from there, and, when Benny needed a theme for his radio show, it was the obvious choice. And so, every week, on radio and then TV, the intro to Robin & Rainger's lush Bing ballad was inseparable from Don Wilson's warm baritone announcing "It's The Jack Benny Program!", and a rhapsodic love song achieved immortality by being sawed into pieces by a fiddle-playing comic week in, week out, decade after decade. Off-air, Benny could actually play the tune rather well, if anyone had wanted to hear it that way."
 
 
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The song is "You'd Be Hard To Replace".  It was written by Harry Warren and Ira Gershwin for the 1949 film "The Barkleys Of Broadway" and it was sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rogers in their final screen pairing.  Here they are:

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a familiar one:

Your eyes made skies seem blue again
What else could I do again
But keep repeating through and through
"I love you, love you" 

 

Sixty years ago, on April 23rd, 1961, this song was featured in a concert at Carnegie Hall by the person who sang it in a thirties movie.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy Garland sang Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart many times throughout her career, including when she auditioned for MGM.  In 1938, she sang the song that was written by James F. Hanley in Listen, Darling.  Her rendition here was taken in a much slower tempo  than the way in which she usually performed it.  

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good, Starlit.  In your clip, Judy looks very much like she did in your avatar photo.  In this next clip, you will notice that faster tempo that you mentioned.  Here is Judy in the 1960's:

 

 

Nice job, Starlit.  You're up again. 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's "I Know Why (And So Do You)" from Sun Valley Serenade (1941); music by Harry Warren + lyrics by Mack Gordon.  In the movie, it's sung by Pat Friday and the Modernaires, although John Payne actually sings one of the verses.

next:  It rocks my whole solar plexus

(hint: this is actually a duet)

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're correct, Fausterlitz, and now officially the thread is yours.

4 minutes ago, Fausterlitz said:

That's "I Know Why (And So Do You)" from Sun Valley Serenade (1941); music by Harry Warren + lyrics by Mack Gordon.  In the movie, it's sung by Pat Friday and the Modernaires, although John Payne actually sings one of the verses.

next:  It rocks my whole solar plexus

(hint: this is actually a duet)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...