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Gone With The Wind


xxmass
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Hi All, my all time favorite film is Gone With The Wind. On Christmas Eve my son in law and I were disscusing our favorite films. When I told him mine was GWTW he stated that Clark Gable was lucky to get the roll of Rhett Butler. He said that Victor Fleming had chosen Vincent Price for the part, and that Mr Price turned it down. I know that many actors tryed for the roll of Rhett Butler but Vincent Price????. Help lol. Has anyone heard this? I can't see anybody but Clark Gable playing Rhett Butler. I'll await any replys. Sincerly, Xxmass/ Larry.

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Listen, if your friend decides to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge...don't buy it. He's pulling your damn leg. Even author Margaret Mitchell has said she thought of Clark Gable when she wrote Rhett Butler.

 

I'm a fan of "Gone With the Wind." And I'm African-American/Puerto Rican. Go figure!

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I agree with Cinemaven. Clark's biggest competition was Gary Cooper who was originally pegged for the part by the studio but he turned it down. I've read a couple different reasons why he didn't want the part. One was that he thought the movie would bomb and another was b/c he didn't want to play a part where slave owners were seen as the good guys. I would think the latter is more likely the reason as he quite often stood up for people who were being treated unfarily whether they were other actors or crew members so I can see why he wouldn't want to be associated with slavery.

 

As much as I love Gary, it's hard to picture anyone else as Rhett Butler but Clark Gable and he was the fans choice as well judging by polls and articles from old movie magazines.

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The casting of Scarlett is the most fascinating part of the "Making of GWTW".

I'm a huge fan of "GWTW", Own a copy too!

I think that it is so fascinating that so many famous or soon-to-be-famous actresses were either screen-tested, auditioned, or considered for the role of Scarlett, including Katharine Hepburn, Norma Shearer, Bette Davis, Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Crawford, Lana Turner, Susan Hayward, Carole Lombard, Irene Dunne, Merle Oberon, Ida Lupino, Joan Fontaine, Loretta Young, Miriam Hopkins, Tallulah Bankhead, Frances Dee, and Lucille Ball.

 

I still that it is interesting that four actresses, including Jean Arthur and Joan Bennett, were still under consideration by December 1938, before filming began. But only two finalists, Paulette Goddard and Vivien Leigh, were tested in Technicolor, both on December 20, 1938. Selznick had been quietly considering Vivien Leigh since February 1938 when Selznick saw her in "Fire Over England" and "A Yank at Oxford".

 

Message was edited by: CelluloidKid

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INTERSTING FACTS ABOUT GWTW:

 

Vincent Price tested for the part of Ashley.

 

Margaret Mitchell's first choice to play Rhett Butler was Basil Rathbone

 

Lillian Gish had originally been approached to take on the part of Scarlett's mother.

 

Judy Garland was the leading contender for the role of Carreen O'Hara before her "Andy Hardy" co-star Ann Rutherford was cast, but she was tied up with commitments to another film directed by Victor Fleming: "The Wizard of Oz " (1939).

Ironically, Fleming would replace George Cukor on both "Oz" and "Wind"

 

Priscilla Lane was considered for the role of Melanie Wilkes

 

Billie Burke was considered for Aunt Pittypat Hamilton, but the producers thought she was too young (she was 54).

 

Hattie McDaniel was cast as Mammy after Louise Beavers, Etta McDaniel, Ruby Dandridge, and Hattie Noel were briefly considered.

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It's one of my all-time favorite movies too. But I certainly do get tired of people taking issue with the film for not telling the story from a different point of view. Margaret Mitchell's enduring story told the story that she wanted to tell, and no other. If other people have a different perspective, they should write the book that tells the story they want told, if they have the imagination and talent and patience and discipline that Margaret Mitchell had, to tell the story in her vision.

 

I'm glad that her book exists, so that it's clear in her own words, the story she was telling. The movie is wonderful, but as an interpretation of her book, some people think they can get away with attributing motives to her characters that I don't believe ever even occurred to her. Fortunately, they can't reasonably do that with the book-her own direct words. She wasn't telling a story about society in the South in general, she was telling the story of these characters-primarily Rhett and Scarlett-and their piece of that history. Anything else was beyond the scope of the vision Margaret Mitchell had for her tale. And it's so good, I don't see why it needs to be more. If someone else thinks that something's missing, let them go write that book.

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