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Best known as Dr. Henry Frankenstein in 1931's FRANKENSTEIN and 1935's BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, I always wondered why he never appeared in 1939's SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, until I learned he had died 2 years earlier of tuberculosis! 

Sad end to what could have been a very promising career. Who can forget his "It's alive! ALIVE!!" line in the original FRANKENSTEIN?

Of course he was also great in MAD LOVE too (as was Peter Lorre).

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11 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Best known as Dr. Henry Frankenstein in 1931's FRANKENSTEIN and 1935's BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, I always wondered why he never appeared in 1939's SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, until I learned he had died 2 years earlier of tuberculosis! 

Sad end to what could have been a very promising career. Who can forget his "It's alive! ALIVE!!" line in the original FRANKENSTEIN?

Of course he was also great in MAD LOVE too (as was Peter Lorre).

Beth-- I just love Colin Clive too; and "Mad Love" is my second favorite too.

 Right now I'm watching "History Is Made At Night"-- one of his last movies in 1937 before he died.

If you've already seen it,  don't tell me the ending. LOL

 

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TCM gave Clive his own primetime spotlight in December, kicking the evening off with Bride of Frankenstein and following up with One More River, a movie I'd never seen before. I don't know if he got to choose his role. Given the popularity of the Frankenstein movies, I would think he could have been the romantic male lead if he'd wanted to be. Instead he plays the brutish, abusive husband who refuses to give his wife (Diana Wynyard) a divorce when she begins an affair (sort of) with another man. Made at the very end of the pre-Code era, it still required some changes before release. In the original script, Clive's character was implied to take sexual pleasure from hurting women, but all those references were removed. A sexual encounter between Clive and his estranged wife and whether that encounter was consensual figures heavily into the plot, also a night spent together in a car by Wynyard and her would-be lover (Frank Lawton). Take out the naughty bits, and it's a bit of a stuffy manor drama, but I still enjoyed it. Also entertaining for TCM fans because lookalike character actors C. Aubrey Smith and Henry Stephenson are both in it and have scenes together! Just in case you thought they were the same person, like people used to say about Michael and Janet.

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1 minute ago, sewhite2000 said:

TCM gave Clive his own primetime spotlight in December, kicking the evening off with Bride of Frankenstein and following up with One More River, a movie I'd never seen before. I don't know if he got to choose his role. Given the popularity of the Frankenstein movies, I would think he could have been the romantic male lead if he'd wanted to be. Instead he plays the brutish, abusive husband who refuses to give his wife (Diana Wynyard) a divorce when she begins an affair (sort of) with another man. Made at the very end of the pre-Code era, it still required some changes before release. In the original script, Clive's character was implied to take sexual pleasure from hurting women, but all those references were removed. A sexual encounter between Clive and his estranged wife and whether that encounter was consensual figures heavily into the plot, also a night spent together in a car by Wynyard and her would-be lover (Frank Lawton). Take out the naughty bits, and it's a bit of a stuffy manor drama, but I still enjoyed it. Also entertaining for TCM fans because lookalike character actors C. Aubrey Smith and Henry Stephenson are both in it and have scenes together! Just in case you thought they were the same person, like people used to say about Michael and Janet.

This is a similar plot to the movie that I'm watching right now with Clive--" History Is Made at Night". In this one Colin Clive plays a hyper-jealous husband who won't believe his wife is faithful, but who also won't give her a divorce.  The casting is a little off-beat apart from Clive-- the long-suffering wife is, of all people, Jean  Arthur, while the man in Waiting is, of all people, Charles Boyer.  You can just imagine the rest.

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Clive won his movie letter in James Whale's 1930 film version of JOURNEY'S END. He plays Stanhope. A fine high-strung (of course) performance. This one is tied up in legal limbo. Hope it gets an official release some day.

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16 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

Clive won his movie letter in James Whale's 1930 film version of JOURNEY'S END. He plays Stanhope. A fine high-strung (of course) performance. This one is tied up in legal limbo. Hope it gets an official release some day.

The two of them started out together in the theater in London with this play. I have wanted to see the film version of the play for a long time.  Thanks for the information. Now I know that there's a reason why we can't see it-- but it doesn't make me feel any better about it. LOL

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16 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Best known as Dr. Henry Frankenstein in 1931's FRANKENSTEIN and 1935's BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, I always wondered why he never appeared in 1939's SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, until I learned he had died 2 years earlier of tuberculosis! 

Sad end to what could have been a very promising career. Who can forget his "It's alive! ALIVE!!" line in the original FRANKENSTEIN?

Of course he was also great in MAD LOVE too (as was Peter Lorre).

Love the way he pronounces the word "tissue" as something like "tiss-shew"!!!

He was also great in "Mad Love" as you mention, Beth!

Great post saluting a fine and fun to watch, unique actor.

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16 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Best known as Dr. Henry Frankenstein in 1931's FRANKENSTEIN and 1935's BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, I always wondered why he never appeared in 1939's SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, until I learned he had died 2 years earlier of tuberculosis! 

Sad end to what could have been a very promising career. Who can forget his "It's alive! ALIVE!!" line in the original FRANKENSTEIN?

Of course he was also great in MAD LOVE too (as was Peter Lorre).

Didn't he drop dead before Son?

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

This is a similar plot to the movie that I'm watching right now with Clive--" History Is Made at Night". In this one Colin Clive plays a hyper-jealous husband who won't believe his wife is faithful, but who also won't give her a divorce.  The casting is a little off-beat apart from Clive-- the long-suffering wife is, of all people, Jean  Arthur, while the man in Waiting is, of all people, Charles Boyer.  You can just imagine the rest.

I love History Is Made at Night. Great, stylish film. Jean Arthur and Charles Boyer have incredible chemistry (and clothes).

History-is-Made-at-Night-2.jpg

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20 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Didn't he drop dead before Son?

As Beth said, yes - he was a victim of TB (consumption, not TopBilled), complicated by alcohol use.

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Colin Live really appeared to have aged badly in the 7 years from his debut in Journey's End to History Is Made At Night. I saw a photo of him from the 1920's and he was quite a handsome man. 

BTW I just finished posting to the topic of Helen Chandler and remembered that they co starred in Christopher Strong. He played her father even though in real life he was only 6 years older than she. 

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CLIVE is super cool, but the British personality star i love most is MILES MANDER.

He can play straight, villain, or victim in any movie.

He has that certain sympathetic "something" that i like to watch.

 

He is a blast in THE BRIGHTON STRANGLER! (poster below)

MV5BZmY4NjQ2N2UtZThlOS00MGQ1LWE1YWYtZTQ4MDA4MTUyMjgyXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMDUyOTUyNQ@@__V1_UX100_CR0,0,100,100_AL_.jpg

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On 2/2/2018 at 12:10 PM, Princess of Tap said:

The two of them started out together in the theater in London with this play. I have wanted to see the film version of the play for a long time.  Thanks for the information. Now I know that there's a reason why we can't see it-- but it doesn't make me feel any better about it. LOL

 

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On 2/2/2018 at 12:10 PM, Princess of Tap said:

The two of them started out together in the theater in London with this play. I have wanted to see the film version of the play for a long time.  Thanks for the information. Now I know that there's a reason why we can't see it-- but it doesn't make me feel any better about it. LOL

A new version of Journey's End has just been released. It received moderately good reviews from the British press:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/04/journeys-end-review-sam-claflin-toby-jones

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/journeys-end-review-wonderfully-acted-first-world-war-drama/

journeys-end.jpg

 

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On ‎2‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 10:05 PM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Best known as Dr. Henry Frankenstein in 1931's FRANKENSTEIN and 1935's BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, I always wondered why he never appeared in 1939's SON OF FRANKENSTEIN, until I learned he had died 2 years earlier of tuberculosis! 

Sad end to what could have been a very promising career. Who can forget his "It's alive! ALIVE!!" line in the original FRANKENSTEIN?

Of course he was also great in MAD LOVE too (as was Peter Lorre).

He was a big time alcoholic & ended up passing away in '1937 ate age 37

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I just looked it up and apparently there was no real cure for tuberculosis until 1944. Vivien Leigh died of this in the 60s - if I remember correctly - just because she would not accept the diagnosis. Renee Adoree was another actress who died of tuberculosis in 1933.

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Colin Clive  had several unfortunate accidents concerning his leg. There's every reason to believe that he was in a great deal of constant pain and that his drinking was also aggravated by his desire to kill that pain.

It was his initial leg injury which forced him to give up a military career, when he sought to follow in the footsteps of his direct descendant Clive of India.  Colin appeared in the movie, Clive of India, which starred Ronald Colman.

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20 hours ago, calvinnme said:

I just looked it up and apparently there was no real cure for tuberculosis until 1944. Vivien Leigh died of this in the 60s - if I remember correctly - just because she would not accept the diagnosis. Renee Adoree was another actress who died of tuberculosis in 1933.

My Grandmother had tuberculosis around that time period.  I don't know all the details of her treatment, but for a specific reason( and too long of a story for here) she fled the sanatorium where she was being treated and managed to live to the age of 86, leaving us in 1993.  And for most of MY life seemed to be pretty robust.

Sepiatone

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