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Alan Hale, Character Actor Support Par Excellence


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23 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Sounds like Hale was trying to be the peacemaker, and Bond the instigator.

 

No, I don't think Bond was the instigator but he sure seems to be enjoying the show. Yes, Alan Hale seemed to be trying to break the fight up before someone (probably Eddie G.) got hurt. Raft had a reputation for being difficult on some of his film sets and not long after this his contract with Warner Brothers was ended.

The following year Hale and Bond would both be performing in Gentleman Jim, both of them doing outstanding work in that production. Bond's John L. Sullivan may be the best work of his career, in fact.

All Hail Alan Hale « The Errol Flynn Blog

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1 minute ago, TomJH said:

No, I don't think Bond was the instigator but he sure seems to be enjoying the show. Yes, Alan Hale seemed to be trying to break the fight up before someone (probably Eddie G.) got hurt. Raft had a reputation for being difficult on some of his film sets and not long after this his contract with Warner Brothers was ended.

And yet according to legend Raft saved Cagney from being killed by real-life gangsters.

Would he have done the same for Robinson despite their off-screen feud? Probably not.

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the more interesting photographs you will see of a real life incident on a Hollywood sound stage is this confrontation that broke out between Edward G. Robinson and George Raft while making Manpower (1941). The two actors did not get along with Raft (apparently resentful of his third billing in the film and seeing Robinson as a romantic rival, believe it or not, for co-star Marlene Dietrich whom he fancied) verbally berating Robinson with profanities before the cast and crew on numerous occasions. The final result was this physical altercation between the two happening, the moment captured by a photographer.

What I find interesting here is the familiar white curly hair of Alan Hale in the background, his arms around Robinson, trying to break up the fight. And this is the way that I like to think of Hale, as a good guy in a pinch doing the right thing by trying to settle things down. By the gleeful expression on Ward Bond's face, on the other hand, he might not be the best person to rely upon when cooler heads are required.

e3de496a9865c6837180a420b23ff006%2B%25281%2529.jpg

And they're both wearing lifts.  :lol:

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1 minute ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

And yet according to legend Raft saved Cagney from being killed by real-life gangsters.

Would he have done the same for Robinson despite their off-screen feud? Probably not.

Robinson was very jealous of Raft who was 'close' to Dietrich,this was the only reason,Dietrich was not a hard to get woman but between Edgar and Raft the choice was easy for her.

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18 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

And yet according to legend Raft saved Cagney from being killed by real-life gangsters.

Would he have done the same for Robinson despite their off-screen feud? Probably not.

That's right. Raft probably did save Cagney's life after he spoke to some gangland associates when an "accident" may have been in the cards for Jimmy during some studio labour problems. Cagney spoke very well about Raft in his bio.

Speaking of Cagney he also wrote this, "The one consolation for all the hard work we did was the kind of person you worked with. Alan Hale, that wonderful guy we all loved. Always in a good humour."

Here they are playing chess on the set of Captains of the Clouds.

James Cagney and Alan Hale play chess between takes on the set of Captains  of the Clouds. August, 1941 | James cagney, Actor james, Black and white  movie

The Fighting 69th (1940)

The Fighting 69th 1940

James Cagney and Alan Hale Sr. in The Strawberry Blonde.....Uploaded By  www.1stand2ndtimearound.etsy.com | James cagney, Strawberry blonde,  Hollywood pictures

The Strawberry Blonde 1941

Captains of the Clouds (1942) ~ James Cagney, Alan Hale Sr. & Dennis Morgan  | James cagney, American actors, Hollywood

Captains of the Clouds 1942

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And now for your viewing pleasure, ladies and gentlemen, here are a singing and dancing Alan Hale and Jack Carson trying to out ham one another

 

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The first film I saw that feature Alan Hale was Of Human Bondage (1934) since this was a Leslie Howard\Bette Davis film.    I then discovered that this was somewhat of a unique role for him,  in that he plays-it-straight.    Since Davis and Bogart were the actors that got me into studio-era films,  I started to watch a lot of Warner Bros films  and Hale keep showing up in film after film.    For me he was one of those actors that had a fairly routine screen persona,  but was also versatile. 

So many fine performances in first rate films,  and then once Errol Flynn showed what he could do in Captain Blood,  12 films with Errol (and of course WB Cagney and Bogart in between those films).

Edit:  I had only 8 films with Errol but Tom knows his stuff and it is 12. 

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Hale gives a fine performance in What Now, Little Man? (1934), a Frank Borzage film about a young couple in Depression Germany (at the verge of the rise of the National Socialist Party).  He starts out as Margaret Sullivan's slightly lecherous stepmother's beau, but ultimately redeems himself with the young couple.  I wish TCM could get a print of this fine film (it works well with MGM's Three Comrades), but there's only a bad copy on Youtube. 

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The scrum between Eddie G. and George Raft could've been avoided if George had just taken the 'Sam Spade' role offered him in THE MALTESE FALCON.   How easily the fight could've been avoided!   WARD BOND was a scrappy guy; I'm not surprised he was smiling when the fight broke out. 

Trivia Nugget:  ALAN HALE, Sr., WARD BOND and HUMPHREY BOGART all died at age 57. 

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Alan Hale appeared in more films with Errol Flynn than any other actor during his career. The two actors, buddies in real life, had a delicious screen chemistry in which the fun they had in each other's company translated itself beautifully to the audience. Here are the 12 Flynn films in which Hale appeared.

The Prince and the Pauper (1937)

The Prince and the Pauper (1937)

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

Have you seen The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

The Sisters (1938), noteworthy as the only one of their films in which the two actors shared no scenes

The Sisters (1938)

Dodge City (1939)

100 Hale Sr., Alan ideas | alan, hale, errol flynn

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)

Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex

Virginia City (1940)

Rally 'Round The Flag: Errol Flynn in VIRGINIA CITY (Warner Brothers 1940)  – cracked rear viewer

The Sea Hawk (1940)

ERROL FLYNN — Errol Flynn and Alan Hale in The Sea Hawk (Michael...

Santa Fe Trail (1940)

File:Santa Fe Trail 2.jpg - Wikipedia

Footsteps in the Dark (1941)

Footsteps in the Dark (1941) - IMDb

Desperate Journey (1942)

Desperate Journey (1942) with Errol Flynn | Errol flynn, Errol, Ronald  reagan

Gentleman Jim (1942)

Gentleman Jim (1942)

Adventures of Don Juan (1948)

Adventures of Don Juan (1948) - 3/5 — The Boneyard

Of note, Hale and Flynn also had separate musical appearances in the all star Thank Your Lucky Stars 1943).

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Kinda, I reckon.  ROBERT TAYLOR died in 1969 at age 57 as well.  I recall reading his last words were "Art, I wish I'd have quit sooner".   

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→ In regards to ALAN HALE, Sr.  being in The Lost Patrol (1934) I would wager he had lines that were filmed but bit the dust in the editing room. 

HALE seemed to be enjoying himself as a counterfeiter in the 1932 movie Union Depot. 

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Here's a clip from The Strawberry Blonde, a sentimental turn-of-the-century valentine to New York City, as director Raoul Walsh wished it to have been (he was raised as a boy there). This film has one of my favourite performances of both Jimmy Cagney and Alan Hale.

It's wonderful watching these two acting pros together here.

 

 

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Here's a clip from The Strawberry Blonde, a sentimental turn-of-the-century valentine to New York City, as director Raoul Walsh wished it to have been (he was raised as a boy there). This film has one of my favourite performances of both Jimmy Cagney and Alan Hale.

It's wonderful watching these two acting pros together here.

 

 

I agree, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. worked well together. I loved their scenes as father and son in THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE.

And just to think the previous year before, in THE FIGHTING 69TH, Cagney's smart aleck Jerry Plunkett drove commanding officer Hale's Sgt. Wynn crazy with his antics.

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48 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I agree, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. worked well together. I loved their scenes as father and son in THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE.

 

I think you meant Alan Hale Sr.

However, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. did work together on one occasion, in West Point Story. Since it was filmed the same year in which Hale's father died I suspect the two actors may have had a sentimental conversation or two about him.

386078_full.jpg

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32 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I think you meant Alan Hale Sr.

However, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. did work together on one occasion, in West Point Story. Since it was filmed the same year in which Hale's father died I suspect the two actors may have had a sentimental conversation or two about him.

 

They discussed Hale Sr,  and one thing Cagney said was that Hale didn't mug-to-the-camera and try to steal the scene like this guy:

Posterazzi S.Z. Sakall Portrait (16 x 20)

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44 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I think you meant Alan Hale Sr.

However, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. did work together on one occasion, in West Point Story. Since it was filmed the same year in which Hale's father died I suspect the two actors may have had a sentimental conversation or two about him.

386078_full.jpg

Any idea if this might've been when Alan Jr. first used his signature phrase "Little Buddy" in anything???

(...naaah, probably not, huh...Cagney there probably wouldn't have liked that, huh...nope, Junior there probably would've gotten the very same reaction that you're seein' on Jimmy's face here, huh!)

LOL

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AND speakin' of Junior here...

Sometime back in the early-'70s, I once dined at his old Lobster Barrel restaurant located along what was and maybe still is called La Cienega's Restaurant Row...

0a1b1e3ad89c9e81018b1fcaed65d2a8.jpg

(...took a date there...wasn't too bad...the restaurant, not the date, that is)

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On 12/17/2017 at 9:14 AM, TomJH said:

One of the great pleasures of viewing films from the studio system days is the joy in spotting certain character actors in support. We all have our favourites and long one of the faces that I most enjoyed seeing was laughing, jovial Alan Hale

JOSEPH CALLEIA... ALAN MOWBRAY... MELVILLE COOPER... and ALAN HALE!!!   HALE appeared in a few of ERROL FLYNN's of course... what a splendid pair! 

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39 minutes ago, Dargo said:

386078_full.jpg

Any idea if this might've been when Alan Jr. first used his signature phrase "Little Buddy" in anything???

(...naaah, probably not, huh...Cagney there probably wouldn't have liked that, huh...nope, Junior there probably would've gotten the very same reaction that you're seein' on Jimmy's face here, huh!)

LOL

Cagney doesn't look like he's in a mood to be called little anything, especially from a guy calling himself "Princess."

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I watched The Time, The Place and the Girl (1946), one of those trifle Warner Bros. Technicolor musicals in which a likable cast (Dennis Morgan, Jack Carson, Janis Paige, Martha Vickers) is saddled with mediocre material. If you never see the film you won't have missed much.

Alan Hale and S. Z. Sakall, who didn't like working with one another, are both in the supporting cast. Sakall has a far larger role, while Hale, I'm sorry to say, is largely thrown away in a small part (one of the curses of his later years at the studio). Hale complained about Sakall mangling the English language so much that it threw him off his cues. I believe there is one scene in which Sakall is speaking while Hale stands in the background not saying anything. They probably both preferred it that way.

I'm ready to be corrected on this but I think this might have been the only scene shared by these two character actors who couldn't stand one another.

The Time, the Place and the Girl (1946) - IMDb

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

I think you meant Alan Hale Sr.

However, Cagney and Alan Hale Jr. did work together on one occasion, in West Point Story. Since it was filmed the same year in which Hale's father died I suspect the two actors may have had a sentimental conversation or two about him.

386078_full.jpg

Darn, I did it again, using the wrong word. I need to recheck my posts before I send them out.

Yes, I recall Cagney and Hale Junior appearing in WEST POINT STORY. Didn't know that Hale Senior died that year. No doubt everyone that worked with him felt his loss.

In addition to his son and Cagney, I imagine Errol Flynn probably mourned him as well. They were frequent co-stars in quite a few films.

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22 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

In addition to his son and Cagney, I imagine Errol Flynn probably mourned him as well. They were frequent co-stars in quite a few films.

According to Steve Hayes, author of Googies Coffeeshop to the Stars, who briefly lived in Flynn's home, Errol went into a depression when Alan Hale died.

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Much as it is apparent by this thread that many TCM viewers like Alan Hale, I am struck by how relatively little is known about the actor's personal life. There has been no biography on him, that I know of, and while some articles may have been written about him in some magazines at some time where are they and how do you access them now? Search the internet about Hale and you just keep finding the same basic facts, his birth date, he wanted to be an opera singer, he was an amateur inventor, his film career started in the silents, a list of his films, his wife's name and photo, father of three children, including a famous son, friend of Errol Flynn, his death date and cause of death.

Just cold facts. But where are the anecdotes about this man's life? His likes and dislikes? Who were his friends besides Flynn and where are the stories about experiences that he shared with a devil-may-care character like him? I'm sure there must be some good ones. But where are they? You don't find them in Flynn's autobiography, outside of one anecdote.

What we have, fortunately, still preserved are the best films of Hale's career at Warner Brothers, where his ebullient, highly engaging performances are available to see. And that's great. But that's still only what we see on screen. Where are the stories about the Alan Hale who existed behind the screen?

Alan Hale - Turner Classic Movies

If anyone knows of any anecdotes about this actor it would be appreciated if they would share them with us.

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