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Dorothy Malone (1925-2018)


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Oscar-winning actress Dorothy Malone has died at age 92.

She made her credited debut in 1943's The Falcon and the Co-Eds as Dorothy Maloney. She appeared in such notable films as The Big SleepNight and DayTorpedo AlleyThe Fast and the FuriousSincerely YoursMan of a Thousand FacesWarlock, and many more.

She won her Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for 1956's Written On the Wind. She made her last screen appearance in 1992's Basic Instinct.

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0781e319df0d4271e6465d355264a493--year-o

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A few nights ago I watched the Peyton Place TV movies. One was made in 1977 and another in 1985. She appeared in both, reprising her role from the weekly series. A great actress. She's never had a Summer Under the Stars tribute on TCM, or even a primetime spotlight.

In one interview I read she said she was happiest making westerns. She did a lot of them:

Screen shot 2018-01-19 at 6.06.04 PM.png

SOUTH OF ST. LOUIS
COLORADO TERRITORY
THE NEVADAN
SADDLE LEGION
THE BUSHWACKERS
LAW & ORDER
JACK SLADE
THE LONE GUN
FIVE GUNS WEST
TALL MAN RIDING
AT GUNPOINT
TENSION AT TABLE ROCK
PILLARS OF THE SKY
QUANTEZ
WARLOCK
THE LAST SUNSET

Screen shot 2018-01-19 at 6.07.21 PM.png

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I never think of Dorothy Malone as being a major movie star or a major actress in Hollywood.

But she turns out to be a major actress in two of my favorite films:

 Young at Heart directed by Gordon Douglas and Written on the Wind directed by Douglas Sirk. She appeared with Robert Keith in both movies.

In the latter film, she plays an in- your-face to the hilt nymphomaniac who  sexually harasses Rock Hudson throughout the whole film, picks up a gasoline station attendant when her father owns the entire oil company, and after that incident, she has a wild Latino music impromptu dance routine in her room, as her father, Keith, climbs the stairs to reprimand her. But he never makes it to the top--dying of a heart attack midway, As the sensual sexually out -of -control Dorothy dances on . There she won her Oscar.

The main Oscar pay back that Dorothy Malone got was starring in the hit show Peyton Place - - where she often reminded all of the young rising stars on the show, Mia Farrow being the most popular, that she was the star because, after all, she had won the Oscar. 

However, I do remember one time Dorothy Malone actually starred in a film that was not only an above average outing, but was also a historical Hollywood vehicle-- Too Much,  Too Soon. This film is based on the life of John  Barrymore's actress daughter Diana Barrymore. ( if you don't know what she looked like, you really must Google her because Drew Barrymore is just about a dead ringer for her.) What makes Too Much, Too Soon even more Hollywood freaky is that one of John Barrymore's friends, Errol Flynn, portrayed him in the movie.

I don't know much about Dorothy's personal life except that she had an exceedingly, romantically, stormy marriage with Ginger Rogers' French discovery and ex-husband, the hypnotically handsome Jacques Bergerac.

Dorothy was a beautiful and competent actress, who gave me some memorable moments in cinema.

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Malone had been one of only two surviving Best Supporting Actress winners from before the 1960's. With her passing, that leaves only Eva Marie Saint (age 93, winner for 1954). 1960's winners that are still around include Shirley Jones (age 83, winner for 1960), Rita Moreno (age 86, winner for 1961), Estelle Parsons (age 90, winner for 1967), and Goldie Hawn (age 72, winner for 1969).

Furthest back survivors in other categories include George Chakiris (age 83, winner of Best Supporting Actor for 1961), Sidney Poitier (age 90, winner of Best Actor in 1963), and of course Olivia de Havilland (age 101, winner for Best Actress in 1946).

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50 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Malone had been one of only two surviving Best Supporting Actress winners from before the 1960's. With her passing, that leaves only Eva Marie Saint (age 93, winner for 1954). 1960's winners that are still around include Shirley Jones (age 83, winner for 1960), Rita Moreno (age 86, winner for 1961), Estelle Parsons (age 90, winner for 1967), and Goldie Hawn (age 72, winner for 1969).

Furthest back survivors in other I categories include George Chakiris (age 83, winner of Best Supporting Actor for 1961), Sidney Poitier (age 90, winner of Best Actor in 1963), and of course Olivia de Havilland (age 101, winner for Best Actress in 1946).

I've worked with several supporting actress winners. The three earliest -- now departed -- are Teresa Wright, Kim Hunter, and Celeste Holm. Also worked with Marcia Gay Harden, Marisa Tomei, and dear Estelle, who is working even as she approaches 90. Talented ladies all.

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I'm sorry to hear of the death of Dorothy Malone who, although she never made it as one of the front rank stars, did commendable work in a number of films, her acting career first born during the Hollywood studio era.

I know that many probably best associate her with the popular Peyton Place television series, a huge hit for her during the '60s. There was also, of course, her best supporting actress Oscar win for Written on the Wind.

I tend to associate her with two movies, one a small part, early in her career but, oh, what an impression she made, as the bookstore clerk who takes off her glasses and literally lets down her hair after Bogie's Philip Marlowe enters her establishment in The Big Sleep. What a sensual, sultry impression she made in those few on screen minutes.

More than a decade later, following her Oscar win, came the second film with which I most associate her, Too Much Too Soon, playing Diana Barrymore, the love starved daughter of acting legend John. It's a tawdry, sensationaliistic biography, but Miss Malone sensitively gave it her all, along with Errol Flynn playing her father, and between their two performances managed to make the film worth watching.

One more thing, along with being a capable actress, I always thought of Dorothy Malone as one of the real beauties of the screen.

Dorothy-Malone-Flickr-kate-gabrielle-SRR

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First film jumpeth to mind is Warlock.

Swithin, you mention Marcia Gay Harden. The first film jumpeth is The Dead Girl, though there is much of her stuff I haven't seen. She is  heart-rending as the mother.

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I've always enjoyed her work on screen.

And I never get tired of watching her in "Written On The Wind".

Her dialogue with brother Robert Stack is especially memorable.

RIP, Miss Malone, you were a treasure.

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

First film jumpeth to mind is Warlock.

Swithin, you mention Marcia Gay Harden. The first film jumpeth is The Dead Girl, though there is much of her stuff I haven't seen. She is  heart-rending as the mother.

She is equally heart-rending as Celeste Boyle in Mystic River. That shot of her at the end, after her husband (Tim Robbins) is killed, as she chases the parade to get a glimpse of her son, is amazing. I worked with her on a theater gig in NYC many years ago. 

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23 minutes ago, rayban said:

I've always enjoyed her work on screen.

And I never get tired of watching her in "Written On The Wind".

Her dialogue with brother Robert Stack is especially memorable.

RIP, Miss Malone, you were a treasure.

Bob Stack was nominated for the Best Supporting Actor role too. But he claims that studio politics blackballed him.

After that he went into television and won an Emmy as Eliot Ness on The Untouchables.

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She was "sexy" and "real" - which was an unusual combo in Hollywood films.

She breaks your heart trying to win over Rock Hudson in "Written on the Wind".

She and Robert Stack were the true "owners" of "Written on the Wind".

And she made a so-so film, "Too Much, Too Soon", memorable with her very substantial performance.

And, in the first part of the film, when she gets to work with Errol Flynn, true screen magic was achieved.

She held the screen - you wanted to watch her.

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8 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Bob Stack was nominated for the Best Supporting Actor role too. But he claims that studio politics blackballed him.

After that he went into television and won an Emmy as Eliot Ness on The Untouchables.

Yes, Anthony Quinn won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar that year for his performance in "Lust For Life".

But Robert Stack's performance in "Written on the Wind" was clearly the superior one.

In that film, Dorothy Malone could so easily cut him in half.

And he suffered greatly with every cutting remark.

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13 hours ago, Swithin said:

So sorry to hear this! Here's one of the iconic shots of the '50s:

e970cdfa1705cbb9629ad7fcbb972fa8--the-wi

Meaning no disrespect to Ms. Malone, You gotta wonder what FREUD would have made out of that symbolism?

Yes, it's sad news, but she IS on my list of "thought was long dead" film stars.

Sepiatone

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I liked Ms. Malone in Battle Cry and, of course, Written on the wind, but she also did a great job I'm her many westerns.  Two standouts were The Last Sunset and Pillars in the Sky.  Also check her out in The Tarnished Angels.

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17 minutes ago, Fedya said:

She's also in the surprisingly good The Killer That Stalked New York.

Malone is also very effective in a small role in another noir, Pushover (kind of a follow up to Double Indemnity with Kim Novak and MacMurray, released in 1954).

  

 

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18 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I never think of Dorothy Malone as being a major movie star or a major actress in Hollywood.

But she turns out to be a major actress in two of my favorite films:

 Young at Heart directed by Gordon Douglas and Written on the Wind directed by Douglas Sirk. She appeared with Robert Keith in both movies.

In the latter film, she plays an in- your-face to the hilt nymphomaniac who  sexually harasses Rock Hudson throughout the whole film, picks up a gasoline station attendant when her father owns the entire oil company, and after that incident, she has a wild Latino music impromptu dance routine in her room, as her father, Keith, climbs the stairs to reprimand her. But he never makes it to the top--dying of a heart attack midway, As the sensual sexually out -of -control Dorothy dances on . There she won her Oscar.

The main Oscar pay back that Dorothy Malone got was starring in the hit show Peyton Place - - where she often reminded all of the young rising stars on the show, Mia Farrow being the most popular, that she was the star because, after all, she had won the Oscar. 

However, I do remember one time Dorothy Malone actually starred in a film that was not only an above average outing, but was also a historical Hollywood vehicle-- Too Much,  Too Soon. This film is based on the life of John  Barrymore's actress daughter Diana Barrymore. ( if you don't know what she looked like, you really must Google her because Drew Barrymore is just about a dead ringer for her.) What makes Too Much, Too Soon even more Hollywood freaky is that one of John Barrymore's friends, Errol Flynn, portrayed him in the movie.

I don't know much about Dorothy's personal life except that she had an exceedingly, romantically, stormy marriage with Ginger Rogers' French discovery and ex-husband, the hypnotically handsome Jacques Bergerac.

Dorothy was a beautiful and competent actress, who gave me some memorable moments in cinema.

Wonderful exegesis of her career and life, Princess!

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23 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Malone is also very effective in a small role in another noir, Pushover (kind of a follow up to Double Indemnity with Kim Novak and MacMurray, released in 1954).

Fred MacMurray, Rock Hudson, Robert Stack and John Ireland were her most frequent leading men. 

*****

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 12.41.39 PM.png

The Malone-MacMurray titles are PUSHOVER; AT GUNPOINT and QUANTEZ.

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 12.49.31 PM.png

The Malone-Hudson titles are WRITTEN ON THE WIND; THE TARNISHED ANGELS and THE LAST SUNSET.

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 12.39.36 PM.png

The Malone-Stack titles are WRITTEN ON THE WIND; THE TARNISHED ANGELS; THE LAST VOYAGE; and a 1962 episode of The Untouchables.

Screen shot 2018-01-20 at 12.40.55 PM.png

The Malone-Ireland titles are THE BUSHWACKERS; SECURITY RISK; THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS and CARNAL CIRCUIT.

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