Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

National Film Registry Year by Year


Recommended Posts

Kid Auto Races at Venice (1914)

A milestone in film history, “Kid Auto Races at Venice” features the debut of Charlie Chaplin’s little tramp character as he continually disrupts a cameraman trying to film a soapbox derby car race. A contemporary review in The Cinema noted, "Kid Auto Races struck us as about the funniest film we have ever seen. When we subsequently saw Chaplin in more ambitious efforts, our opinion that the Keystone Company had made the capture of their career was strengthened. Chaplin is a born screen comedian; he does things we have never seen done on the screen before.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lilies of the Field (1963)

From 1950 to 1980, Sidney Poitier ranked among the top American film stars (“No Way Out,” “Blackboard Jungle,” “Edge of the City,” “The Defiant Ones,” “Raisin in the Sun,” “Paris Blues,” “In the Heat of the Night,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”). In “Lilies,” Poitier has another of his classic roles where he plays an itinerant worker who helps refugee East European nuns build a chapel in Arizona. The nuns cannot pay him for the work and implore him to do so by citing various Biblical verses (Sermon on the Mount). Poitier, for his part, is moved by their plight but also wants to demonstrate his skills as an architect and builder. The film serves as a parable highlighting mutual respect via common purpose, the austere Arizona desert landscape, the impoverished nuns, and a man they believe God sent to help them. For his portrayal, Poitier became the first African American to win the Oscar for best actor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Losing Ground (1982)

One of the first feature films directed by an African American woman, Kathleen Collins’ “Losing Ground” tells the story of a marriage between two remarkable people, both at a crossroads in their lives. “Losing Ground” centers on the experiences of Sara (Seret Scott), an African American philosophy professor whose artist husband Victor (Bill Gunn) rents a country house for a month to celebrate a recent museum sale. The couple’s summer idyll becomes complicated as Sara struggles to research the philosophical and religious meaning of ecstatic experience ...and to discover it for herself.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Man With the Golden Arm (1955)

The subject of drug addiction has been addressed in Hollywood films many times before, dating all the way back to the silent era (Kevin Brownlow’s seminal “Behind the Mask of Innocence” chronicles these amazing early productions). But few dared to be as honest, blunt or graphic as this Otto Preminger treatment, which featured Frank Sinatra and Kim Novak. Sinatra stars as the heroin-addicted hero who, having gotten clean while in prison, now struggles to remain “straight” after release. Oscar-nominated for his work in the film, Sinatra is a raw nerve in his unvarnished portrayal of a “junkie,” most memorably in his brutal withdrawal scenes. Along with its still topical subject and powerful storytelling, the film is further enhanced by its eye-popping Saul Bass opening credits sequence and Elmer Bernstein’s remarkable jazz score. Critic Dave Kehr has noted that “Otto Preminger's 1955 adaptation of Nelson Algren's novel is something of a crossroads movie, suspended between the swirling expressionism of Preminger's early career and the balanced realism that would later become his forte.”  The film was preserved by the Academy Film Archive in 2005 with funding from the Film Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mauna Kea: Temple Under Siege (2006)

Produced and directed by Puhipau and Joan Lander of Nā Maka o ka ʻĀina, this documentary about the dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawai’i examines the development vs. ecological preservation battle between scientists who use the mountain summit as an astronomical observatory and Hawaiians who want the mountain preserved as a cultural landscape sacred to the Hawaiian people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Outrage (1950)

For a few years beginning in the late 1940s, Ida Lupino, Hollywood’s only woman director of the period, made a series of distinctive films that spoke to the public’s desire, she stated, “to see something that fits in with their own concepts of the way people actually live in the world and the problems they must meet and overcome.” In “Outrage,” an unblinking examination of the traumatic effects of rape on a vulnerable young woman, Lupino, an actress of consummate grace and power, masterfully employed sound and silence, light and shadow, depth of field and cutting, camera movement and careful framing to cinematically capture the psychological impact of her character’s shattered world. Inspired by a question that Italian neo-realist director Roberto Rossellini posed to her at a party – “When are you going to make pictures about ordinary people, in ordinary situations” – Lupino, along with her husband Collier Young, associate producer Malvin Wald, and cinematographer Archie Stout created a series of low-budget impactful films with newfound talent, like Mala Powers, star of “Outrage.” Lupino’s films, Martin Scorsese has observed, “addressed the wounded soul and traced the slow, painful process of women trying to wrestle with despair and reclaim their lives.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

Shrek (2001)

Even by DreamWorks standards, the charm and magic of “Shrek” seemed extraordinary upon its initial release almost 20 years ago — and its power has yet to diminish in the intervening years. With this story of a green-skinned, solitude-loving ogre, Shrek, who embarks on a noble quest, alongside his new friend, a lovable donkey, the film manages to be both a send-up of fairy tale tropes and an affectionate tribute to them. Entertaining and emotionally impactful at levels to be appreciated by both children and their adults, “Shrek” was a mega-hit upon its release and has been followed by three equally enchanting sequels, a TV holiday special and a Broadway adaption. Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy and Cameron Diaz lead the strong voice cast.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Suspense (1913)

During the 1910s, women directors played a prominent role in the development of film as an art form. Chief among them was Lois Weber who was recognized alongside directors such as D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille. Weber’s films often touched on controversial social issues such as poverty and contraception.  In a 1913 Photoplay interview, Weber spoke of her desire to create films “that will have an influence for good on the public mind.” In this 1913 short, “A wife and her baby are alone in an isolated house when a tramp breaks in. As the wife tries to keep the invader at bay, her husband happens to telephone and learn what’s happening. He scrambles to return home. He steals an idle car, and its owner, accompanied by police, race after him. We cut rapidly between the besieged mother and the husband’s frantic drive, as he is in turn pursued. Just as the tramp is about to attack the wife, the husband bursts in, followed by the police. The family is saved. This is the plot of “Suspense,” co-directed by Lois Weber and Phillips Smalley. If the plot sounds familiar, it’s probably because you know that one of D.W. Griffith’s most famous films, “The Lonely Villa” (1909) tells the same basic tale. So Weber and Smalley are reviving an old idea. Their task is to make it fresh. How they do so has been studied in depth by Charlie Keil in his book “Early American Cinema in Transition: Story, Style, and Filmmaking, 1907-1913,” wrote film historian David Bordwell.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971)

With “Sweet Sweetback,” director Melvin Van Peebles touched off a wave of imitative Black features, few of which matched his startling originality and fierce attacks. The story of a male “performer” at a ghetto bordello and his run from the law, the film shrewdly mixes commercial ingredients and ideological intent. “It would be difficult to underestimate Melvin Van Peebles's achievement in producing, directing, writing, scoring and starring in this film, not to mention financing it with the salary he had earned while directing “Watermelon Man” (1970). Not since Oscar Micheaux had an African American filmmaker taken such complete control of the creative process, turning out a work so deeply connected to his own personal and cultural reality that he was not surprised when the white critical establishment professed bewilderment upon its release in 1971. Filled with enough sex, rage and violence to earn it an X rating, the success of “Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song” depends less on its story of a superstud running from the police than it does on its disinterest in referencing white culture and its radically new understanding of how style and substance inform each other,” wrote Steven Higgins in “Still Moving: The Film and Media Collections of the Museum of Modern Art.” MoMA has preserve the film from its original camera negative.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wattstax (1973)

Often called the “Black Woodstock,” this documentary from Memphis’ Stax Records stands as far more than simply a great concert film. “Wattstax” chronicles the renowned 1972 LA Memorial Coliseum concert and celebrates the Los Angeles’ black community’s rebirth after the tragedy of the Watts riots a few years earlier. Richard Pryor’s knowing monologues frame and serve as a Shakespearean musing on race relations and Black American life, alongside the incisive comments from people on the Watts streets. “Wattstax” also features dazzling music highlights  from artists such as Isaac Hayes and the Staple Singers, capped  by Rufus Thomas dancing the Funky Chicken in hot pants.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With Car and Camera Around the World (1929)

Filmed from 1922 to 1929, “With Car and Camera Around the World” (1929) documented the expeditions of Walter Wanderwell and Aloha Wanderwell Baker, the first woman to travel around the world by car. The couple, along with a crew of volunteers, crisscrossed dozens of countries in a caravan of Ford Model Ts, filming people, cultures and historical landmarks on 35mm film. Learning the filmmaking craft along the way, Aloha served as camera assistant, cinematographer, editor, actress, screenwriter, interpreter, driver, negotiator, and, at times, director. The Academy has preserved both edited and unedited shots from “With Car and Camera Around the World” in addition to a few sequences and outtakes from other films, including “The Last of the Bororos” (1931), “The River of Death” (1934) and “To See the World by Car” (1937). More information is available at: https://www.oscars.org/film-archive/collections/aloha-wanderwell-film-collection

Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel the same way about any lists:  who made the choices.

The list from the NY Times on the 25 best actors/actresses had some questionable choices, beginning with Denzel W.  Meryl Streep was left off the list.

I was happy to see Lilies of the Field and The Outrage included.  I feel in love (for a kid) with S. Potier after that and I'm a big fan of Ida Lupino.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BLACHEFAN said:

What do you guys think of the results from this year from yesterday?

 

Presumably "Shrek" was included because someone at Dreamworks had compromising photos of whoever runs the National Film Registry.  Or maybe the person making the choices was drunk.  Or maybe they cut-and-paste the wrong title, and didn't notice until it was too late.

 

The rest of the list is pretty solid, although calling "A Clockwork Orange" an American film strikes me as iffy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

You do know, BLACHEFAN,  that  you could have put all that info in ONE post?  ;) 

Sepiatone

Well, I choose to put the information in separate posts. I have a preferred system of how I post on the message boards.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Was thinking it would have taken a BIT lees space and less time.

But it's your time to waste however you prefer.  ;) 

Sepiatone

I was not overthinking it. I just do not want to use up the gigabytes on my laptop by putting in all the information in one post. I just like that because it is easier for me.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I HATE HATE HATE "Losing Ground". It is incomprehensible. The only positive I can think of is it is a chance to see Duane Jones in something that is not "Night of the Living Dead". 

Is it even possible to view "With Car and the Camera Around the World (1929)"? I don't see it available anywhere. 

Shrek  - Seriously? I enjoyed it the same way I enjoyed "Despicable Me", but I don't think it belongs in the registry either. It boils down to the same old "Beauty is on the inside not on the outside" trope which everybody preaches but nobody acts on. At least men don't think/act that way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was pleasantly surprised to see "The Battle Of The Century"  get chosen.   There are Laurel & Hardy films I would pick over this one, but can understand why this was chosen given how popular pie fights were in slapstick comedy and the one in this film is on an epic level (plus it's more clever than most).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...