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The Sound of Music


joefilmone

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It was corny and old-fashioned, when it opened on Broadway in 1959. It will never be dated, and it will never be anything but the world's most beloved musical film. What do critics really know about film, anyway? Their job is to tear films apart, not enjoy films for what they are. Anyone who doesn't see The Sound of Music as a finely-crafted, perfectly cast film, doesn't have a clue what they're talking about. If the musical isn't your cup of tea, that's one thing, but saying the film is anything but perfectly made, is idiotic. It is what it is. No other musical film based on a Broadway show, improves upon its source material like The Sound of Music does.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I love the "Sound of Music" but I always thought this was funny!

 

Christopher Plummer intensely disliked working on the film. He's been known to refer to it as "The Sound of Mucus" and likened working with Julie Andrews to "being hit over the head with a big Valentine's Day card, every day."

 

So everytime I watch "The Sound of Music" I always laugh at what Christopher Plummer stated!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Enough already!

Yes, it was one of the biggest hits of all time.

Yes, Julie Andrews was a top box office star!

Yes, TSOM is loved!

Yes, JA and TSOM are loved!

Yes, the whole world loves The Sound of Music.

In your mind, that's all that the citizens of Iraq and Afghanistan are thinking of as I write this.

 

Most of the posters on this board are getting sick of your tirades, when you consistently state that anyone who doesn't like The Sound of Music or Julie Andrews, you consider to be an idiot. Give it up. Both JA and TSOM are not that important in the scheme of things if your choice is to constantly be so insulting to others with their own opinions.

 

"It was corny and old-fashioned, when it opened on Broadway in 1959."

 

Who cares? I enjoyed it when I first saw the 1959 stage show

 

"It will never be dated, and it will never be anything but the world's most beloved musical film."

 

That's a matter of opinion. Aside from the scenery, I can no longer sit through it. Overkill! I think most of the under 30 set would agree. It might be a good film for the mentally challenged to view but kids today just don't care. Julie Andrews is best known now for the Princess Diaries. With all the alternative media stimulation out there, The Sound of Music is no longer important to most people, and becomes less so with the passing of time. In 1965, it was a different story, but this is 2008.

 

"What do critics really know about film, anyway? Their job is to tear films apart, not enjoy films for what they are. Anyone who doesn't see The Sound of Music as a finely-crafted, perfectly cast film, doesn't have a clue what they're talking about."

 

Look who's being critical, judgmental, and opinionated. Oh, and I forgot clueless.

 

"but saying the film is anything but perfectly made, is idiotic."

 

I'm a PHD; I've been attending the theater and viewing films for over 50 years; I studied piano and cello at Julliard and my sons are attending Harvard. I'm hardly an idiot, intellectually or culturally. I don't think a person calling a film less than perfect is an idiot, but your anger at anyone who doesn't agree with you about something or someone as trivial as JA or TSOM is what I consider pretty idiotic.

 

"No other musical film based on a Broadway show, improves upon its source material like The Sound of Music does."

 

I saw the show with my wife. Mary Martin lit up the stage with a brilliant performance. Rodgers and Hammerstein's robust and delightful score may have seemed corny to many a critic, but for me, the performances made up for it. I remember enjoying the stage version much more. Mary Martin, Theodore Bikel, Marion Marlowe, and Patricia Neway were all wonderful as I remember. The film also cuts the Baroness songs, which took out some of the sophistication from the film.

 

"No other musical film based on a Broadway show, improves upon its source material like The Sound of Music does."

 

Again! That's your opinion! The show was a hit!, The film was a hit! Please allow people to disagree with your obsessive adoration of TSOM. So many of us are sick of listening to you.

 

Enjoy the evening!

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"Christopher Plummer intensely disliked working on the film. He's been known to refer to it as "The Sound of Mucus" and likened working with Julie Andrews to "being hit over the head with a big Valentine's Day card, every day." So everytime I watch "The Sound of Music" I always laugh at what Christopher Plummer stated!"

 

I've heard this too and it is pretty funny, but you might upset John as you are quoting someone stating that the film is less that perfect. I really enjjoy your posts, Celluloidkid.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Christopher Plummer and Julie Andrews have always been best of friends. His comment about her was meant as a compliment. He was less than thrilled with being in the movie, though. Although over the years, he's certainly softened his opinion of it and praises it in supplementals on the DVD and in other interviews. He's also credited his career to the film. So, he's not an idiot.

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"So, he's not an idiot."

 

I love "The Sound of Music", but I can't find it anywhere in this thread where a poster is calling Christopher Plummer an idiot. He was far from it. "The Sound of Music" is one of my greatest childhood movie memories. It's certainly a film worth talking about, seeing over and over again, and one of the classics that I will always love.

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