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CaveGirl

Forgotten Classics

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Sometimes one goes to find a new movie to watch, when there is something so much better available from the past.

One such film is Rene Clements' movie "Jeux Interdits" [aka "Forbidden Games"]. Sounding like some Sadean romp, it is actually a truly moving film about a small girl, orphaned by Nazi treachery which kills her parents to leave her wandering alone and lost, who is befriended by a family of farm people. The title refers to a ritualistic chain of events which involve the child and her new male friend. The pangs of death encompassing their world causes them to take action in some sort of seemingly on the surface morbid activity, but one which is vital to the healing of both participants. This movie starred Bridget Fossey who later went on to adult roles in French films. Rene Clement of course was the director of the wonderful take on the Patricia Highsmith character, Tom Ripley in his "Purple Noon" from 1960.

This 1952 movie was the Grand Prize winner at the Venice Film Festival and is still a touching and deeply emotionally rendered expose of the aftermath of war. I can highly recommend it.

Name a film from the past that has lost its following a bit, or is not shown much, but deserves more attention.

 

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There's a film I found on YouTube recently, a British legal comedy from 1962, that really impressed me. I'd never heard of it before and its title (with an obvious bit of innuendo implied) is:

screen.jpg

Director Ralph Thomas is fairly well-known. But for some reason his other works tend to eclipse this picture, rather unfairly I might add. 

What I loved about it were the very thoughtful courtroom scenes that mixed authentic questions of law with over-the-topic antics. James Robertson Justice is perfectly cast as the authoritarian judge. And the very attractive leads work well together (Michael Craig & Mary Peach). Plus Ron Moody makes his big screen debut.

But it really belongs to veteran character actress Brenda De Banzie, who steals the picture and refuses to give it back. There's a huge twist with her character in the last twenty minutes of the film I did not see coming. It nearly changes the outcome of the trial, and she does such a great job hiding the character's secret in the first two-thirds of the story that when the truth comes out, it is very memorable. 

Highly recommended and hope TCM plays it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Pair_of_Briefs

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I'm not sure if TCM ever showed 449th  PARALLEL,  But I remember seeing it long ago broadcast from the (across the river) Windsor, Ont. TV station as a kid.   I only remember  it being about people trying to enter the United States through Canada to escape Nazi tyranny.  I remember one scene in which a guy(an actor I'm not familiar with) hid in the bottom of a rowboat and floated across a river to America.  And as a kid, I thought it was possibly the Detroit river, but that was just youthful romanticizing.  I also recall at the end that RAYMOND MASSEY, with an evil look in his eye, and brushing his nose with a thumb held out from his fist saying, "I'm not asking for those pants back, I'm taking 'em!"

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm not sure if TCM ever showed 449th  PARALLEL,  But I remember seeing it long ago broadcast from the (across the river) Windsor, Ont. TV station as a kid.   I only remember  it being about people trying to enter the United States through Canada to escape Nazi tyranny.  I remember one scene in which a guy(an actor I'm not familiar with) hid in the bottom of a rowboat and floated across a river to America.  And as a kid, I thought it was possibly the Detroit river, but that was just youthful romanticizing.  I also recall at the end that RAYMOND MASSEY, with an evil look in his eye, and brushing his nose with a thumb held out from his fist saying, "I'm not asking for those pants back, I'm taking 'em!"

Sepiatone

It was actually the Nazis, from a scuttled u-boat, trying to make their way through Canada to the US to rendezvous with a rescue party. The movie was meant to show the resilience of the Canadian people. It was also released as The Invaders. Laurence Olivier, Anton Walbrook, Glynis Johns, and Leslie Howard also show up for brief roles like Massey's. Eric Portman was good as the leader of the Nazis. 

I like the movie, too, and think it should be shown more often.

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13 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm not sure if TCM ever showed 449th  PARALLEL,  

They have shown it in the past (I've a recording from 2011), but I don't recollect it turning up very recently. It could do with another airing.

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It was actually the Nazis, from a scuttled u-boat, trying to make their way through Canada to the US to rendezvous with a rescue party. The movie was meant to show the resilience of the Canadian people. It was also released as The Invaders. Laurence Olivier, Anton Walbrook, Glynis Johns, and Leslie Howard also show up for brief roles like Massey's. Eric Portman was good as the leader of the Nazis. 

I like the movie, too, and think it should be shown more often.

I had forgotten this film. It was one of the last movies that Leslie Howard made before he was killed. Leslie's last three movies were all  promoting the British war effort, including  Pimpernel Smith and Spitfire.

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I had forgotten this film. It was one of the last movies that Leslie Howard made before he was killed. Leslie's last three movies were all  promoting the British war effort, including  Pimpernel Smith and Spitfire.

Well, yeah.  "Forgotten Classics". ;)

After I posted I took a look in some places and also found out it was the only movie in which Canadian RAYMOND MASSEY played the role of a Canadian. :wacko:

Imagine spending an entire career representing yourself and your country that rarely.  Hell, even ANTHONY QUINN portrayed MEXICANS a few times more. ;)

Sepatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, yeah.  "Forgotten Classics". ;)

After I posted I took a look in some places and also found out it was the only movie in which Canadian RAYMOND MASSEY played the role of a Canadian. :wacko:

Imagine spending an entire career representing yourself and your country that rarely.  Hell, even ANTHONY QUINN portrayed MEXICANS a few times more. ;)

Sepatone

LOL

Funny comment here Sepia, and probably true, but I'd also like to point out that the film's title is actually "49th Parallel", and which of course is the north latitude line of demarcation of which much of the border between the U.S. and Canada was/is drawn.

(...btw, really like this film too...and yeah, I think it's been at least a couple of years since TCM has shown it)

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59 minutes ago, Dargo said:

but I'd also like to point out that the film's title is actually "49th Parallel"

I was waiting for someone to spot them extra parallels... :)

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"The Last Wave" (1977) one of director Peter Weir's best but lesser known films. According to a TCM article, it was poorly distributed in US because, altho United Artists put up half the money, they passed on distributing it. It was finally shown by a distributor known for martial arts movies and re-titled "Black Rain".  It was relegated to art house movie theaters and was called "a throw-back to the B-movies of the 30s and 40s and the dialogue is vintage RKO and Universal," by Pauline Kael of The New Yorker, "but it's hokum without the fun of hokum." She really hated it. (Although that review would make me want to watch it.) It was pretty panned and did poorly. 

I consider it a "classic" and I know it has been shown at least once on TCM. When you talk Weir you usually hear about "Picnic at Hanging Rock" or "Gallipoli". Everyone seems to have forgotten this great movie that explores the rational in an irrational world with mysticism and magic, and imagery that is breathtakingly weird. Maybe it's because Dr. Kildare (Richard Chamberlain) was the lead and he was better known for TV than film. But it deserves more attention and more viewers.

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5 hours ago, limey said:

I was waiting for someone to spot them extra parallels... :)

Hell, didn't even spot it.  And I'M the one who POSTED IT!! :blink::D 

Sepiatone

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