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Go ahead, cry me a river.


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11 minutes ago, NavyFlyer1325 said:

Neither is the automatic assumption that young folks opinions are more meaningful or should be taken more notice of or thought more important just becasue they are younger and somehow closer to what's going on in today's world. Just look at the sheer idiocy of the following of the ridiculous Kardashian family. All they really are, are "famous for being famous".

That doesn't mean that the opinions of younger people at the same and should be classified as meaningless. Where does painting an entire generation with a single brush really get us?

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21 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

See what I mean?

Oh, yes, some of those folks back then DID play The Blues. Even Dusty and Billy and Frank (early ZZ Top) played some Blues originally. But I mean Led Zeppelin, Cream, Eric Clapton, and others I listened to back then, had heard the original Black Delta Bluesmen that John Mayall brought over to England in early to mid-60's. Their music was reborn over there, incorporated, reinterpreted into Rock form, and thus reinserted into the USA. It might've even been lost were it not for Mayall. Took me 30 years to find out that many of those songs were pioneered around Clarksdale, MS, Memphis, TN, and New Orleans, LA, or thereabouts (Hwy. 61). Even the Beatles had some Blues tunes woven into a few of their songs.

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7 minutes ago, JamesStewartFan95 said:

Where does painting an entire generation with a single brush really get us?

Obviously, you didn't get the point that I was replying to someone who didn't like that I was pointing out young folks don't know as much as they think they do (they are too engrossed in their phones), and get too much credit automatically just for being young. Please read the entire thread next time.

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1 hour ago, JamesStewartFan95 said:

That doesn't mean that the opinions of younger people at the same and should be classified as meaningless. Where does painting an entire generation with a single brush really get us?

The only opinions that are more meaningful are those from people that are more exposed to the material being judged.    E.g.   If one has seen only a handful of studio-era movies,   and was asked what their favorite studio-era films were, their opinion would NOT be as meaningful as someone that has seen hundreds of studio-era films. 

Age does correlate to exposure;  E.g. the less time on this earth, the less time total time one has to watch studio-era films,   but that isn't always the case.    

Also I wonder why anyone would assume the creator of this thread was 'young'.    

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13 minutes ago, NavyFlyer1325 said:

Even the Beatles had some Blues tunes woven into a few of their songs.

What do you mean by 'Blues tunes woven into a few of their songs'?    

Did you mean to say blues chord progressions like I \ IV \ V.? 

 

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9 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

What do you mean by 'Blues tunes woven into a few of their songs'?    

Did you mean to say blues chord progressions like I \ IV \ V.? 

 

Perhaps as one example, would I be correct in assuming that this would be the case in their "I Want You(She's So Heavy)" song from Abbey Road, James?

 

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11 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Perhaps as one example, would I be correct in assuming that this would be the case in their "I Want You(She's So Heavy)" song from Abbey Road, James?

 

I Want You isn't an example of a blues progression (but you know it sounds like one so I had to check the sheet music to be sure). 

Instead the Ballad of John and Yoko is pure I \ IV \ V in the key of E.     A song like I Saw Her Standing There uses the same chord progression but with the addition of a C (over the 'Oh,,,,when I saw her standing there' part).  I assume Paul stole this C from Carl Perkins since Perkins used an additional C in Honey Don't (a song, as you know,  The Beatles did as a cover).  

Of course the John song Yer Blues from the White Album is a blues in E song but John adds a G chord which is unique.    

So Paul and John did use the standard blues progression in many of their songs but they would often add something unique.  Just another reason why I love those two as songwriters.

 

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12 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

A song like I Saw Her Standing There uses the same chord progression but with the addition of a C (over the 'Oh,,,,when I saw her standing there' part). 

 

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

 

To shorten a very long story, I'll just say that while fooling around with the tuning dial on my brother's crystal radio when I was VERY young, I hit upon a radio station from Chicago( I lived and still live in the Metro Detroit area) I stopped and listened because the music sounded like the "rock'n'roll" I'd hear ordinarily throughout the day on the "family" radio we had in the kitchen.  Yep, turned out it WAS a "blues" station, and I was hooked.

 

As it's said, everything comes from the blues.  Which my uneducated impertinence would amend to 'everything comes from the blues--and western swing.'

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12 hours ago, NavyFlyer1325 said:

Oh, yes, some of those folks back then DID play The Blues. Even Dusty and Billy and Frank (early ZZ Top) played some Blues originally. But I mean Led Zeppelin, Cream, Eric Clapton, and others I listened to back then, had heard the original Black Delta Bluesmen that John Mayall brought over to England in early to mid-60's. Their music was reborn over there, incorporated, reinterpreted into Rock form, and thus reinserted into the USA. It might've even been lost were it not for Mayall. Took me 30 years to find out that many of those songs were pioneered around Clarksdale, MS, Memphis, TN, and New Orleans, LA, or thereabouts (Hwy. 61). Even the Beatles had some Blues tunes woven into a few of their songs.

Let's then take the time to point out that many of the "boomers" heroes graduated from M-U(Mayall university ;) )--

ERIC CLAPTON, MICK TAYLOR, MICK FLEETWOOD, PETER GREEN, ROGER DEAN, JACK BRUCE, PAUL BUTTERFIELD , AYNSLEY DUNBAR to name but a few.

As for "older" generation artists doing "blues", I remarked in another forum back on the 20th of this month, that it was the 130th anniversary of HUDDIE LEDBETTER's (aka: LEADBELLY) birthday, whose "Good Night Irene" was covered by Sinatra and other contemporaries of Frank.

And although many attribute THIS song to him, it's considered a "traditional" old tune, but his recordings of it might have been the influence behind a recording many of you might be more familiar with ;)  Give a listen---

Sound familiar? :D

Sepiatone

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Sep--My favorite British Invasion singer, Eric Burdon, studied and performed with John Lee Hooker and Bo Diddley.

I've been aware of Bo Diddley all my life, but I didn't know anything about John Lee Hooker.  Eric's promotion of this great blues artist, not only got me to buy his records, but also gave this man the career that he finally deserved here and in Europe.

 

The great George Thorogood also drank at the trough of these two fine American artists.

 From John Lee Hooker, George Thorogood recorded two of my favorite Hooker numbers:

  " One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer" and "House Rent Blues".

 

 Eric covered what had to be my favorite Hooker number, "Dimples";

"  You got dimples in your jaw

     You're my baby

      I got my eyes on you"

 

But Eric had a lot more audacity than the others. He didn't bury his favorite black American blues artists on an album.  No, he, along with The Animals, had the guts to put out John Lee Hooker's "Boom, Boom" as a 45 and it hit the Billboard 100.

  He must have had his Mojo working. LOL

 

 

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On 1/13/2018 at 7:05 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Dargo-- What you said reminded me of a creepy song that I used to love in college called " Mama Told Me Not to Come".

I think this was a Three Dog Night song. I never cared that much for them, but they put it over in a cute way.

But when I heard Eric Burdon, my favorite British Invasion rock /blues singer, do his version he knocked it out of the park. Some songs Just are more conducive to certain artists. Or you could also say, some artists know how to utilize their material better than others.

And one of the things that I always liked so much about Eric Burdon was  no matter what material he had, he knew how to make the most of it and put his own indelible mark on it.

Even after all these years when I hear " The House of the Rising Sun",it still sounds fresh and gritty to me.

In the 60s, The Stones and The Animals used to do some of the same Rock classics on their albums--One particular song by Chuck Berry was called "Around and Around".  I was totally amazed how different both of their versions sounded. 

The Stones:

Keith Richards,  Brian Jones, Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman were light years ahead of The Animals in terms of their instrumentation and approach to playing. Simply put, The Stones were the most technically Superior Group in the British Invasion. 

 But I always preferred to listen to The Animals version of "Around and Around because Eric Burdon simply understood the song and knew how to sing it better than Mick Jagger. Jagger was good for television with his quirky little dancing jerks and he wrote some good songs better suited to his own ability with Keith Richards, but when it came to singing these rock and roll standards, he just didn't really come up to snuff.

 

I totally agree with you, Princess about "MTMNTC". I was never much of a fan of Three Dog Night [not that there is anything wrong with them] but they always seemed to put a cutesy spin on songs, and I too much prefer the Eric Burdon version of this Randy Newman song. Burdon could put anything over, even "HOTRS" which I would always wonder why more women weren't singing it, based on the lyrics. I do think the Animal's keyboardist, Alan Price was spectacular though and I loved his score for the film "O, Lucky Man" with Malcolm MacDowell.

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14 hours ago, slaytonf said:

As it's said, everything comes from the blues.  Which my uneducated impertinence would amend to 'everything comes from the blues--and western swing.'

Sorry,  it is just not true everything comes from the blues;  instead most western music comes from the II-V-I harmonic progression that was established way back in the classical music era.      

The vast majority of jazz standards and show tunes are II-V-I based (either major or minor).    After Gershwin was exposed to blues based music he incorporated blues progressions along with II-V-I progression,  as well as sustained minor chord progressions.     E.g. Summertime.     Overtime diminished chords were introduced to popular music (the devil's chord to uptight classical musicians) and jazz standard and show tunes became a hybrid of many different type of harmonic progression.   In the 50s Miles Davis made modal music (which does not use functional harmony) the rage.  

Rock uses mostly blues progression (with a splash of II-V-I and modal) but of course rock bands like Yes,  are called fusion bands for a reason;  the fusion is how they mixed various harmonic progressions (as well as odd time signatures) into something uniquely their own. 

 

 

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