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xxmass
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Happy New Year All, Ok let's be honest. Does anybody out there watch AMC? How can this station show some really great films and cut the hell out of them. Not only do they edit, but they interupt there films with commericals every 10 minutes. How this station stays on the air is beyond me. So all I can say is God Bless TCM. Xxmass/Larry.

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I have e to confess to on VERY rare occasions watching AMC, only if they have a Eastwood, or John Wayne pic I like or Smokey and the Bandit for the100th time Other then that I pretty much bypass it along with Fox Movie and skip to either the mystery and other encore channels in my Dish package, once in a while IFC

 

Message was edited by: kennethlawson

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I haven't looked at the AMC schedule in years so I don't know what films they show or if they are truly "classic". But the channel doesn't care anymore.

 

Last week there was an article in the LATimes detailing the upcoming "re-branding" of many different cable channels - including AMC. Here's an excerpt -

 

=========================

Cable TV's search for identity

Stations such as Court TV and FX are tweaking programming and retooling

advertising campaigns in a bid to create brand awareness and build

audiences.

 

A few years ago, it looked like Court TV was all about courtrooms, FX

Network was for tough guys, and AMC ran only movies. In the coming months,

however, cable TV viewers will start to see things change.

 

Court TV will become TruTV. FX ads will explain "There is no box" its shows

fit into. And AMC will launch its third original scripted program.

 

 

 

Here's a sampling of what viewers can expect on basic cable in 2008:

 

AMC

 

AMC once called itself "Television for People Who Love Movies." Now it's

"The Future of Classic."

 

"What we're looking to do is combine the best movies with high-end scripted

originals," said general manager and executive vice president Charlie

Collier.

 

The movie channel tested the waters for original programming two years ago

with "Broken Trail," an Emmy-winning miniseries. Next came last summer's

"Mad Men," a Golden Globe-nominated drama. On Jan. 20, the network will

launch "Breaking Bad," a series about a "repressed everyman" diagnosed with

a fatal illness, Collier said.

 

Created by writer Vince Gilligan ("The X-Files"), "Breaking Bad" stars

Emmy-nominated actor Bryan Cranston ("Malcolm in the Middle") as a chemistry

teacher who becomes a manufacturer of crystal meth. Its producer, Mark

Johnson, and cinematographer John Toll have won Oscars. "This is as close as

you can get to film on television," Collier said.

 

Collier said he'd like AMC, like HBO, to be "creator-friendly," a network

where writers can bring smart projects they're passionate about and know

they will be produced in a high-quality, cinematic way. "We're working with

a lot of Hollywood talent," he said. He said classic movies will also be

curated and shown alongside individual projects to create an environment of

quality rather than just fill space. For instance, he said "Goodfellas" was

programmed to precede "Mad Men" since both had cinematic qualities and told

stories about "a group of men to whom the rules do not apply."

 

Other upcoming series and miniseries in development have been stalled during

the writers strike. "Breaking Bad," was kept to a seven-episode arc plus the

pilot. If the strike is resolved early in the year, "Mad Men" will begin to

film Season 2 and "we'll be able to keep the cadence going," he said.

 

In any case, he added, AMC has a core of classic movies. "If you have a

core, you have a foundation for a house. It's obviously architecturally

solid," he said.

 

===================

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I don't like AMC W./all the commercials!! Also AMC airs fewer classic movies than they did years ago.

Unlike TCM, AMC rarely showed widescreen films, such as those filmed in CinemaScope, in the letterbox format. Bob Dorian and Nick Clooney were regular hosts of AMC's telecasts, offering interesting production details on the films as well as some trivia. They are now gone.

The only good thing about AMC Along with Turner Classic Movies (and Ted Turner himself), AMC supported the restoration of historic, classic films, including the pre-1950 silver nitrate prints commonly used in Hollywood.

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Well, the fact of the matter is that unlike us, who are lovers of films shown as they were meant to be, the average tv viewer doesn't seem to be bothered by commercials or editing. AMC is a perfect example. Since they made their change, AMC is doing extremely well. Ratings have increased a great deal and they're making lots of money with commercials. From a business point of view it was a wise move. They lost an older less desired audience and replaced it with a fresh younger one which advertisers lust for.

 

I haven't watch AMC since they changed and never will, but I doubt that they really care.

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You are entitled to your opinion, just like everyone is on this board, but TCM has shaped up, now it shows cult movies, and have different themes every month, even through alot people complain, which I see no real reason to,butthat is because I happen enjoy the cult movies and the monthly themes and also for the most part TCM has remained the same, in that it shows true classic movies. And please don't say that there isn't a market for the silent movies they show late sunday nights/early Monday mornings, because there are many of us who enjoy silent movies, heck over the past two years I've been introduced to them, and have grown to love them, and maybe you could too, it all depends on ones taste, and I will respect your tastes as long as you respect mine.

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"The worst that can be said about TCM is that it hardly ever is a ratings winner. Hallmark & even AMC beat out TCM."

 

And you just don't get it. Because TCM doesn't sell advertising it isn't important if other channels have more viewers. Ratings numbers are used to sell an audience to advertisers. That's all they are good for.

 

TCM does request information from ratings services on particular programs or presentations but only for self-evaluation. But whether more people watch Hallmark or AMC is of no concern to the viability or long-term prospects for the channel. At best, TCM is interested in cultivating a loyal audience of various ages to ensure that the channel always has an audience rather than a large audience of advertiser-attractive younger viewers..

 

And the fact that Fox studio gave TCM the television rights to the Ford On Fox films that were presented in December tells me that the channel is doing just fine. It has obviously created a more important (and valuable) audience for promoting classic films and film heritage than their owm Fox Movie Channel.

 

If Apple Computers can survive (even thrive) in a PC world, then TCM can survive in a 300 channel cable universe by developing that same brand loyalty.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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It's no accident that "Silent Sunday Nights" are shown at midnight (ET.) While they are important part of of our film heritage they are a small part of it. It makes no sense to show such a small, albeit, important group of films that has one of your smallest audiences in a slot where you trying to attract the most viewers. Small wonder that TCM Imports follows this at 2:00am (ET.) Presumably for similar reasoning.

 

If TCM were all about ratings they would have changed a long time ago. I think they see themselves as a kind of "America's Film Library" and I am grateful.

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I love the "Fox Movie Channel"! At a job I worked at which had a satellite in the break room got this channel! I really wish that it was offered in Phoenix, Az on COX cable which is not!

 

Fox Movie Channel mostly shows movies from 20th Century Fox's library from the mid-1930s to the 1990s, including some television movies.

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What your forgetting is that when it shows something at midnight eastern time, it actually moving up a hour to 11:00 in Texas, and eventually 3 hours earlier in in California, so Midnight in NY State translates to 9:00pm I believe in Califorina, so That Silent movie is on at 9:00pm in the evening .is actually in prime time somewhere in the us.

I actually make out here in the eastern time zone because most of the regular channels repeat their prime time schedule at midnight so I can watch one thing and record whats opposite it when its repeated later overnight, and get both show I wanted to see,

 

AS for AMC I haven't paid any attention to it too much in years ,as I said, except for a rare movie once in a great while

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You know I thought of that and then forgot to put in in. Thanks for pointing it out. I think TCM had thought of putting a west coast broadcast but it never got worked out and I haven't heard anything about it since.

 

Maybe the question has become since so much stuff is being recorded does it make a difference.

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I used to watch A.M.C. every chance i got. They had Great Old and New Movies in Widescreen Format-A must for Me- and when they showed Leslie Neilson with The 3 Stooges i lived in front of the T.V., thank God for my V.C.R...

I now refer to A.M.C. as American Mutilated Classics.

Robert O'sbourne said right after A.M.C. started putting commercials in their movies and Butchering them beyond belief,

 

"This is a Channel that Prides itself on Movie Preservation and now they're Butchering their Movies. It's really Sad."

 

Thank You Turner Classic Movies for leaving Movies the way they should be,

 

Complete, UnCut and Widescreen.

 

Now if only Mr. Turner would start, Turner Television Classics, Complete, UnCut T.V. Shows

And start it off with ALF.

 

A TCM Fan for Life

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That gives me a idea for a sister network, a the old tv show everything from Lucy and Dick Van Dyke and all the old classic tv shows run in order completely uncut and with back stories to go with them, Kinda like tvland dose only with class and style... Call it TCT Turner Classic TV

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Ken, and that's exactly what TVLAND started as but has all but abandoned. I think they're getting TWO AND A HALF MEN shortly, and will be able to show 18 straight episodes every day. You ARE saving me a place on your palm-studded beach, aren't you? I'll bring the little mai-tai umbrellas - I think you and I will find those JUST as appropriate with your lovely winter weather.

 

Fortunately, it's so easy for me to abandon both channels for huge segments of every month. I guess that's their goal and they're very good at achieving it.

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I love "Silent Sundays", my only complaint is that it gets preempted too often!

 

TCM should have a "pre-Code" Tuesday, or whatever evening would be good for that.

 

I never watch AMC, but every once in a while I sneak a look at Fox if they're showing Betty Grable movies.

 

I wish they'd show "Forever Amber".

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Ollie;

 

I didn't realize that TvLand had at one time had a "Higher Ideal" then just nonstop oldies programing. That they dreamed of showing and having respect for all the tv shows that came before us. By the time I found it It was commercialized beyond reconigaziation I have watched it on occasion but not in a long time.. Now the only honorable thing they do is the annual TvLand honers show, I don't even remember they're doing that in the last couple of years, They should look at TCM and take notes...lol but we know they won't... Bringing in the new shows seems to be going against what they say they stand for,,, but hey, what do we know.... we're only the consumers...who don't watch their network anymore... OOPs preaching again...

 

I didn't realize that TvLand had at one time had a "Higher Ideal" then just nonstop oldies programing. That they dreamed of showing and having respect for all the tv shows that came before us. By the time I found it It was commercialized beyond reconigaziation I have watched it on occasion but not in a long time.. Now the only honorable thing they do is the annual TvLand honers show, I don't even remember they're doing that in the last couple of years, They should look at TCM and take notes...lol but we know they won't... Bringing in the new shows seems to be going against what they say they stand for,,, but hey, what do we know.... we're only the consumers...who don't watch their network anymore... OOPs preaching again...

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Disney Channel did the same thing. They used to show great old series (like "Davy Crockett"), "Wonderful World Of Disney", and some of the great old Disney-produced movies (like the one called "Ballerina", which I got to see just before they changed the programming-just in time to fall in love with it but too late to tape it, and it's not available on VHS or DVD). They even showed the original Mickey Mouse Club.

 

Now it's a bunch of dumbed-down silly shows that are all the same----smart-alecky kid/kids who have spin-off careers as "singers".

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Back in the old days I was an AVID AMC viewer...I also loved Bravo when they showed uncut art & foreign films (today both of those channels suck the big bazoo). It's funny I have literally hundreds and hundreds of channels and my converter box is set on TCM and stays here! Oh occasionally I check out IFC or Sundance and I do enjoy Encore Westerns--they have good westerns and classic western shows like Big Valley Bat Masterson & Rileman, but TCM is where it's at. IMHO TV Land is a lost cause...and altho' Turner/Warner owns TBS & TNT they too aren't up to snuff....catering to the under 30 crowd. So let TCM show cult films that are less than classic to some...silent films that bore others...I don't care. The best deal on TV is TCM. End of story. Happy New Year everyone.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Our cable provider transitioned from the Nostalgia Channel to AMC around 1990. Bob Dorian was the original AMC host. Later Nick Clooney alternated as host. For a time Gene Klaven was another host.

 

For several years AMC programmed a great mix of classic movies from Fox, Paramount, Universal, and Columbia. There were also occasional movies from other studios, including the smaller studios. AMC had annual Film Preservation Festivals and raised money for that purpose.

 

Beginning around 1992 AMC began showing a few widescreen movies (sometimes shown after the pan and scan version of the same movie to give viewers a choice). The widescreen version of The Big Trail (1930) was hosted by Alec Baldwin on 27 April 2001, at the end of the AMC "classic" era.

 

From 1996-1998 AMC produced Remember Wenn, a drama series set in a Pittsburgh radio station circa 1939-41. The Lot, a drama series set in a movie studio, replaced Remember Wenn in 1999.

 

On Saturday mornings Bob Dorian hosted Movie Palace Memories from a variety of restored movie palaces, including Radio City Music Hall (owned by AMC's corporate entity). There were Betty Boop cartoons and Screen Songs (often mixing animation with a bouncing ball sing along led by popular performers of the day); Popular Science and Unusual Occupations shorts, all originally from Paramount; Fox Movietone or Paramount Eyes and Ears newsreels; Laurel & Hardy and a few other Hal Roach shorts; the next chapter from a cliff-hanger serial; followed by a featured film.

 

Occasionally there were Laurel & Hardy shorts marathons (that included some Spanish language versions); and a number of serials where all the chapters were run in a single four hour programming block.

 

AMC co-produced or showed a number of film documentaries and biographies.

 

Beginning around 1997 AMC began programming more 1960's and 1970's movies into the mix.

 

AMC hosts Bob Dorian and Nick Clooney departed in the summer of 1999. Commercials began airing between movies in late 1999/early 2000. There were attempts to attract younger viewers with the much younger John Burke as the main host. There were many more 1970's and 1980's movies added to the mix. There was frequent cross-promotion and programming blocks borrowed from AMC's second network "Romance Classics" (later WE--Women's Entertainment). Leslie Nielsen hosted a series of Three Stooges shorts. The American Pop series was aimed at "babyboomers." While I am a babyboomer I always prefered early talkies through the film noir era so my AMC viewing dropped way off. Toward the end of this period about the only classic movies AMC programmed were those of Shirley Temple; and classic Universal horror films shown in the Monsterfest series, sometimes with such guest hosts as Linda Blair, Carmen Electra and Whoopi Goldberg to appeal to younger viewers.

 

In 2001 commercials interrupted movies and there were very few "classics" in the programming mix. My AMC viewing had ended. John Burke departed sometime in 2001. In 2002, as I surfed channels, I saw that American Movie Classics had become "amc" and completed their youth transition where a bunch of twenty-somethings sat around spewing mindless chatter about 1980's and 1990's movies.

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The movie channel tested the waters for original programming two years ago

with "Broken Trail," an Emmy-winning miniseries. Next came last summer's

"Mad Men," a Golden Globe-nominated drama. On Jan. 20, the network will

launch "Breaking Bad," a series about a "repressed everyman" diagnosed with

a fatal illness, Collier said.

 

From 1996-1998 AMC produced Remember Wenn, a drama series set in a Pittsburgh radio station circa 1939-41.

 

Thank you TalkieTime for bringing back AMC when it meant something. It even had it's own monthly movie magazine, featuring articles and photos of movie stars from the golden age. The above quote from an article on amc shows that they don't even acknowledge the original programming on AMC into the early 2000s. I realy enjoyed their Backstory series on different film classics, the Darryl Hannah hosted series on Hollywood designers, even though they would always have to update it to the (very different atmosphere) present, I guess to attract these younger viewers. Oh well, Fox has gone the same route...almost no classic movies except around 3 AM, repeating the same tired 90s movies, and repeating them more than once during primetime, original programming consisting of promos for their new movies/tv shows, no more Fox Movietone news, or original previews of their classic movies. At least no commercial interruptions during movies yet, but for what they most often show, I'm not watching.

 

Unfortunately, the same mentality has gripped TV Land. Thank God for TCM, although the creeping of minor changes has set in....repeating movies twice a night, more and more 80s and 90s movies...did I see an advertisement for their first original series?

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Arturo,

 

On another thread there has been heated discussion of the perceived "trend" toward more recent movies on TCM. Here is my follow-up posting in that discussion:

 

I don't want to see TCM go the way of AMC. In an earlier post I described AMC from the good years 1990 through the 1997/1998 period and its downfall through the 1999/2002 period. AMC abandoned a great heritage when it ceased to be "American Classic Movies."

 

It seems to me that before TCM came on the scene in 1994 Turner Network Television (TNT) was the prototype for TCM. In the early 1990s the Turner film library formed the main part of TNT's programming. There were themed days/programming blocks made up of gangster films, musicals, romance, heros, classic literature, classic shorts and other "in-betweens," featured actors/actresses, etc. The "classics" were often programmed late in the evening, over-night, or in the morning hours. More recent films were shown in the afternoons and "prime-time." And there were commercials. TNT and AMC were my favorite cable channels in those days.

 

When Turner Broadcasting brought TCM into its cable lineup in 1994 the former TNT programming was moved over to TCM where the movies were shown uncut and without commercials. (In my household we had TCM for the first half of 1997 but not again until 2004.)

 

Since TCM and AMC did not receive advertising revenue or a premium level of subscription revenue, both networks actually competed for the most viable business arrangements with the various cable providers. Since TCM and AMC shared a specific and limited "niche" viewership that would likely support but one such network per cable provider, one or the other network seemed doomed to fail. AMC blinked first by adding commercials to increase revenue; and to increase viewership soon after that there followed drastic format changes designed to draw in younger viewers. Advertising revenue increased with increased viewership ratings. Instead of programming classic movies uncut and without commercials, the "bottom line" became AMC's cause.

 

While the great old AMC was lost between 1999-2002, we should not draw too close a comparison between AMC and TCM. The familial comparison should be to TNT, where the emphasis became made-for-TV movies and reruns of TV series from other broadcast networks, all supported by advertising revenue based upon viewership ratings. There is a place in the spectrum of networks for this programming. TNT and several other networks serve this audience. One might even say that this market segment is over-saturated.

 

We need to remember these factors as we discuss particular "trends" with the present-day TCM.

 

We need not be so concerned with what we perceive as a change in programming or emphasis. There is only one network serving the "classic movies" niche. While Fox Movie Channel might compete with TCM I understand that they have chosen to fill a somewhat different niche than TCM. (I do not subscribe to FMC but I have read others' comments.)

 

We need to be more concerned that TCM might determine that it needs commercial advertising to remain a viable business. At that moment TCM becomes less concerned with revenue through a per-capita of subscribers; and becomes reliant upon viewership ratings/demographics that determines advertising revenue. Such a scenario is more likely to bring on the demise of TCM as we know it.

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