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Ernst Lubitsch and his films


konway87
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You know, I never thought of that before in connection with Sullavan's character, only with his irritation with Kralik for obvious reasons, but he did seem to take out his frustrations over his wife with everyone at the store..

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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Pirovitch mentions about the change in Mr. Matuschek's behavior. Its very possible Lubitsch used Mr. Matuschek's dislike towards Klara's blouse as an example to show how much Mr. Matuschek has changed.

 

Here is the dialogue before Kralik talks Klara about Mr. Matuschek's dislike towards Klara's blouse.

 

Kralik: Well, I got a big dinner date tonight.

Pirovitch: With Boss?

Kralik: Oh No, he never invites me anymore. How do you figure him out anyway?

Pirovitch: I give up. Its certainly very difficult to get along with him with these days.

Kralik: Yeah, he never talks to me anymore.

 

So we can see the change in Mr. Matuschek's attitude.

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I thought I should post comments from Great Directors about Ernst Lubitsch. I got the information from this link - http://www.lubitsch.com/potpouri.html

 

"A man of pure cinema." -- Alfred Hitchcock

 

"I worshipped him. I admired his work enormously. He went head and shoulders beyond everyone in the field of sophisticated high comedy. -- Joseph Mankiewicz

 

"Lubitsch was a prince." -- Francois Truffaut

 

"Lubitsch was a giant . . . his talent and originality were stupefying." -- Orson Welles

 

"He could do more to show the grace and humor of sex in a nonlustful way than any other director I've ever heard of." -- Charles Chaplin

 

"Ernst Lubitsch was the complete architect of motion pictures. His stamp was on every frame of film -- from conception to delivery. For high style, romantic comedies and spicy musicals he set a standard that has not been equaled. The Lubitsch 'touch' was unique." -- Frank Capra

 

"Ernst Lubitsch was truly the auteur of his films. He created a style of sophisticated comedy peculiarly his own, as well as a new style of musical, both unknown before his time. His films bore the recognizable and indelible stamp of the gay, clever, witty, mischevious master, whose delightful personality matched his work. I am proud to have known his as a friend and teacher. Lubitsch's films were truly Lubitsch's, possessive credit intended." -- William Wyler

 

"His films were loaded with a kind of wit which was specifically the essence of the intellectual Berlin in those days. This man was so strong that when he was asked by Hollywood to work there, he not only didn't lose his Berlin style but he converted the Hollywood industry to his own way of expression." -- Jean Renoir

 

And Billy Wilder's favorite director was Ernst Lubitsch.

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I decided to write this information as a seperate post. Did anyone notice Lubitsch uses Shakespeare in most of his films?

 

Shakespeare is mentioned in films like Bluebeard's wife, The Shop around the Corner, To be or not to be, and Cluny Brown.

 

In the Shop around the Corner, we see the line "half shakespeare and half me." I need a help. Can anyone explain this joke in To be or not to be "They named a brandy after Napoleon, they made a herring out of Bismarck, and the Fuhrer is going to end up as a piece of cheese!"?

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That's interesting to note about Lubitsch's penchant for Shakespeare. I have always thought that one of the few filmmakers Shakespeare would admire if he could have come back is Lubitsch. Something about Lubitsch's style but even more so what's underneath the style is so very Shakespearean in spirit to me.

 

Of course, Lubi did lots of Shakespeare when he worked in Max Reinhardt's company in Berlin.

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Konway----have you seen any of the dvds in the Lubitsch in Berlin set? Because there is a fanstastic documentary included on the disc with The Doll and has Lubi's daughter giving an extensive interview. You have to see it! It's filmed in Berlin and shows you the places he grew up and worked.

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Hi Konway,

 

I used to have *Angel* recorded on vhs and I watched it over and over and over again, almost as much as I used to watch Ninotchka. I'd be interested in how much I would like it now. Then, I was absolutely fascinated by it. It's a rather "static" film as I remember, very talky and subtle but I ate all that up. I was surprised when I learned it's held in poor regard by most. I thought it at the time nearly as good as Ninotchka.

 

I understand it was available on dvd for a minute overseas and I'd love to get my hands on one.

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I have another question. Have you seen Royal Scandal (1945)? Its a remake of Lubitsch's silent film forbidden paradise (1924). It is very hard to find the film.

 

I know that Ernst Lubitsch praised Tallulah Bankhead's performance in this film.

 

By the way, I don't know if anyone noticed this in The Shop around the Corner. Vadas shows "a diamond ring" to Kralik and he says "My grandma gave it to me." I think he is refering "Grandma" to Mrs. Matuschek.

 

What do you think about it?

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Hi Konway---I have never seen *A royal Scandal* unfortunately---have you? Do you know if it is available anywhere? I've never seen *Forbidden Paradise* either, which is tantalizing.

 

And I do believe that we are definitely being "told" that Vadas is being spoiled by Mrs M. He's what they'd call today her "boy toy".

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I just saw A Royal Scandal. I thought it was great. Charle Coburn, Vincent Price, and Sig Ruman were brilliant. Vincent Price's role wasn't a big role. But I thought he played the role brilliantly. I think this is the only film where Vincent Price is so funny.

 

Tallulah Bankhead was great too. What I liked about the film was to show the major problems in the world of Catherine the Great. Lubitsch showed all of these problems in a very funny way.

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What do you all think about Sig Ruman? He played Colonel Ehrhardt in To be or not to be. He played Iranoff in Ninotchka. But I thought his best performance was in Ernst Lubitsch's A Royal Scandal.

 

Billy Wilder later hired Sig Ruman to work with him. He worked with Billy Wilder in films like The Emperor Waltz, Stalag 17, and The Fortune Cookie.

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Did anyone notice this? The Color of Vadas' tie and Klara's dress are same.

 

Here is the link to see the tie of Vadas.

http://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=download&ufid=8C5CE387610A7323

 

Here is the link to Klara's dress.

 

http://www.lubitsch.com/shopset.html

 

As you all know, Lubitsch used symbolisms in his films like Hitchcock did.

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