Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Alan Hale, Character Actor Support Par Excellence


Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

One of Hale's trademarks was his great "jaw drop" double-take. Watching him and Flynn on screen together was pure joy. That's one thing that is missing from today's films - chemistry. We have great actors, but it doesn't appear that anybody is really having any fun up on the screen any more.

I agree completely with this, especially in regards to today's actors lacking chemistry.  There are actors who are paired up often in "buddy comedies" (e.g. Mark Wahlberg & Will Ferrell; Jackie Chan & Chris Tucker) but I wouldn't say that they have the same type of chemistry that Flynn and Hale have.  These actors are just funny together.  Of course, this isn't to say that no actors today have chemistry with one another, because there has to be someone.  With Flynn and Hale, you can tell that they truly have fun with one another.  Even though it's a different type of relationship, a pairing like Bogart and Bacall, you can tell that they care for one another, they're not just two actors pretending to be in love.  While Flynn and Hale are obviously not the same type of relationship as Bogart and Bacall, you can tell that Flynn and Hale care for one another. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a little surprised at how few photos seem to be available on the internet of father and son. They sure were lookalikes.

11678d881f4381fb67228935eda32449--alan-h

4e97106875dba96d6ff7da18fc7d66f4.jpg

069a64e8b806b64e0669946bd151c0ba.jpg

2c16a9e4f1bf2de4deec6069678cec83.jpg

Gretchen Hartman, Alan Jr.'s mother and Alan Sr.'s wife of over 30 years (she died in 1979).

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another good on

At first WB's didn't what to see this cuffle but it linked anyway-(shown the absaulte must have "Life: GOES TO THE MOVIES" my first movie book, gotten around 1978/79) & ALERT! For those wanting to get this ultimate Golden Age of Hollywood & Studio-Sytem-(circa 19825 to 1960)ead & apparatly to 2 detesed each other as I've written many times for  It also has a simutineous companion pc docu from 1974 "LIFE: Goes to the Moes"  I actual;ly got it a a gift mom Madre, around '79 too & it's among those related that truly made in love with CINEMA!"

 

Recap, Raft detested Edward G.-(though the far superior thespian) by farm, but was a milqtoast, even having to have his lids open where firing a pistol when he had  his eyelids open no lease. & w/blank no less   Well the truth tough guys from "Hell Kitchen" hated It & during this scene hactually flatlland EdwardG. Though atill a good movie (***-out of 4)   Of all the tremendous Warner Bros.0 gangsters, I will always vote for *Cagney! *Bogey a runner-up, though hit was never a true guy though either-(see *Cagney "Autobiography)  But AFI's A #I all-time favoirite male star *BOGEY-(l999 poll), was also not a true tough guy either   PRETTY GOOD TPOC

 

 

During that glorious wra WB's gagster rules & *Bette Davis was said to then be the "Queen of The WB's ;pt

 

Visaited there in a tram in November of '99 & I can' suggest enough for it's Museum

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm a little surprised at how few photos seem to be available on the internet of father and son. They sure were lookalikes.

11678d881f4381fb67228935eda32449--alan-h

 

On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 2:37 PM, speedracer5 said:

I agree completely with this, especially in regards to today's actors lacking chemistry.  There are actors who are paired up often in "buddy comedies" (e.g. Mark Wahlberg & Will Ferrell; Jackie Chan & Chris Tucker) but I wouldn't say that they have the same type of chemistry that Flynn and Hale have.  These actors are just funny together.  Of course, this isn't to say that no actors today have chemistry with one another, because there has to be someone.  With Flynn and Hale, you can tell that they truly have fun with one another.  Even though it's a different type of relationship, a pairing like Bogart and Bacall, you can tell that they care for one another, they're not just two actors pretending to be in love.  While Flynn and Hale are obviously not the same type of relationship as Bogart and Bacall, you can tell that Flynn and marvelous care of his horseHale care for one another.   Hale, Jr. was the dad of Alan Hale,Jr._  MONTO REVPOUSPLI E I.    SHE NOW MOST HER WORKBUIT BOOTS!  THAT NYO DOUY THINK THOUGH? & THE FDAMR CABNNIe ence ahgin to overtailler 1940 "

Given it's not onlyESPASCT, PLEASE READ IT FIRST & I enjoy *Ronney 1940 vision longest in the waing & of course GIRL!)

069a64e8b806b64e0669946bd151c0ba.jpg

2c16a9e4f1bf2de4deec6069678cec83.jpg

Gretchen Hartman, Alan Jr.'s mother and Alan Sr.'s wife of over 30 years (she died in 1979).

Yet another during that era, the regular charcter players at their pinnecal & only my favs were  *Walter Brennan-(l894-7974)-(NOTE: The all-time character during the period were mainly there, the puff up tle leads

*Tracy's strongest fullfleged cactered actor>carracter work you decade   Full stars for star  on a fw he list abopve, & as usual than you with joing us on here-(NOTE: IF THERE ANY WAY CAN PLEEESE JOIN-IN NOT ONLY WITHIN THE FINEST FORUMS OF ALL-TIOM & YOIU PREDIX FOR VERY SOON *OSCARS???0)

 

Though he wanderous & given people to do want to wear shorts, pajama's, tacky shoes. who is lie CARY GRANT today???

 

 

(TIVIA: "The Great: Tracy" always thought himself on thou?)

Essential caractrer players":- No. #1 *Walter Brennan, Ward Bond (*1930-l960) & never even nommed?)

#3rd fav *Walter Breann_(staggering now holds all-time record for most total screen personers!  (*Oscar champ *Breenan 1940's "The Weterner"

 

VS. my pix for "Essantial *TRACY Essential!  fesinata Christmas    Vince     pictured his all-0tyime favs.   "King King" 9l933), "Coal Miuner's Daughter"       AM HABING A PEARC

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm a little surprised at how few photos seem to be available on the internet of father and son. They sure were lookalikes.

11678d881f4381fb67228935eda32449--alan-h

4e97106875dba96d6ff7da18fc7d66f4.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

They truly look like they could have been twins, if not for the age difference. They voices also sounded very much similar too I thought.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

They truly look like they could have been twins, if not for the age difference. They voices also sounded very much similar too I thought.

Have to say though that every time I see pictures of Alan Jr. as a young man, or spot him in a movie at that age, he's always somehow reminded me of a slightly beefier Van Johnson.

(...and especially so whenever I see that above photo of him with his father)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...

I see that TCM is showing ACTION IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC tomorrow at 5:45pm (EST).

This made me think of how this Warner Bros. film benefits from, among other things, lovely character support from one of the studio's great stalwart performers, Alan Hale. In view of that I thought it might be time to revive this old thread devoted to one of the best character actors Hollywood ever had.

Action In The North Atlantic (1943) -- (Movie Clip) My Dear Adolf - Turner  Classic Movies

Action in the North Atlantic (1943) , Lloyd Bacon, Alan Hale, | Jack  palance, Lloyd, Jack elam

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hale didn't seem to come out of his shell until he repeated his role of Little John in Curtiz' ROBIN HOOD.  Up until then he was mostly seen as either villainous or pseudo-brutish. Even in OUR RELATIONS with Laurel and Hardy he played it mostly straight. But after ROBIN HOOD all bets were off and his natural charm and gregariousness made him a favorite of co-workers and audiences alike.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

Hale didn't seem to come out of his shell until he repeated his role of Little John in Curtiz' ROBIN HOOD.  Up until then he was mostly seen as either villainous or pseudo-brutish. Even in OUR RELATIONS with Laurel and Hardy he played it mostly straight. But after ROBIN HOOD all bets were off and his natural charm and gregariousness made him a favorite of co-workers and audiences alike.

I have to agree with this statement, Ray, though he was very good in Stella Dallas made at Goldwyn around the same time that he signed on with Warner Brothers. At Warners, though, he loosened up as a performer, playing gregarious, perpetually laughing or cheery types, often good friends (or a little later) fathers to the leading man. I think, in retrospect, that Hale's peak period at the studio, when he had his best roles in top studio productions, was from 1938 (Robin Hood) to 1942 (Gentleman Jim). During this period Hale's charm and personality seriously competed with that of many leading men. No wonder Errol Flynn later called him (affectionately) the most feared character actor in Hollywood as far as scene stealing was concerned.

For some reason after 1942 Warners, while still casting Hale in a lot of productions, was no longer using him as well as they had previously. He was appearing in a lot of minor productions, musicals, westerns, dramas, but often with less screen time than before and in roles lacking the substance of, say, Jimmy Cagney's scalawag father in The Strawberry Blonde or laughing Ed Carlsen in They Drive By Night. At least he was reunited with Flynn one last time in Adventures of Don Juan in 1948. Hale was more subdued in this film than he had been previously but the two actors still had that marvelous screen chemistry which brought more to their scenes than it would have if those roles had been played by other actors.

According to one source Flynn suffered depression following Hale's death in January, 1950.

Here they are talking on the Don Juan set:

errolflynnx | Errol flynn, Errol, Classic movie stars

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though he didn't have the career that his father had, and will forever be known as the Skipper of TV's GILLIGAN'S ISLAND, I do think that Alan Hale Jr. inherited a lot of his father's charm and charisma.

I mean even when he was yelling at Gilligan (which was most of the time and usually with good reason) you just had to love the Skipper because you could tell that  he had much affection and devotion to his 'little buddy' even if he did drive him crazy every episode.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Must've been a "thing" with Hale Jr.    Saw an old ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW episode in which Hale Jr. played a farmer who came into Mayberry to find a wife, and often referred to Barney Fife as "little buddy".    And not too long ago (but long enough to forget the show)  as a guest on another old TV show where Hale Jr. too, called somebody "little buddy". 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

He worked with Colbert again as the contractor who sort of willingly gets duped into setting up her restaurant business in the original Imitation of Life. I also don't mind watching Hale, Jr. in his pre-Skipper roles in the movies such as It Happened on Fifth Avenue. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

He worked with Colbert again as the contractor who sort of willingly gets duped into setting up her restaurant business in the original Imitation of Life. I also don't mind watching Hale, Jr. in his pre-Skipper roles in the movies such as It Happened on Fifth Avenue. 

Get-TV is showing Casey Jones,  a late 50s T.V. show about trains that stars Hale Jr. and Dub Taylor.     The first time I even heard of the show was when I ran into it last month.

The show isn't that good but it does feature some guest actors that are familiar.      It only lasted for 32 episodes. 

 

Tv Theme Casey Jones - YouTube

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

As many know, Alan Hale was the only actor to play Little John three times in the movies, over a span of 27 years. His final screen role, in fact, was as that character in Rogues of Sherwood Forest, an otherwise forgettable adventure programmer, featuring John Derek. It's been a long time since I saw this one, with Alan Hale's comforting presence probably the film's main virtue.

Alan Hale, Sr. played Little John opposite two of cinema's most famous  Robin Hoods: Douglas Fairbanks in 1922 and Errol Flynn in 1938:  silentmoviegifs

DIANA LYNN JOHN DEREK ALAN HALE ROGUES OF SHERWOOD FOREST (1950 Stock Photo  - Alamy

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, TomJH said:

As many know, Alan Hale was the only actor to play Little John three times in the movies

Because he was the only guy in Hollywood who could rock those tights!

4e97106875dba96d6ff7da18fc7d66f4.jpg

Seriously though, while Alan Jr resembles his father he was truly far more handsome....with his looks & talent he should have been a successful romantic lead in Hollywood movies. Why didn't he have similar career to Michael Caine or George Segal? Truly a waste of talent he ended up on schlocky TV shows & Underground type movies.

And WHY do guys seem to choose jackets 2 sizes too big? I see this all the time in old Hollywood movies. You can clearly see where his real shoulders are, yet the shoulder seam of the jacket hangs over the biceps. It really looks stupid.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

Seriously though, while Alan Jr resembles his father he was truly far more handsome....with his looks & talent he should have been a successful romantic lead in Hollywood movies. Why didn't he have similar career to Michael Caine or George Segal? Truly a waste of talent he ended up on schlocky TV shows & Underground type movies.

 

Quite frankly, while Alan Hale Jr. was a likable and engaging actor (after all, who doesn't like the Skipper?) I never thought he demonstrated the same acting skill or range as his father. Maybe he came along too late and just didn't get the same opportunities, having to settle on sit com television work. (I vaguely recall watching him as Casey Jones on Saturday mornings as a kid where, as in Gilligan's Island, his playing was pretty broad).

Alan Sr, however, pretty much did it all in the movies, even directing a few features. Early in his career he was often a villain or heavy, once even a sexual predator of Garbo in an early talkie. Later, though, during his prime years at Warners he became one of the most familiar and beloved of all character actors, wonderful as comic support, but he could convincingly play drama, too.

I love watching Hale, for example, as roughneck Steve Gillis in Adventures of Mark Twain, in the middle section of the film depicting Twain's gold prospecting days which ends up with a recreation of the leaping frog of Calaveras County incident. Hale plays the partner of Twain (wonderfully played by Fredric March) in these scenes, responsible for loading buckshot down a rival frog's throat in order to rig the frog jumping contest. Hale brings a mischievous, little boy glee to his scenes that is irresistible. Unfortunately, Hale's character disappears from the film after this comical interlude and the rest of the film is never quite as entertaining again. Other character actors like John Carradine and Percy Kilbride certainly add to the scene, as well, but Hale's contribution is paramount.

Image 1 - FREDRIC MARCH, ALAN HALE still ADVENTURES OF MARK TWAIN 1944 vint orig near MINT

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Quite frankly, while Alan Hale Jr. was a likable and engaging actor (after all, who doesn't like the Skipper?) (ME, TOM) I never thought he demonstrated the same acting skill or range as his father. Maybe he came along too late and just didn't get the same opportunities, having to settle on sit com television work.

I agree 100%. I can imagine the scenario where Jr may have been typecast as a one-note charactor. I also can imagine his Dad mentoring him and warning Jr of the pitfalls of the business he may have witnessed or experienced. 60's film making took a backseat to TV and Jr may have thought The Skipper was a good safe career move. But he was young, vivacious & handsome with a likable personality. Although I don't care for the charactor, Jr couldn't have been such a standout charactor as the Skipper without talent. 

I think of Henry Winkler the same way. He was a breakout charactor as Fonzie because he's just full of talent & knows how to craft success. He and William Shatner both continued working, but never with the huge success they saw in that one signature character they're known for. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched John Ford's The Lost Patrol a couple of months ago and was surprised to see that Alan Hale's name was on the cast credits. I couldn't recall that he was in the film but as I watched the film I understood why I didn't remember. While he played one of the soldiers under Victor McLaglen's command trying to survive the desert and the faceless Arab enemy, he doesn't have a single line of dialogue. I believe he may have grunted once in reply to a statement. Nor do I recall he has a single closeup. What a complete waste of a great character actor, I thought.

THE LOST PATROL, center, from left, Victor McLaglen, Boris Karloff, Alan  Hale, Sr., Reginald Denny, 1934 Stock Photo - Alamy

If you can spot Hale in the background of this shot that's about as good as it gets for seeing him in The Lost Patrol

Hale would do much better this same year when Capra gave him a small role as the singing road thief who picks up hitchhikers Colbert and Gable in It Happened One Night.

Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert and Alan Hale, Sr - It Happened One Night,  1934 | It happened one night, Classic movies, Hollywood

Thank goodness things turned around for him when he signed on with Warner Brothers three years later at a studio that could appreciate what a great talent he had. Mind you, as Ray Faiola commented a few posts earlier, it was only at this studio, starting with his portrayal in Robin Hood, that he finally seemed to come out of his shell as an actor and became the great ebullient character actor for which he is cherished by so many film buffs today.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I agree 100%. I can imagine the scenario where Jr may have been typecast as a one-note charactor. I also can imagine his Dad mentoring him and warning Jr of the pitfalls of the business he may have witnessed or experienced. 60's film making took a backseat to TV and Jr may have thought The Skipper was a good safe career move. But he was young, vivacious & handsome with a likable personality. Although I don't care for the charactor, Jr couldn't have been such a standout charactor as the Skipper without talent. 

 

Hale's chemistry with Bob Denver helped a lot too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the more interesting photographs you will see of a real life incident on a Hollywood sound stage is this confrontation that broke out between Edward G. Robinson and George Raft while making Manpower (1941). The two actors did not get along with Raft (apparently resentful of his third billing in the film and seeing Robinson as a romantic rival, believe it or not, for co-star Marlene Dietrich whom he fancied) verbally berating Robinson with profanities before the cast and crew on numerous occasions. The final result was this physical altercation between the two happening, the moment captured by a photographer.

What I find interesting here is the familiar white curly hair of Alan Hale in the background, his arms around Robinson, trying to break up the fight. And this is the way that I like to think of Hale, as a good guy in a pinch doing the right thing by trying to settle things down. By the gleeful expression on Ward Bond's face, on the other hand, he might not be the best person to rely upon when cooler heads are required.

e3de496a9865c6837180a420b23ff006%2B%25281%2529.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

MV5BZmE0NDZiZDEtOGJmNy00NmJkLWFiMTgtYjJj

There are lots of Alan Hale films that I enjoyed much more but I think one of his very best performances came in the Helen Hayes 1931 film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet.

248 acting credits on the imdb!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

 

There are lots of Alan Hale films that I enjoyed much more but I think one of his very best performances came in the Helen Hayes 1931 film, The Sin of Madelon Claudet.

248 acting credits on the imdb!

Thanks, Bogie. I haven't seen this film but perhaps I should. I didn't realize Alan Hale was in it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Thanks, Bogie. I haven't seen this film but perhaps I should. I didn't realize Alan Hale was in it.

IMO it is his best performance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Junior was on an episode of The Wild Wild West playing Jim's temporary partner. At the end

Jim asks him where he is going on vacation. St. Louis, San Francisco? No, Junior replies, I'm

going to do something I've always wanted to do. Stay on a desert island all by myself. As he says

this the theme from Gilligan's Island plays for a few seconds. This was a couple of years after

GI went off the air.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the more interesting photographs you will see of a real life incident on a Hollywood sound stage is this confrontation that broke out between Edward G. Robinson and George Raft while making Manpower (1941). The two actors did not get along with Raft (apparently resentful of his third billing in the film and seeing Robinson as a romantic rival, believe it or not, for co-star Marlene Dietrich whom he fancied) verbally berating Robinson with profanities before the cast and crew on numerous occasions. The final result was this physical altercation between the two happening, the moment captured by a photographer.

What I find interesting here is the familiar white curly hair of Alan Hale in the background, his arms around Robinson, trying to break up the fight. And this is the way that I like to think of Hale, as a good guy in a pinch doing the right thing by trying to settle things down. By the gleeful expression on Ward Bond's face, on the other hand, he might not be the best person to rely upon when cooler heads are required.

e3de496a9865c6837180a420b23ff006%2B%25281%2529.jpg

Sounds like Hale was trying to be the peacemaker, and Bond the instigator.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...