Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

How Old Does It Need To Be A Classic?


JRMAX
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am curious --- How old does a movie need to be in order to be considered a clasic? I was surprisd to see that "Emma" (1996) on the schedule for today. That movie is only 11 years old. Also, would most people consider it to be "classic"? Just wondering how others feel about this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion, it's not a classic if it's made after 1979. So, yeah, I don't consider "Emma" to be a classic film. But people might tend to call it a classic because they think it's a really good movie. People tend to say about great movies, whether they're old or new, "that movie is such a classic!".

 

I, personally, don't like that fact that TCM has started adding such newer films to it's schedule such as "Emma." In fact, I absolutely hate it. We can watch the newer films, like "Emma" on any other channel, so I don't get why TCM has to play them. TCM should be a channel reserved for all the wonderful films from the golden era. From the earliest short films up until 1979.

 

Anyhow, that's just my humble opinion. Lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Topsey, I agree with you 100%. Yes, I love a certain automobile made in 1996 (it's elegant styling, manuevering, popularity, etc.) BUT, can it be called a classic car or classic auto when it is only 11 years old? No. In the world of furniture, you can only call something "antique" after 100 years of age. I remember when AMC (American Movie Classics) began doing this same thing - putting on "Caddyshack"and calling it a "classic." I actually wrote to AMC and complained when they began doing that crap. Of course, I never received a reply back. Sad. Unfortunately, I believe there is more of this nonsense in the future.

 

JRMAX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many an argument has been had on this board over this very thing. Indeed many people have different opinions. Some here think they shouldn't show anything after 1959. Others think maybe 1969.

 

That being said TCM has always, to some degree, shown newer movies. This is not a recent thing. My own opinion is that many of these newer films have a feel of a classic film. Costume dramas such as "Emma" have been made through the decades so, thematically, it would fit. Granted that is not the case of all newer movies.

 

One could make an argument that stars (and directors) that fit back in the classic era and lived long enough to make newer movies, if you set an arbitrary deadline, would be excluded.

 

It's not really about how good a film is. If that were the case you could throw out a lot of the films they show now. They are "programmers" or "B" films that were originally intended to fill out a bill. Then there are some new films that probably show up in a lease package and as long as they are handy they might as well show them as long as they are not too out of line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are different ways to define a classic

Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind, Superman 1978 , Jaws, ET, Indiana Jones, and Star Wars to me as well as other professional critics consider them classics but in a different way than before a certain time frame..

Depends on ones point of view..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kyle in Hollywood posted this statement from TCM in another thread.

 

 

 

Re: Why is TCM Showing Modern Movies???

Posted: Nov 14, 2007 10:08 PM in response to: Metropolisforever in response to: Metropolisforever

Click to reply to this thread Reply

From the Turner / TCM Corporate website -

 

About Turner Classic Movies

Turner Classic Movies, currently seen in more than 70 million homes, is a 24-hour cable network from Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., A Time Warner Company. TCM presents the greatest motion pictures of all time from the largest film library in the world, the combined Time Warner and Turner film libraries, from the ?20s through the ?90s, commercial-free and without interruption.

(emphisis added)

 

If you believe that TCM hasn't shown "contemporary" until recently, then you haven't been paying attention. Until three years ago, the phrase highlighted above read "from the '20s through the '80s". Shortly after TCM celebrated its 10 Year Anniversary, it was updated to read "through the '90s".

(end copy.)

 

Some of you are going to hate March.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is easily the hundreth thread about this exact same subject. Obviously, people have no idea what the definition of the word classic means, since they keep attributing age to it. Also, they keep thinking that the airing of films made within the past 20 years is some new development with TCM. They've been doing that she they station first came on the air.

 

To answer the question, a film can be 1 hour old and be a classic, if it is the among the finest examples of the genre it represents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I was surprisd to see that "Emma" (1996) on the schedule for today."

 

I was pleased to see Emma on the schedule for last night. I think it was a wonderful addition to an evening devoted to films about matchmaking. I am always impressed with choices made by TCM to theme out the evening hours every day.

 

I find it funny that some people will notice that the "contemporary" Emma premiered last night and ruminate about that but no one has mentioned the TCM premiere that preceeded it - The Matchmaker with the wonderful Shirley Booth and Paul Ford. THAT was the important scheduling event last night. And props to TCM for showing Hello Dolly! later on last night. Where else could one see the musical and its original source material in one evening than on TCM? No other channel immediately comes to my mind.

 

Add in last evening's lesser known and still entertaining Bachelor Bait later on and then finish up with Edgar G Ulmer's Yiddish film American Schadchen / American Matchmaker and it is a wonderfully full and interesting evening of television.

 

I didn't watch Emma last evening but I hope TCM schedules it again someday. I would like to see it - preferably paired with the film that used the Bronte source material as its inspiration - Clueless with Alicia Silverstone. Gasp! A pair of films from the '90's! Call me a heretic, I guess. But I was never good at being parochial about anything.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...