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How well do you know classic MGM films of the 40s & 50s?


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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

My 1948 seen list:

  • The Search
  • State of the Union
  • The Three Musketeers
  • 3 Godfathers
  • Command Decision
  • Force of Evil

I have quite a few of the others in my to-watch pile.

Never seen Easter Parade?  The only one I haven't seen on the list is No Minor Vices..cast looks interesting, but plot summary sounds so-so...

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18 minutes ago, shutoo said:

Never seen Easter Parade?  The only one I haven't seen on the list is No Minor Vices..cast looks interesting, but plot summary sounds so-so...

That's one of the ones that I have in my to-watch pile. I'm not much of a musical fan, nor a fan of Garland, but I'm watching more of both to try and change my mind.

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I've seen 70* movies from 1948, but only 6 from MGM. Out of curiosity, I looked to see what studios released the others:

Allied Artists

  1. The Babe Ruth Story

British Lion

  1. The Fallen Idol

Columbia Pictures

  1. The Man from Colorado
  2. Superman

Crusade Productions

  1. Because of Eve

Eagle-Lion

  1. The Amazing Mr. X
  2. He Walked By Night
  3. Oliver Twist
  4. Parole, Inc.
  5. The Red Shoes
  6. The Scar

Film Classics

  1. Inner Sanctum

Fox

  1. Apartment for Peggy
  2. Call Northside 777
  3. Cry of the City
  4. The Iron Curtain
  5. The Luck of the Irish
  6. Road House
  7. Sitting Pretty
  8. The Snake Pit
  9. The Street with No Name
  10. That Wonderful Urge
  11. When My Baby Smiles at Me
  12. Yellow Sky

Lopert Films

  1. Louisiana Story

Paramount Pictures

  1. The Paleface
  2. Sorry, Wrong Number

Pathe

  1. Counterblast

Rank

  1. Hamlet

Renown Pictures

  1. Things Happen at Night

Republic

  1. Macbeth
  2. Under California Stars

RKO

  1. Blood on the Moon
  2. The Boy with Green Hair
  3. Fort Apache
  4. Good Sam
  5. I Remember Mama
  6. Joan of Arc
  7. Rachel and the Stranger
  8. They Live By Night

Screen Classics

  1. Test Tube Babies

Selznick Releasing Corporation

  1. Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House
  2. Portrait of Jennie

United Artists

  1. Here Comes Trouble
  2. My Dear Secretary
  3. Red River
  4. The Time of Your Life
  5. Who Killed Doc Robin?

Universal

  1. Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein
  2. All My Sons
  3. Letter from an Unknown Woman
  4. The Naked City

Viro Pictures

  1. Street Corner

Warner Brothers

  1. Johnny Belinda
  2. Key Largo
  3. Rope
  4. Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  5. The Woman in White

And these foreign films:

  1. Bicycle Thieves
  2. Drunken Angel
  3. Forbidden Women
  4. Spring in a Small Town

*Total includes a couple of short films that I didn't bother listing.

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 Screen-Shot-2019-01-01-at-6.53.21-AM.jpe

1949

The studio released 30 feature films. Ten of them were in Technicolor; and another one had a short Technicolor sequence.

The greatest number of releases occurred in November (5). No new feature films were released in January.

Popular series-- Lassie

Jeanette MacDonald made her last movie. Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire reunited. Errol Flynn teamed up with Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon. And Wallace Beery’s last film was released three days before his death.

These MGM contract players were in four or more films in 1949: Janet Leigh (4).

JANUARY

There were no new features released.

FEBRUARY

THE BRIBE with Robert Taylor, Charles Laughton, Ava Gardner, John Hodiak and Vincent Price. Taylor and Laughton previously costarred in STAND BY FOR ACTION. First of three MGM films in which Taylor and Gardner appeared together.

CAUGHT with James Mason, Robert Ryan and Barbara Bel Geddes. An independent production directed by Max Ophuls that was released by MGM.

MARCH

LITTLE WOMEN with June Allyson, Peter Lawford, Mary Astor, Elizabeth Taylor, Margaret O’Brien, Connie Gilchrist, Leon Ames, Rossano Brazzi, Janet Leigh and C. Aubrey Smith. Technicolor remake of story previously filmed by RKO in 1933. Brazzi’s Hollywood movie debut. Astor had played mother to several of her younger costars in other MGM films and was feeling typecast. Though film is now associated with Christmas, it was released at Easter. This was C. Aubrey Smith’s final film. He died in late 1948, after completing his role.

APRIL

BIG JACK with Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main, Richard Conte, Edward Arnold and Clem Bevans. Beery’s last film, released a few days before his death. His seventh pairing with Main. Conte was borrowed from Fox.

TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME with Esther Williams, Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett and Edward Arnold. Story was devised by Kelly with help from Stanley Donen. Williams’ part was intended for Ginger Rogers. Williams and Kelly did not get along behind the scenes and never worked together again.

THE SECRET GARDEN with Margaret O’Brien, Dean Stockwell, Elsa Lanchester, Herbert Marshall and Reginald Owen. Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel, previously filmed in 1919. O’Brien’s last film under contract to the studio. Black-and-white cinematography, with a Technicolor scene at the end.

MAY

THE BARKLEYS OF BROADWAY with Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire, Billie Burke, Oscar Levant and Jacques Francois. The last Rogers & Astaire musical, and their only one in Technicolor, made ten years after their previous effort at RKO.  This was prolific French actor Jacques Francois’ only Hollywood film.

THE SUN COMES UP with Pal, Jeanette MacDonald, Claude Jarman, Lloyd Nolan, Lewis Stone and Margaret Hamilton. MacDonald’s final film.

THE STRATTON STORY with James Stewart, June Allyson, Frank Morgan, Agnes Moorehead and Bill Williams. Very popular with audiences. Stewart’s first film at MGM since 1941’s ZIEGFELD GIRL. He and Allyson paired up two more times at other studios.

JUNE

EDWARD, MY SON with Spencer Tracy, Deborah Kerr and Ian Hunter. Made in England, based on a play by actor Robert Morley. The first of Kerr’s six Oscar nominations as Best Actress.

NEPTUNE’S DAUGHTER with Esther Williams, Red Skelton, Ricardo Montalban and Betty Garrett.

THE GREAT SINNER with Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner, Frank Morgan, Ethel Barrymore, Agnes Moorehead, Walter Huston and Melvyn Douglas. Peck’s role was meant for Kirk Douglas, and Gardner’s role had been intended for Lana Turner.

JULY

ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY with Clark Gable, Alexis Smith, Lewis Stone, Barry Sullivan, Leon Ames, Darryl Hickman, Frank Morgan, Mary Astor, Audrey Totter and Wendell Corey. Another big hit for Gable. Smith was borrowed from Warners. This was Astor’s last film for a while; she would return in MGM’s THE POWER AND THE PRIZE in 1956.

SCENE OF THE CRIME with Van Johnson, Gloria DeHaven, Tom Drake and Leon Ames. A rare noir assignment for Johnson. Drake’s last film at the studio.

IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME with Judy Garland, Van Johnson. S.Z. Sakall, Spring Byington, Technicolor musical remake of 1940’s THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER.

AUGUST

MADAME BOVARY with Jennifer Jones, Van Heflin, Louis Jourdan and Ellen Corby. Based on Gustave Flaubert’s 1956 novel, which had already been filmed in France, Germany and Argentina. Jones and Jourdan were borrowed from David Selznick. Jones’ role had been intended for Lana Turner.

SEPTEMBER

THAT MIDNIGHT KISS with Kathryn Grayson, Mario Lanza, Jose Iturbi, Ethel Barrymore and Keenan Wynn. A big hit, this was Lanza’s first MGM film and Iturbi’s last for the studio.

THE DOCTOR AND THE GIRL with Glenn Ford, Janet Leigh, Charles Coburn, Gloria DeHaven and Nancy Davis. Ford’s first MGM film, and also Davis’ first for the studio.

OCTOBER

THE RED DANUBE with Walter Pidgeon, Janet Leigh, Peter Lawford, Angela Lansbury, Ethel Barrymore and Louis Calhern. Expensive cold war propaganda film failed at the box office. Pidgeon’s role was meant for Spencer Tracy, and Barrymore’s role was intended for Irene Dunne.

BORDER INCIDENT with George Murphy, Ricardo Montalban and Howard Da Silva. Director Anthony Mann’s first film at Metro.

CHALLENGE TO LASSIE with Pal, Donald Crisp, Edmund Gwenn. The fifth Lassie film at MGM, and the fourth and final one to feature Crisp. The story was based on Eleanor Atkinson’s novel ‘Greyfriars Bobby’ which was reused for a 1961 Disney movie, in which Crisp also starred.

NOVEMBER

THAT FORSYTE WOMAN with Greer Garson, Errol Flynn, Walter Pidgeon, Robert Young and Janet Leigh. Based on John Galsworthy’s novel. Flynn was borrowed from Warner and it was his first MGM film. This was Young’s last MGM film; his previous assignment at the studio had been 1944’s THE CANTERVILLE GHOST. He was now freelancing and would go into television. He made a total of 46 features at MGM between 1931 and 1949.

BATTLEGROUND with George Murphy, Van Johnson, John Hodiak, Ricardo Montalban, James Whitmore and Marshall Thompson. Best picture nominee had started pre-production at RKO, but the property came over to MGM when Dore Schary switched studios. Johnson’s role was initially assigned to Robert Taylor who dropped out. This was Whitmore’s first MGM film.

ADAM’S RIB with Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, David Wayne, Polly Moran, Judy Holliday, Tom Ewell and Jean Hagen. Moran hadn’t made a film at the studio since 1934’s HOLLYWOOD PARTY. This was Hagen’s movie debut. Director George Cukor would team up with Tracy & Hepburn again on PAT & MIKE; and he also directed Judy Holliday a few more times.

INTRUDER IN THE DUST with Claude Jarman, David Brian and Juano Hernandez.

TENSION with Richard Basehart, Audrey Totter, Barry Sullivan, Cyd Charisse and William Conrad. A non-musical role for Charisse. Basehart’s character assumes the alias Paul Sothern, after seeing a photo of MGM contract player Ann Sothern.

DECEMBER

CONSPIRATOR with Robert Taylor, Elizabeth Taylor, Robert Flemyng and Honor Blackman. Thriller made in England. Released in the U.K. in December but did not get American release by the studio until the following March. In the story, the lead characters fall in love and get married. Though Elizabeth Taylor was playing an 18 year old, she was 16 at the time of filming; and Robert Taylor was 38. Their obvious age gap was pointed out by critics, and the film failed at the box office.

EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE with James Mason, Barbara Stanwyck, Van Heflin, Ava Gardner and Nancy Davis. The third and final pairing of Stanwyck and Hefln. Mason and Gardner worked together again on PANDORA AND THE FLYING DUTCHMAN a year later. This was Heflin’s last film under contract to MGM; he moved over to Paramount.

MALAYA with James Stewart, Spencer Tracy, Sydney Greenstreet, John Hodiak and Lionel Barrymore. Another project Dore Schary brought over from RKO. Its success at the box office, along with BATTLEGROUND, meant Schary was now in line to succeed Mayer as the studio’s top boss. Greenstreet was borrowed from Warners, and it would turn out to be his last screen role.

ON THE TOWN with Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Betty Garrett, Ann Miller and Vera-Ellen. The first film on which Kelly had a directing credit.

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Saw a lot more from this year. From 1949: Little Women, The Secret Garden, The Barkleys of Broadway, The Stratton Story, Neptune's Daughter, In the Good Old Summertime, Madame Bovary, That Midnight Kiss, The Red Danube, That Forsyte Woman, Adam's Rib, East Side West Side, Malaya, and on the Town

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16 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Saw a lot more from this year. From 1949: Little Women, The Secret Garden, The Barkleys of Broadway, The Stratton Story, Neptune's Daughter, In the Good Old Summertime, Madame Bovary, That Midnight Kiss, The Red Danube, That Forsyte Woman, Adam's Rib, East Side West Side, Malaya, and on the Town

I should mention that 1949 was Metro's 25th anniversary year (the studio's first films hit screens in 1924).

LITTLE WOMEN was intended for a 1948 release but was delayed so it could be part of the silver anniversary celebrations.

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2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I should mention that 1949 was Metro's 25th anniversary year (the studio's first films hit screens in 1924).

LITTLE WOMEN was intended for a 1948 release but was delayed so it could be part of the silver anniversary celebrations.

Indeed it was. :) You can still see certain films from that year with the title card saying "An metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Silver Anniversary Picture". And you also got this grand and glorious picture: A-MGM-1949-Silver-Jubilee.jpg

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

Indeed it was. :) You can still see certain films from that year with the title card saying "An metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Silver Anniversary Picture". And you also got this grand and glorious picture: A-MGM-1949-Silver-Jubilee.jpg

Here they are:

Top row: Alexis Smith; Ann Sothern; J. Carrol Naish; Dean Stockwell; Lewis Stone; Clinton Sundberg; Robert Taylor; Audrey Totter; Spencer Tracy; Esther Williams; Keenan Wynn

Second row: Peter Lawford; Jeanette MacDonald; Ann Miller; Ricardo Montalban; Jules Munshin; George Murphy; Reginald Owen; Walter Pidgeon; Jane Powell; Ginger Rogers; Frank Sinatra; Red Skelton

Third row: Katharine Hepburn; John Hodiak; Claude Jarman; Van Johnson; Jennifer Jones; Louis Jourdan; Howard Keel; Gene Kelly; Christopher Kent; Angela Lansbury; Mario Lanza; Janet Leigh

Fourth row: Gloria DeHaven; Tom Drake; Jimmy Durante; Vera-Ellen; Errol Flynn; Clark Gable; Ava Gardner; Judy Garland; Betty Garrett; Edmund Gwenn; Kathryn Grayson; Van Heflin

Bottom row: Lionel Barrymore; June Allyson; Leon Ames; Fred Astaire; Edward Arnold; Pal (Lassie); Mary Astor; Ethel Barrymore; Spring Byington; James Craig; Arlene Dahl

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I found the credits on another site:

Top Row: Alexis Smith, Ann Sothern, J. Carrol Naish, Stockwell, Stone, Clinton Sundberg, Taylor, Audrey Totter, Tracy, Esther Williams, Wynn.

Second Row: Lawford, Jeanette MacDonald, Miller, Montalban, Jules Munshin, Murphy, Reginald Owen, Pidgeon, Powell, Rogers, Sinatra, Skelton.

Third Row: Hepburn, Hodiak, Jarman, Johnson, Jones, Jourdan, Keel, Kelly, Christopher Kent, Lansbury, Lanza, Leigh.

Fourth Row: DeHaven, Tom Drake, Durante, Vera-Ellen, Flynn, Gable, Gardner, Garland, Garrett, Gwenn, Kathryn Grayson, Heflin.

Bottom Row: Barrymore, Allyson, Leon Ames, Astaire, Arnold, Lassie, Astor, Barrymore, Byington, Craig, Dahl.

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Thanks Larry. I found them too and corrected my errors. 

We should add that Van Heflin and Jennifer Jones are in costume from MADAME BOVARY (filmed from mid December '48 to mid March '49).

Kathryn Grayson seems to be wearing make-up for the character she played in THAT MIDNIGHT KISS (filmed from mid January '49 to mid March '49).

Peter Lawford is in costume from THE RED DANUBE (filmed from late February '49 to late April '49).

Though she was a Warners contract player, Alexis Smith is in the photo because she was at MGM to do ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY (filmed from early January '49 to late February '49)

Meaning this photo must've been taken in late February 1949.

Greer Garson is noticeably absent from the photo. She would've been working on THAT FORSYTE WOMAN which was in production during this time (explaining why Errol Flynn is included, since like Smith he was a Warners contract player on loan out).

Lana Turner is also absent. She had been suspended for refusing to make MADAME BOVARY. Her next MGM picture wouldn't occur until the following year.

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Screen-Shot-2019-01-01-at-6.53.21-AM.jpe

Here's how MGM rates in terms of output compared to other studios in the 1940s:

COLUMBIA: 544 films

RKO: 363 films

DISNEY: 12 films

MGM: 347 films

PARAMOUNT: 306 films

MONOGRAM: 413 films

ALLIED ARTISTS: 15 films

UNIVERSAL/INTERNATIONAL: 457 films

REPUBLIC: 471 films

WARNER BROTHERS: 275 films

20TH CENTURY FOX: 368 films

UNITED ARTISTS: 228 films

FILM CLASSICS: 27 films

SCREEN GUILD/LIPPERT: 55 films

PRODUCERS RELEASING CORPORATION: 259 films

EAGLE-LION: 103 films

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  • 2 years later...
On 12/26/2017 at 8:55 PM, TopBilled said:

Lana Turner is also absent. She had been suspended for refusing to make MADAME BOVARY. Her next MGM picture wouldn't occur until the following year.

Just read this comment and had to look it up.     While Madame Bovary did lose money it still might have helped Turner's career. 

I looked up the film Turner did make after her suspension was lifted:   A Life of Her Own.      Bovary had a budget of just over 2 million,  while A Life of Her Own had one of just over 1.8 million.      I just wonder why it would cost that much to make a film like A Life of Her Own;    The screenplay was original so it couldn't have cost that much and since the film is all set in the current time period.    I don't see where MGM would have had to pay to cast an high priced independent actor. 

I can see why a period film like Bovary might run over 2 million.   There is also paying for the rights to use the novel to the estate of Flaubert.  

Note that Turner didn't wish to make A Life of Her Own,  but according to Wiki:

 Lana Turner initially refused to star in the film, but MGM executives Louis B. Mayer and Dore Schary demanded she honor her contract with the studio.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Just read this comment and had to look it up.     While Madame Bovary did lose money it still might have helped Turner's career. 

I looked up the film Turner did make after her suspension was lifted:   A Life of Her Own.      Bovary had a budget of just over 2 million,  while A Life of Her Own had one of just over 1.8 million.      I just wonder why it would cost that much to make a film like A Life of Her Own;    The screenplay was original so it couldn't have cost that much and since the film is all set in the current time period.    I don't see where MGM would have had to pay to cast an high priced independent actor. 

I can see why a period film like Bovary might run over 2 million.   There is also paying for the rights to use the novel to the estate of Flaubert.  

Note that Turner didn't wish to make A Life of Her Own,  but according to Wiki:

 Lana Turner initially refused to star in the film, but MGM executives Louis B. Mayer and Dore Schary demanded she honor her contract with the studio.

Interesting comments. I just read what's on the wiki page for A LIFE OF HER OWN. My guess is these factors contributed to the hefty price tag:

  • Lana Turner's salary
  • George Cukor's salary
  • multiple script rewrites
  • borrowing Ray Milland from Paramount
  • having to pay for Wendell Corey who was also borrowed from Paramount, but let go in the middle of production
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4 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting comments. I just read what's on the wiki page for A LIFE OF HER OWN. My guess is these factors contributed to the hefty price tag:

  • Lana Turner's salary
  • George Cukor's salary
  • multiple script rewrites
  • borrowing Ray Milland from Paramount
  • having to pay for Wendell Corey who was also borrowed from Paramount, but let go in the middle of production

Good point about Ray Milland;  Maybe I did sell him short by implying that it wouldn't be too expense to obtain the lead male star.

I like the film (especially the start when Ann Dvorak is on screen),   but I really can't see Wendell Corey in the role.   Milland was a better fit.    

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11 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Good point about Ray Milland;  Maybe I did sell him short by implying that it wouldn't be too expense to obtain the lead male star.

I like the film (especially the start when Ann Dvorak is on screen),   but I really can't see Wendell Corey in the role.   Milland was a better fit.    

Milland was an Oscar winner with many hit films to his credit. I am sure he did not come cheap!

***

The wiki article says that Corey complained about Turner's lateness to the set. She was notorious for being late.

It's the main reason Jane Wyman wanted her fired from Falcon Crest 30 years later. Wyman refused to wait for her to get ready for scenes, feeling it was very unprofessional. So after the first batch of episodes in season one, Turner was written out. When they had to bring Turner back in season two to wrap up a long-running storyline (and kill off Turner's character), Wyman insisted that any shared scenes between them be filmed separately.

Wyman shot all her dialogue speaking to a stand-in off camera. And after she was done, Turner was brought in to shoot her dialogue, speaking to Wyman's stand-in. Then the editors spliced it together in post-production.

Screen Shot 2021-08-31 at 6.11.47 PM

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2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

It's the main reason Jane Wyman wanted her fired from Falcon Crest 30 years later. Wyman refused to wait for her to get ready for scenes, feeling it was very unprofessional. So after the first batch of episodes in season one, Turner was written out. When they had to bring Turner back in season two to wrap up a long-running storyline (and kill off Turner's character), Wyman insisted that any shared scenes between them be filmed separately.

Wyman shot all her dialogue speaking to a stand-in off camera. And after she was done, Turner was brought in to shoot her dialogue, speaking to Wyman's stand-in. Then the editors spliced it together in post-production.

That might have been the ideal solution to settle the hostility between Bette Davis and Joan Crawford in WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?.;)

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

This is one of my very favorite threads.

If there's interest, I will go over the MGM films of the 1950s.

That would be incredible.  I'd love to see the 1930s too, but maybe a little too much work.  Of all the MGM films of the 40s, the only ones I don't have in some version are Florian, Down in San Diego, The Omaha Trail, and Hitler's Hangmen.

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4 minutes ago, Web50 said:

That would be incredible.  I'd love to see the 1930s too, but maybe a little too much work.  Of all the MGM films of the 40s, the only ones I don't have in some version are Florian, Down in San Diego, The Omaha Trail, and Hitler's Hangmen.

According to MovieCollector's database, DOWN IN SAN DIEGO last aired in 1997 on TCM (meaning it probably ran into legal issues). FLORIAN has never aired (must be a rights issue).  THE OMAHA TRAIL aired in 2006 and again in 2016 (so it's probably one the programmers just overlook, or it doesn't fit any of their themes). And HITLER'S MADMAN last aired in 2017.

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19 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

According to MovieCollector's database, DOWN IN SAN DIEGO last aired in 1997 on TCM (meaning it probably ran into legal issues). FLORIAN has never aired (must be a rights issue).  THE OMAHA TRAIL aired in 2006 and again in 2016 (so it's probably one the programmers just overlook, or it doesn't fit any of their themes). And HITLER'S MADMAN last aired in 2017.

IMDb's trivia section says TCM aired Florian in June 1994, and TNT aired it in December 1988, but there are legal issues that have prevented its showing on TV or distribution via home media.

The book's author (Felix Salten) also wrote Bambi and the book that The Shaggy Dog was based on.

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12 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

IMDb's trivia section says TCM aired Florian in June 1994, and TNT aired it in December 1988, but there are legal issues that have prevented its showing on TV or distribution via home media.

Interesting. So maybe Movie Collector does not have the schedule information for the few months TCM was on air?

Well at least we know it did air at least once on TCM.

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1950

Screen-Shot-2019-01-01-at-6.53.21-AM.jpe

During this year the studio released 39 feature films.

May had the most releases (7).

This was the first year since 1929 that Wallace Beery did not appear in a film for MGM, as he passed away in April 1949. It was also the year that Frank Morgan’s last feature film for the studio was released— KEY TO THE CITY.

These MGM contract players were in four or more films in 1950: Louis Calhern (7); Leon Ames (7); James Whitmore (5); Arlene Dahl (4); Jean Hagen (4); Marshall Thompson (4); Spring Byington (4).

JANUARY

AMBUSH with Robert Taylor, John Hodiak and Arlene Dahl

FEBRUARY

KEY TO THE CITY with Loretta Young, Clark Gable, Frank Morgan and Marilyn Maxwell. Young & Gable had previously costarred in CALL OF THE WILD (1935) for 20th Century Pictures.

MARCH

THE OUTRIDERS with Joel McCrea, Arlene Dahl, Barry Sullivan and Claude Jarman

NANCY GOES TO RIO with Ann Sothern, Jane Powell, Barry Sullivan and Louis Calhern

BLACK HAND with Gene Kelly, Teresa Celli and J. Carrol Naish

CONSPIRATOR with Robert Taylor, Elizabeth Taylor and Robert Flemyng. Elizabeth Taylor’s first adult role. Film was released in Britain in December 1949 but did not have its U.S. premiere until March 1950.

APRIL

THE YELLOW CAB MAN with Red Skelton, Gloria DeHaven, Edward Arnold and Walter Slezak

MAY

THE REFORMER AND THE REDHEAD with June Allyson, Dick Powell and David Wayne. Allyson & Powell met when she had a minor role in MGM's MEET THE PEOPLE (1944).

STARS IN MY CROWN with Joel McCrea, Ellen Drew and Dean Stockwell

PLEASE BELIEVE ME with Deborah Kerr, Mark Stevens, Robert Walker and Peter Lawford

THE ASPHALT JUNGLE with Sterling Hayden, Jean Hagen, Louis Calhern and James Whitmore

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN with Betty Hutton, Howard Keel, Louis Calhern, Edward Arnold and Keenan Wynn. Hutton was borrowed from Paramount to replace Judy Garland, who was dropped by the studio.

SHADOW ON THE WALL with Ann Sothern, Zachary Scott and Nancy Davis. Sothern’s last film for the studio though she would remain on contract for three more years-- starring in "The Adventures of Maisie" on radio until 1953.

SIDE STREET with Farley Granger, Cathy O’Donnell, James Craig and Jean Hagen

THE BIG HANGOVER with Elizabeth Taylor, Van Johnson and Leon Ames

JUNE

FATHER OF THE BRIDE with Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett, Elizabeth Taylor and Don Taylor. Tracy and Bennett had previously costarred in ME AND MY GAL (1932). Nominated for best picture.

THE SKIPPER SURPRISED HIS WIFE with Robert Walker, Joan Leslie, Edward Arnold and Spring Byington. Arnold's last film at MGM.

THE NEXT VOICE YOU HEAR with James Whitmore, Nancy Davis and Gary Gray

JULY

CRISIS with Cary Grant, Jose Ferrer, Paula Raymond and Signe Hasso. First feature film directed by Richard Brooks.

THE HAPPY YEARS with Dean Stockwell, Darryl Hickman and Scotty Beckett

THREE LITTLE WORDS with Fred Astaire, Red Skelton, Vera-Ellen, Arlene Dahl and Gloria DeHaven

DUCHESS OF IDAHO with Van Johnson, Esther Williams, John Lund and Paula Raymond.  Final feature film for Eleanor Powell, who appears in a specialty number.

MYSTERY STREET with Ricardo Montalban, Sally Forrest, Bruce Bennett and Elsa Lanchester

AUGUST

A LADY WITHOUT PASSPORT with Hedy Lamar, John Hodiak and James Craig. Lamarr’s last film with the studio.

THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS with Kathryn Grayson, Mario Lanza, David Niven and J. Carrol Naish

SUMMER STOCK with Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Eddie Bracken and Gloria DeHaven. Garland’s last film for the studio. Also DeHaven’s last film for the studio.

SEPTEMBER

A LIFE OF HER OWN with Lana Turner, Ray Milland, Tom Ewell, Louis Calhern, Barry Sullivan and Jean Hagen. Milland was borrowed from Paramount.

DEVIL’S DOORWAY with Robert Taylor, Louis Calhern, Paula Raymond and Spring Byington

OCTOBER

RIGHT CROSS with June Allyson, Dick Powell, Ricardo Montalban and Lionel Barrymore

TO PLEASE A LADY with Barbara Stanwyck, Clark Gable and Adolphe Menjou. Stanwyck & Gable had previously costarred in Warner Brothers' NIGHT NURSE (1931).

THE MINIVER STORY with Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, John Hodiak and Leo Genn. Sequel to Oscar winning MRS. MINIVER which was released eight years earlier. The studio's biggest flop in 1950.

NOVEMBER

DIAL 1119 with Marshall Thompson, Andrea King and Keefe Brasselle. First feature film directed by Gerald Mayer, nephew of studio boss Louis B. Mayer. Gerald Mayer became a prolific director on television, whose last credit was in 1985.

TWO WEEKS WITH LOVE with Jane Powell, Ricardo Montalban, Louis Calhern, Ann Harding and Debbie Reynolds

KING SOLOMON’S MINES with Stewart Granger, Deborah Kerr and Richard Carlson. Granger’s first film in Hollywood. Nominated for best picture. The studio's biggest moneymaker in 1950.

DECEMBER

KIM with Errol Flynn, Dean Stockwell and Paul Lukas. Flynn was borrowed from Warner Brothers.

MRS. O’MALLEY AND MR. MALONE with Marjorie Main, James Whitmore and Ann Dvorak. In early drafts Mrs. O'Malley was originally Hildegarde Withers but the studio could not get rights to use that character.

WATCH THE BIRDIE with Red Skelton, Arlene Dahl, Ann Miller and Leon Ames

THE MAGNIFICENT YANKEE with Louis Calhern, Ann Harding and Philip Ober. A rare leading role for Calhern, who was nominated for an Oscar. The film did well with critics but not at the box office.

PAGAN LOVE SONG with Esther Williams, Howard Keel and Rita Moreno

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